Latest & greatest articles for headache

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on headache and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for headache

3. Addition of Neostigmine and Atropine to Conventional Management of Postdural Puncture Headache: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Addition of Neostigmine and Atropine to Conventional Management of Postdural Puncture Headache: A Randomized Controlled Trial 30169405 2018 11 15 1526-7598 127 6 2018 Dec Anesthesia and analgesia Anesth. Analg. Addition of Neostigmine and Atropine to Conventional Management of Postdural Puncture Headache: A Randomized Controlled Trial. 1434-1439 10.1213/ANE.0000000000003734 Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) lacks a standard evidence-based treatment. A patient treated with neostigmine

EvidenceUpdates2018

4. Paracetamol is a weak painkiller for regular tension headaches

Paracetamol is a weak painkiller for regular tension headaches Signal - Paracetamol is a weak painkiller for regular tension headaches Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Paracetamol is a weak painkiller for regular tension headaches Published on 13 September 2016 Paracetamol is only slightly more effective than dummy tablets (placebo) at relieving pain in people who experience regular tension-type headaches. A Cochrane review found that 24 out of 100 people who took (...) paracetamol for regular tension-type headaches were pain free at two hours, compared with 19 out of 100 who took an inactive placebo. There was no difference in risk of side effects between paracetamol and placebo. Paracetamol is a cheap drug that is readily available over-the-counter. Because serious side effects are so uncommon and the “placebo effect” is so strong, this drug could be considered as an option for treating regular tension-type headache for people who find that it helps them. However

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

5. Acupuncture for migraine headaches

Acupuncture for migraine headaches Acupuncture for migraine headaches Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Acupuncture for migraine headaches View/ Open Date 2010-04 Format Metadata Abstract Acupuncture reduces the frequency of migraine headaches when used as an adjunct to, or in place of, medical management

Clinical Inquiries2018

6. Atraumatic needles reduce headaches following lumbar puncture

Atraumatic needles reduce headaches following lumbar puncture Atraumatic needles reduce headaches following lumbar puncture Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Atraumatic needles reduce headaches following lumbar puncture Published on 17 April 2018 Use of atraumatic needles rather than conventional needles for lumbar puncture more than halves the rate of post-procedure headache. Moreover, this improvement does not come at the expense of procedure success rates. Lumbar puncture (...) involves inserting a needle in the lower back into the spinal canal to collect cerebrospinal fluid for diagnosis, or to inject a treatment or anaesthetic into it. A common side effect is a headache, often from leakage of fluid from the puncture. Atraumatic needles leave a smaller puncture. After piercing the skin with an introducer needle, the atraumatic needle is inserted through the introducer. This spreads apart the fibres of the canal lining rather than cutting through it with a conventional needle

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

7. Migraine headache in adults

Migraine headache in adults Migraine headache in adults - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Migraine headache in adults Last reviewed: September 2018 Last updated: August 2018 Important updates Erenumab approved in the EU for the prevention of migraine Erenumab, a novel treatment for migraine prevention, has been approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the prophylaxis of migraine in adults who (...) to confirm that appropriate advice has been given and understood. The EMA said the new measures were put in place because of evidence suggesting that information on the risks of valproate use in pregnancy was still not getting through to women, despite earlier steps aimed at ensuring this. Summary Migraine is a chronic, genetically determined, episodic, neurological disorder that usually presents in early-to-mid life. Patients complain of intermittent headache and associated symptoms, such as visual

BMJ Best Practice2018

8. Fremanezumab for preventive treatment of migraine: Functional status on headache-free days

Fremanezumab for preventive treatment of migraine: Functional status on headache-free days 30120138 2018 08 18 1526-632X 2018 Aug 17 Neurology Neurology Fremanezumab for preventive treatment of migraine: Functional status on headache-free days. 10.1212/01.wnl.0000544321.19316.40 10.1212/01.wnl.0000544321.19316.40 To evaluate the effect of fremanezumab on the functional status on headache-free days in phase 2 episodic migraine (EM) and chronic migraine (CM) studies. Functional status data were (...) collected prospectively via the electronic headache diary on all headache-free days by patients answering questions regarding work/school/household chore performance, speed of work completion, concentration, and feeling of fatigue. Individuals with EM receiving monthly doses of fremanezumab 225 mg (n = 96) or 675 mg (n = 97) or placebo (n = 104) were compared. Individuals with CM receiving fremanezumab 675 mg followed by monthly 225 mg (n = 88) and 900 mg (n = 86) were also independently compared

EvidenceUpdates2018

10. Headache

Headache Top results for headache - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature My query is: English Français Deutsch Čeština Español Magyar Svenska ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing (...) the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for headache The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines

Trip Latest and Greatest2018

11. Headache

Headache Autosynthesis - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice My query is: English Français Deutsch Čeština Español Magyar Svenska ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search

