Latest & greatest articles for hepatitis

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Top results for hepatitis

41. Hepatitis A: How do I know my patient has it?

Hepatitis A: How do I know my patient has it? Diagnosis | Diagnosis | Hepatitis A | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Diagnosis Hepatitis A: How do I know my patient has it? Last revised in October 2019 How do I know my patient has it? Public Health England uses the following case definitions for hepatitis A: Clinical case (possible): A person with an acute illness, discrete onset of symptoms AND jaundice or elevated serum aminotransferase levels. For further information, see the sections (...) on and . Probable case : Meets the clinical case definition (above) and has an epidemiological link to a confirmed hepatitis A case, OR Meets the clinical case definition and has IgM antibody to the hepatitis A virus ( ). Confirmed case: Meets the clinical case definition and has IgM and IgG antibodies to hepatitis A, OR Has hepatitis A RNA (HAV RNA) detected regardless of clinical features, OR Is asymptomatic with no recent history of immunisation, but has anti HAV IgM in oral fluid or serum, and has

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

42. Hepatitis A: Scenario: Managing hepatitis A infection

Hepatitis A: Scenario: Managing hepatitis A infection Scenario: Managing hepatitis A infection | Management | Hepatitis A | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Scenario: Managing hepatitis A infection Hepatitis A: Scenario: Managing hepatitis A infection Last revised in October 2019 Scenario: Managing hepatitis A infection From birth onwards. How should I manage a person with confirmed or probable hepatitis A infection? Admit any person with hepatitis A infection to hospital if they are severely (...) tracing. If an outbreak is suspected, or the person is a food handler, notify the HPU immediately. Provide the person with information and advice about hepatitis A. In particular, advise them to: Avoid drinking alcohol during the acute illness, as this can increase the risk of liver damage. Avoid work, school, or nursery , until they are no longer infectious (typically 7 days after the onset of jaundice, or 7 days after the onset of symptoms if there is no history of jaundice). Take steps to minimize

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

43. Hepatitis A: Anti-pruritics

Hepatitis A: Anti-pruritics Anti-pruritics | Prescribing information | Hepatitis A | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Anti-pruritics Hepatitis A: Anti-pruritics Last revised in October 2019 Anti-pruritics Contraindications and cautions Chlorphenamine Sedating antihistamines should be used with caution in people with: Liver dysfunction — chlorphenamine can be used in people whose metabolic and synthetic function is unaffected (such as in mild hepatitis). However, seek specialist advice before using (...) chlorphenamine in people with moderate hepatic impairment. It must be avoided in people with severe hepatic impairment, such as those with cirrhosis or encephalopathy who may decompensate, because of its sedative effects. Urinary retention, prostatic hypertrophy, angle-closure glaucoma, or pyloroduodenal obstruction — if possible, avoid using sedating antihistamines because of their significant antimuscarinic activity (particularly in elderly people). Epilepsy — avoid chlorphenamine if possible, as it may

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

44. Hepatitis A: Anti-emetics

Hepatitis A: Anti-emetics Anti-emetics | Prescribing information | Hepatitis A | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Anti-emetics Hepatitis A: Anti-emetics Last revised in October 2019 Anti-emetics Contraindications and cautions Metoclopramide Metoclopramide should not be used in people with: Gastrointestinal obstruction, perforation or haemorrhage. Confirmed or suspected pheochromocytoma, due to the risk of severe hypertensive episodes. History of neuroleptic or metoclopramide-induced tardive (...) dyskinesia. Metoclopramide should be used with caution in people with: Liver dysfunction — metoclopramide can be used in people whose metabolic and synthetic function is unaffected (such as in mild hepatitis). However, seek specialist advice before using metoclopramide in people with more severe hepatic impairment, as reduced clearance may increase the risk of gynaecomastia and extrapyramidal adverse effects. The dose should be reduced by 50% in people with cirrhosis. Renal impairment — metoclopramide

