Latest & greatest articles for headache

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Top results for headache

161. Acupuncture for the management of chronic headache: a systematic review

Acupuncture for the management of chronic headache: a systematic review Acupuncture for the management of chronic headache: a systematic review Acupuncture for the management of chronic headache: a systematic review Sun Y, Gan TJ CRD summary This well-conducted review concluded that needling acupuncture was superior to sham acupuncture and medication therapy for reducing chronic headache intensity, frequency and improving response rate. The authors' conclusion is an accurate reflection (...) of the results but, given differences between trials and small sample sizes, the reliability is uncertain. Authors' objectives To evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for the treatment of chronic headache. Searching MEDLINE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2006) and Scopus were searched without language restriction for relevant articles to November 2007. Search terms were reported. A Chinese medical journal and the bibliographies of retrieved articles and reviews were

DARE.2008

162. Does the addition of dexamethasone to standard therapy for acute migraine headache decrease the incidence of recurrent headache for patients treated in the emergency department: a meta-analysis and systematic review of the literature

Does the addition of dexamethasone to standard therapy for acute migraine headache decrease the incidence of recurrent headache for patients treated in the emergency department: a meta-analysis and systematic review of the literature Does the addition of dexamethasone to standard therapy for acute migraine headache decrease the incidence of recurrent headache for patients treated in the emergency department: a meta-analysis and systematic review of the literature Does the addition (...) of dexamethasone to standard therapy for acute migraine headache decrease the incidence of recurrent headache for patients treated in the emergency department: a meta-analysis and systematic review of the literature Singh A, Alter H J, Zaia B CRD summary The authors concluded that dexamethasone was moderately effective at preventing headache recurrence when used in the emergency department as an addition to standard treatment of acute migraine headache. Side effects were mild and transient. The conclusions

DARE.2008

163. Biofeedback treatment for headache disorders: a comprehensive efficacy review

Biofeedback treatment for headache disorders: a comprehensive efficacy review Biofeedback treatment for headache disorders: a comprehensive efficacy review Biofeedback treatment for headache disorders: a comprehensive efficacy review Nestoriuc Y, Martin A, Rief W, Andrasik F CRD summary Biofeedback for migraine was supported as an effective treatment and biofeedback for tension-type headache was effective and specific. The strong conclusions of this review should be treated with caution due (...) to the poor reporting of the analyses. Authors' objectives To systematically review the efficacy of biofeedback for headache disorders: migraine and tension-type headaches (an update). Searching The following databases were searched for articles from inception to March 2008: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and PSYNDEX. Search terms were reported and two previous reviews (Nestoriuc, et al. 2007 and 2008, see Other Publications of Related Interest) were checked

DARE.2008

164. Acupuncture for tension-type headache: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Acupuncture for tension-type headache: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Acupuncture for tension-type headache: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Acupuncture for tension-type headache: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Davis M A, Kononowech R W, Rolin S A, Spierings E L CRD summary This well-conducted review suggested that acupuncture had limited efficacy (visible only at longer term follow-up) for reducing headache frequency in tension-type headache (...) compared with sham acupuncture. The results were likely to be reliable, but further research was needed to assess other variations of needle-based acupuncture and subtypes of tension-type headache. Authors' objectives To evaluate the safety and efficacy of acupuncture for tension-type headaches. Searching The following databases were searched without language restriction from inception to August 2007: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Search terms

DARE.2008

165. Meta-analysis of biofeedback for tension-type headache: efficacy, specificity, and treatment moderators

Meta-analysis of biofeedback for tension-type headache: efficacy, specificity, and treatment moderators Meta-analysis of biofeedback for tension-type headache: efficacy, specificity, and treatment moderators Meta-analysis of biofeedback for tension-type headache: efficacy, specificity, and treatment moderators Nestoriuc Y, Rief W, Martin A CRD summary This review found that biofeedback provided significant relief of headache symptoms compared with the pre-treatment state (...) , but was not significantly more effective than drug therapy, physical therapy or cognitive therapy. The lack of evidence for superior efficacy over other treatments limits the reliability of the authors’ conclusion that biofeedback constituted an evidence-based treatment for tension-type headache. Authors' objectives To investigate the efficacy of biofeedback as a treatment for tension-type headache (TTH), its effects on various specific outcomes and to investigate potentially moderating effects of treatment and patient