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

45. Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A Hepatitis A | Topics A to Z | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Hepatitis A Hepatitis A Last revised in October 2019 Hepatitis A is inflammation of the liver caused by infection with the hepatitis A virus, and transmission is by the faecal-oral route. Diagnosis Management Prescribing information Background information Hepatitis A: Summary Hepatitis A is inflammation of the liver caused by infection with the hepatitis A virus; transmission is by the faecal-oral route. Hepatitis A infection (...) is usually self-limiting, causes an illness which usually lasts less than 2 months, has no long-term sequelae, has no chronic carrier state, and does not cause chronic liver disease. The clinical features of acute hepatitis A are common to all forms of viral hepatitis, and are characterized by different phases: Prodromal phase includes flu-like symptoms, gastrointestinal symptoms (such as anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal right upper quadrant discomfort), and occasionally headache, cough

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

46. Hepatitis A immunisation in persons not previously exposed to hepatitis A. (Abstract)

Hepatitis A immunisation in persons not previously exposed to hepatitis A. This review is withdrawn because it is outdated. A new review is to be published by the end of 2019.Copyright © 2019 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

2019 Cochrane

47. Hepatitis C Virus Screening and Care: Complexity of Implementation in Primary Care Practices Serving Disadvantaged Populations. (Abstract)

Hepatitis C Virus Screening and Care: Complexity of Implementation in Primary Care Practices Serving Disadvantaged Populations. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) disproportionately affects disadvantaged communities.To examine processes and outcomes of Screen, Treat, Or Prevent Hepatocellular Carcinoma (STOP HCC), a multicomponent intervention for HCV screening and care in safety-net primary care practices.Mixed-methods retrospective analysis.5 federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) and 1 family

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

48. Carfilzomib (Kyprolis): risk of reactivation of hepatitis B virus

Carfilzomib (Kyprolis): risk of reactivation of hepatitis B virus Carfilzomib (Kyprolis▼): risk of reactivation of hepatitis B virus - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies which are essential for the site to work. We also use non-essential cookies to help us improve government digital services. Any data collected is anonymised. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Accept cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Carfilzomib (Kyprolis▼): risk (...) of reactivation of hepatitis B virus Establish hepatitis B status before initiating carfilzomib and in patients with unknown hepatitis B virus serology who are already being treated with carfilzomib. Published 21 November 2019 From: Therapeutic area: , , , Contents Advice for healthcare professionals: hepatitis B virus reactivation has been reported in patients treated with carfilzomib screen all patients for hepatitis B virus before initiation of carfilzomib; patients with unknown serology who are already

2019 MHRA Drug Safety Update

49. Glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (chronic hepatitis C in adolescents) - Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book V

Glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (chronic hepatitis C in adolescents) - Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book V Extract 1 Translation of Sections 2.1 to 2.6 of the dossier assessment Glecaprevir/Pibrentasvir (chronische Hepatitis C bei Jugendlichen) – Nutzenbewertung gemäß § 35a SGB V (Version 1.0; Status: 11 July 2019). Please note: This translation is provided as a service by IQWiG to English-language readers. However, solely the German original text is absolutely authoritative (...) and legally binding. IQWiG Reports – Commission No. A19-33 Glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (chronic hepatitis C in adolescents) – Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book V 1 Extract of dossier assessment A19-33 Version 1.0 Glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (chronic hepatitis C in adolescents) 11 July 2019 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) - i - Publishing details Publisher: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care Topic: Glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (chronic hepatitis C

2019 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare (IQWiG)

50. Hepatitis B: the green book, chapter 18

Hepatitis B: the green book, chapter 18 Hepatitis B: the green book, chapter 18 - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies which are essential for the site to work. We also use non-essential cookies to help us improve government digital services. Any data collected is anonymised. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Accept cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Guidance Hepatitis B: the green book, chapter 18 Hepatitis B immunisation information (...) for public health professionals. Published 20 March 2013 Last updated 18 November 2019 — From: Documents If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email . Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. Details is an infection of the liver caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Published 20 March 2013 Last updated 18 November 2019 18 November 2019 Removed previous