DARE.2008

166. Epidural blood patch in post dural puncture headache: a randomised, observer-blind, controlled clinical trial

Epidural blood patch in post dural puncture headache: a randomised, observer-blind, controlled clinical trial 17635971 2008 04 14 2008 04 29 2008 04 14 1468-330X 79 5 2008 May Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr. Epidural blood patch in post dural puncture headache: a randomised, observer-blind, controlled clinical trial. 553-8 To determine the efficacy of epidural blood patch (EDBP) for the treatment of post dural puncture headache (PDPH). We (...) randomised 42 patients who presented with PDPH, lasting 24 h to 1 week, to receive EDBP (n = 19) or conservative treatment (n = 23). The primary end point was any headache at 24 h after the start of treatment. Secondary end points were presence and severity of headache after 1 week. Stratified Mantel-Haenzel analysis was used to adjust for confounders. Two patients refused to participate directly after randomisation and allocation to conservative treatment. They were excluded from the study. At 24 h

EvidenceUpdates2008

167. Cost-effectiveness of acupuncture treatment in patients with headache

Cost-effectiveness of acupuncture treatment in patients with headache 18315686 2008 03 04 2008 04 07 2008 03 04 1468-2982 28 4 2008 Apr Cephalalgia : an international journal of headache Cephalalgia Cost-effectiveness of acupuncture treatment in patients with headache. 334-45 10.1111/j.1468-2982.2007.01504.x The aim was to assess costs and cost-effectiveness of additional acupuncture treatment in patients with headache compared with patients receiving routine care alone. A randomized (...) , controlled trial was conducted, including patients (> or =18 years old) with primary headache (more than 12 months, at least two headaches/month). Outcome parameters were quality of life (Short Form 36), direct and indirect costs differences during the 3-month study period and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of acupuncture treatment. A total of 3182 patients (1613 acupuncture; 1569 controls) with headache were included (77.4% women, mean age and standard deviation 42.6 +/- 12.3; 22.6% men

EvidenceUpdates2008

168. Evaluation and Management of Adult Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Acute Headache

Evaluation and Management of Adult Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Acute Headache ACEP Clinical Policies // ACEP Welcome Guest, » Clinical Policies ACEP Clinical Policies Review & Download our Clinical policies ACEP’s Clinical Policies are developed by the Clinical Policies Committee guided by processes in accord with national guideline-development standards. The policies are approved by the ACEP Board of Directors to provide guidance on the clinical management of emergency

Congress of Neurological Surgeons2008

169. Dipyrone for acute primary headaches.

Dipyrone for acute primary headaches. BACKGROUND: Dipyrone is used to treat headaches in many countries, but is not available in others (particularly the USA and UK) because of its association with potentially life-threatening blood dyscrasias such as agranulocytosis. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and safety of dipyrone for acute primary headaches in adults and children. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Pain, Palliative & Supportive Care Group's Trials Register (...) ; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS, and the reference lists of included studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Double-blind randomised controlled trials of dipyrone for the symptomatic relief of acute primary headaches in adults and children. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three authors independently screened articles, extracted data, assessed trial quality and analysed results. Relative risks (RRs), risk differences (RDs), weighted mean differences (WMDs

Cochrane2007

170. Treatment of medically intractable cluster headache by occipital nerve stimulation: long-term follow-up of eight patients.

Treatment of medically intractable cluster headache by occipital nerve stimulation: long-term follow-up of eight patients. BACKGROUND: Cluster headache is a form of primary headache that features repeated attacks of excruciatingly severe headache usually occurring several times a day. Patients with chronic cluster headache have unremitting illness that necessitates daily preventive medical treatment for years. When medically intractable, the condition has previously been treatable only (...) with cranially invasive or neurally destructive methods. METHODS: Eight patients with medically intractable chronic cluster headache were implanted in the suboccipital region with electrodes for occipital nerve stimulation. Other than the first patient, who was initially stimulated unilaterally before being stimulated bilaterally, all patients were stimulated bilaterally during treatment. FINDINGS: At a median follow-up of 20 months (range 6-27 months for bilateral stimulation), six of eight patients

Lancet2007

171. Is any one analgesic superior for episodic tension-type headache?

Is any one analgesic superior for episodic tension-type headache? Though all non-narcotic analgesics have equivalent efficacy against tension-type headache, ibuprofen's generally favorable side-effect profile makes it a reasonable first choice.

EvidenceUpdates2007

172. Dexamethasone in Benign Headaches

Dexamethasone in Benign Headaches Dexamethasone in Benign Headaches « Sinai EM Journal Club Emergency Medicine Discussion Forum Dexamethasone in Benign Headaches This week in journal club, Matt reviewed a nice little trial submitted by a group of Texans to the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine. They studied IV dexamethasone in preventing benign headache recurrence ( , ) – something I had never tried, but apparently has been bouncing around the neurology and EM literature for . It turns out (...) that migraines may not be simply a vascular disorder, but rather an inflammatory disease. And, as Matt pointed out, it’s very difficult to diagnose migraines; it might be simpler for us ED folk to say headaches exist on a continuum between , and maybe ED patients with primary headache would benefit from a steroid. The authors had two aims: to see if patients discharged from the ED with benign headache had less recurrence if they received dex, and to see if dexamethasone could reduce the need for future

Sinai EM Journal Club2007

174. EFNS guidelines on the treatment of cluster headache and other trigeminal-autonomic cephalalgias.

EFNS guidelines on the treatment of cluster headache and other trigeminal-autonomic cephalalgias. EFNS guidelines on the treatment of cluster headache and other trigeminal-autonomic cephalalgias. | National Guideline Clearinghouse Search Sign In Username or Email * Password * Remember Me Don't have an account? Guideline Summary NGC:005494 This guideline summary has been replaced by an updated version. Please update your bookmarks. View the updated summary: NGC:008771 View all updated summaries

European Federation of Neurological Societies2006

175. Aspirin, 1000 mg, reduced moderate to severe pain in acute migraine headache

Aspirin, 1000 mg, reduced moderate to severe pain in acute migraine headache Aspirin, 1000 mg, reduced moderate to severe pain in acute migraine headache | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword (...) Main menu Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Aspirin, 1000 mg, reduced moderate to severe pain in acute migraine headache Article Text Treatment Aspirin, 1000 mg, reduced moderate to severe pain in acute migraine headache Free Diana E McMillan , RN, PhD Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available for this article. Lipton RB, Goldstein

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2006

176. Does this patient with headache have a migraine or need neuroimaging?

Does this patient with headache have a migraine or need neuroimaging? CONTEXT: In assessing the patient with headache, clinicians are often faced with 2 important questions: Is this headache a migraine? Does this patient require neuroimaging? The diagnosis of migraine can direct therapy, and information obtained from the history and physical examination is used by physicians to determine which patients require neuroimaging. OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of the history and physical (...) examination that distinguish patients with migraine from those with other headache types and that identify those patients who should undergo neuroimaging. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: A systematic review was performed using articles from MEDLINE (1966-November 2005) that assessed the performance characteristics of screening questions in diagnosing migraine (with the International Headache Society diagnostic criteria as a gold standard) and addressed the accuracy of the clinical examination

JAMA2006

177. Does this patient with headache have a migraine or need neuroimaging?

Does this patient with headache have a migraine or need neuroimaging? Does this patient with headache have a migraine or need neuroimaging? Does this patient with headache have a migraine or need neuroimaging? Detsky M E, McDonald D R, Baerlocher M O, Tomlinson G A, McCrory D C, Booth C M CRD summary This review evaluated the usefulness of history and physical examination in identifying patients with headache who should undergo neuroimaging. The authors concluded that patients (...) with the identified clinical features associated with significant intracranial abnormality should undergo neuroimaging. Given the limitations of the evidence presented, and the possibility that studies might have been missed, the results should be interpreted with caution. Authors' objectives To evaluate the usefulness of the history and physical examination in identifying patients who should undergo neuroimaging and distinguishing patients with migraine from those with other headache types. The latter question

DARE.2006

178. Psychological treatment of recurrent headache in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis

Psychological treatment of recurrent headache in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis Psychological treatment of recurrent headache in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis Psychological treatment of recurrent headache in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis Trautmann E, Lackschewitz H, Kroner-Herwig B CRD summary The authors concluded that efficacy of psychological treatments in paediatric headache patients is supported at evidence level 1a (several consistent RCTs support (...) efficacy). Treatment efficacy is demonstrated for up to 1 year and shows a trend for further improvement beyond this point. Given the unclear quality of included studies and the potential for reviewer error and bias, the authors' conclusions should be treated with caution. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of psychological treatments for headaches in children and adolescents. Searching MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PSYNDEX and the Cochrane Library were searched from inception to July 2004

DARE.2006

179. Autogenic training for tension type headaches: a systematic review of controlled trials

Autogenic training for tension type headaches: a systematic review of controlled trials Autogenic training for tension type headaches: a systematic review of controlled trials Autogenic training for tension type headaches: a systematic review of controlled trials Kanji N, White A R, Ernst E CRD summary This well-conducted review compared autogenic training (AT) with cognitive coping, biofeedback or hypnosis for tension-type headaches in adults. Given the paucity of good-quality studies included (...) in their review, the authors concluded that there was insufficient evidence to reach conclusions on the effectiveness of AT. These conclusions are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To determine the effectiveness of autogenic training (AT) (a self-help relaxation technique) in the prevention of tension-type headaches in adults. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, the Cochrane CENTRAL Register, PsycINFO and CINAHL were searched. The search dates covered 1969 to January 2005 and keywords were reported

DARE.2006