2019 Public Health England

51. Practice Advisory: Hepatitis B Prevention

Practice Advisory: Hepatitis B Prevention Practice Advisory: Hepatitis B Prevention - ACOG Menu ▼ Practice Advisory: Hepatitis B Prevention Page Navigation ▼ Share: Practice Advisory: Hepatitis B Prevention The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) have released updated guidance on preventing the transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (1). A critical element of the strategy to eliminate HBV in the United States (...) is the prevention of perinatal transmission. The CDC and ACIP’s updated guidance reflects the best currently available evidence and select new or updated recommendations include the following: Pregnant women positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) should be tested for hepatitis B virus deoxyribonucleic acid (HBV DNA) to guide the use of antiviral medication to prevent perinatal transmission Persons with chronic liver disease* should be vaccinated against HBV The American Association for the Study

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

52. Hepatitis E: health protection response to reports of infection

Hepatitis E: health protection response to reports of infection Hepatitis E: health protection response to reports of infection - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies which are essential for the site to work. We also use non-essential cookies to help us improve government digital services. Any data collected is anonymised. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Accept cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Register by 26 November to vote (...) in the General Election on 12 December. Guidance Hepatitis E: health protection response to reports of infection Guidance on low public health risk, surveillance process and follow up with contacts. Published 14 June 2012 Last updated 8 November 2019 — From: Documents Ref: PHE publications gateway number: GW-698 If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email . Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you

2019 Public Health England

53. Norovirus and hepatitis A virus scheme: recent intended results

Norovirus and hepatitis A virus scheme: recent intended results Norovirus and hepatitis A virus scheme: recent intended results - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies which are essential for the site to work. We also use non-essential cookies to help us improve government digital services. Any data collected is anonymised. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Accept cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Register by 26 November to vote (...) in the General Election on 12 December. Guidance Norovirus and hepatitis A virus scheme: recent intended results This proficiency testing (PT) scheme is suitable for laboratories that examine viruses in food products or waters using molecular methods. Published 31 July 2017 Last updated 5 November 2019 — From: Documents If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email . Please tell us what format you need. It will help us

2019 Public Health England

54. Hepatitis B: clinical and public health management

Hepatitis B: clinical and public health management Hepatitis B: clinical and public health management - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies which are essential for the site to work. We also use non-essential cookies to help us improve government digital services. Any data collected is anonymised. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Accept cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Register by 26 November to vote in the General Election on 12 (...) December. Guidance Hepatitis B: clinical and public health management Information for healthcare professionals on the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of hepatitis B. Published 31 July 2014 Last updated 5 November 2019 — From: Contents Diagnosis Hepatitis B is a virus that replicates in the liver but is also present at very high levels in the blood of people who are infected. The hepatitis B virus ( ( . When an individual (recipient) is thought to have been exposed to blood from another individual

2019 Public Health England

55. Divergent Hypoglycemic Effects of Hepatic-Directed Prandial Insulin: A Six-Month Phase 2b Study in Type 1 Diabetes (Abstract)

Divergent Hypoglycemic Effects of Hepatic-Directed Prandial Insulin: A Six-Month Phase 2b Study in Type 1 Diabetes Hepatic-directed vesicle insulin (HDV) uses a hepatocyte-targeting moiety passively attaching free insulin, improving subcutaneous insulin's hepatic biodistribution. We assessed HDV-insulin lispro (HDV-L) versus insulin lispro (LIS) in type 1 diabetes (T1D).Insulin Liver Effect (ISLE-1) was a 26-week, phase 2b, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, noninferiority trial.Among 176

2019 EvidenceUpdates

56. Rifaximin for reducing recurrent episodes of overt hepatic encephalopathy

Rifaximin for reducing recurrent episodes of overt hepatic encephalopathy '); } else { document.write(' '); } ACE | Rifaximin for reducing recurrent episodes of overt hepatic encephalopathy Search > > Rifaximin for reducing recurrent episodes of overt hepatic encephalopathy - Rifaximin for reducing recurrent episodes of overt hepatic encephalopathy Published on 2 May 2019 Guidance Recommendations The Ministry of Health's Drug Advisory Committee has recommended: Rifaximin 550 mg tablet as add (...) -on therapy to lactulose for reducing recurrent episodes of overt hepatic encephalopathy. Subsidy status Rifaximin 550 mg tablet is recommended for inclusion on the MOH Standard Drug List (SDL) for the abovementioned indication. Quicklinks | | | | | Copyrights © 2019 Ministry of Health, Singapore. Last Updated on 2 May 2019

2019 Appropriate Care Guides, Agency for Care Effectiveness (Singapore)

57. Direct-acting antiviral agents for genotype 2 to 6 chronic hepatitis C

Direct-acting antiviral agents for genotype 2 to 6 chronic hepatitis C '); } else { document.write(' '); } ACE | Direct-acting antiviral agents for genotype 2 to 6 chronic hepatitis C Search > > Direct-acting antiviral agent for treating genotype 2 to 6 chronic hepatitis C - Direct-acting antiviral agents for treating genotype 2 to 6 chronic hepatitis C First published on 2 January 2019 Guidance Recommendations The Ministry of Health's Drug Advisory Committee has recommended: Sofosbuvir 400 mg (...) /velpatasvir 100 mg tablet for treating genotype 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 chronic hepatitis C infection in treatment-naïve, or pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (PR)-experienced or NS3/4A protease inhibitor (boceprevir, simeprevir, telaprevir)-experienced adults. Sofosbuvir/velpatasvir should be used in line with the recommended treatment regimen and duration: 12 weeks' treatment of sofosbuvir/velpatasvir for patients with genotype 2 to 6 hepatitis C virus without cirrhosis or with compensated cirrhosis (Child

2019 Appropriate Care Guides, Agency for Care Effectiveness (Singapore)

58. Glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (Maviret) - chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in adolescents

Glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (Maviret) - chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in adolescents Published 11 November 2019 1 Product update SMC2214 glecaprevir/pibrentasvir 100mg/40mg film-coated tablets (Maviret®) AbbVie Ltd 04 October 2019 The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) has completed its assessment of the above product and advises NHS Boards and Area Drug and Therapeutic Committees (ADTCs) on its use in NHSScotland. The advice is summarised as follows: ADVICE: following an abbreviated (...) submission glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (Maviret®) is accepted for use within NHSScotland. Indication under review: treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in adolescents aged 12 to <18 years. SMC has previously accepted glecaprevir/pibrentasvir for the treatment of chronic HCV infection in adults. This SMC advice takes account of the benefits of a Patient Access Scheme (PAS) that improves the cost-effectiveness of glecaprevir/pibrentasvir. This advice is contingent upon the continuing

2019 Scottish Medicines Consortium

59. Antivirals for adults with recent onset (acute) hepatitis C

Antivirals for adults with recent onset (acute) hepatitis C NHS England » Antivirals for adults with recent onset (acute) hepatitis C Search Search Menu Antivirals for adults with recent onset (acute) hepatitis C Document first published: 26 September 2019 Page updated: 26 September 2019 Topic: Publication type: NHS England will routinely commission antivirals for adults with acute hepatitis C (HCV), including the treatment of acute HCV infection in immunosuppressed adults (e.g. post

2019 NHS England

60. Hepatitis C. (Abstract)

Hepatitis C. Hepatitis C is a global health problem, and an estimated 71·1 million individuals are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The global incidence of HCV was 23·7 cases per 100 000 population (95% uncertainty interval 21·3-28·7) in 2015, with an estimated 1·75 million new HCV infections diagnosed in 2015. Globally, the most common infections are with HCV genotypes 1 (44% of cases), 3 (25% of cases), and 4 (15% of cases). HCV transmission is most commonly associated (...) % of individuals with hepatitis C know their diagnosis, and only 15% of those with known hepatitis C have been treated. Increased diagnosis and linkage to care through universal access to affordable point-of-care diagnostics and pangenotypic direct-acting antiviral therapy is essential to achieve the WHO 2030 elimination targets.Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

2019 Lancet