Trip Evidence Maps2018

12. Melatonin for preventing primary headache: A systematic review

Melatonin for preventing primary headache: A systematic review 29799148 2018 05 25 1742-1241 2018 May 24 International journal of clinical practice Int. J. Clin. Pract. Melatonin for preventing primary headache: A systematic review. e13203 10.1111/ijcp.13203 The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of melatonin for primary headache. This systematic review following the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions recommendations and PRISMA Statement. Four (...) randomized controlled trials were included (351 participants). According to the GRADE approach the quality of evidence was very low. The use of melatonin for migraine showed that (i) reduced the number of days with pain and the analgesic consumption when compared with placebo, (ii) no benefits on headache intensity, number of headache days and analgesics consumption when compared with amitriptyline, (iii) reduced the number of analgesic consumption, the attack frequency and the headache intensity when

EvidenceUpdates2018

13. The Impact of Spinal Needle Selection on Postdural Puncture Headache: A Meta-Analysis and Metaregression of Randomized Studies

The Impact of Spinal Needle Selection on Postdural Puncture Headache: A Meta-Analysis and Metaregression of Randomized Studies 29659437 2018 04 16 1532-8651 2018 Apr 14 Regional anesthesia and pain medicine Reg Anesth Pain Med The Impact of Spinal Needle Selection on Postdural Puncture Headache: A Meta-Analysis and Metaregression of Randomized Studies. 10.1097/AAP.0000000000000775 Potentially broadened indications for spinal anesthesia require increased understanding of the risk factors (...) and prevention measures associated with postdural puncture headache (PDPH). This review is designed to examine the association between spinal needle characteristics and incidence of PDPH. Meta-analysis and metaregression was performed on randomized controlled trials to determine the effect of needle design and gauge on the incidence of PDPH after controlling for patient confounders such as age, sex, and year of publication. Fifty-seven randomized controlled trials (n = 16416) were included in our analysis

EvidenceUpdates2018

14. Paracetamol is a weak painkiller for regular tension headaches

Paracetamol is a weak painkiller for regular tension headaches NIHR DC | Signal - Paracetamol is a weak painkiller for regular tension headaches Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Paracetamol is a weak painkiller for regular tension headaches Published on 13 September 2016 Paracetamol is only slightly more effective than dummy tablets (placebo) at relieving pain in people who experience regular tension-type headaches. A Cochrane review found that 24 out of 100 (...) people who took paracetamol for regular tension-type headaches were pain free at two hours, compared with 19 out of 100 who took an inactive placebo. There was no difference in risk of side effects between paracetamol and placebo. Paracetamol is a cheap drug that is readily available over-the-counter. Because serious side effects are so uncommon and the “placebo effect” is so strong, this drug could be considered as an option for treating regular tension-type headache for people who find

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

15. Aminophylline for treatment of postdural puncture headache: A randomized clinical trial

Aminophylline for treatment of postdural puncture headache: A randomized clinical trial 29572284 2018 03 24 1526-632X 2018 Mar 23 Neurology Neurology Aminophylline for treatment of postdural puncture headache: A randomized clinical trial. 10.1212/WNL.0000000000005351 10.1212/WNL.0000000000005351 To investigate the efficacy and safety of IV aminophylline for patients with postdural puncture headache (PDPH). We randomly assigned patients to groups receiving either 250 mg IV aminophylline (...) or a placebo within 3 hours of symptom onset once daily for 2 consecutive days. The primary endpoint was headache severity 8 hours after treatment. We assessed this using visual analog scale (VAS) scores taken from patients in a standing position. We also recorded posttreatment VAS score changes, Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) scores, and adverse events. We performed an intention-to-treat analysis. We enrolled 126 patients with PDPH at 5 centers in China (62 assigned to the aminophylline group

EvidenceUpdates2018

16. Dose-response and efficacy of spinal manipulation for care of cervicogenic headache: a dual-center randomized controlled trial

Dose-response and efficacy of spinal manipulation for care of cervicogenic headache: a dual-center randomized controlled trial 29481979 2018 03 20 1878-1632 2018 Feb 23 The spine journal : official journal of the North American Spine Society Spine J Dose-response and efficacy of spinal manipulation for care of cervicogenic headache: a dual-center randomized controlled trial. S1529-9430(18)30077-9 10.1016/j.spinee.2018.02.019 The optimal number of visits for the care of cervicogenic headache (...) was funded by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (R01AT006330) and is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01530321). The authors declare no conflicts of interest. A linear dose-response was observed for all follow-ups, a reduction of approximately 1 CGH day/4 weeks per additional 6 SMT visits (p<.05); a maximal effective dose could not be determined. Cervicogenic headache days/4 weeks were reduced from about 16 to 8 for the highest and most effective dose of 18 SMT visits. Mean

EvidenceUpdates2018

17. Local injection therapy for cervicogenic headache and occipital neuralgia

Local injection therapy for cervicogenic headache and occipital neuralgia Local injection therapy for cervicogenic headache and occipital neuralgia Local injection therapy for cervicogenic headache and occipital neuralgia HAYES, Inc Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation HAYES, Inc. Local injection therapy for cervicogenic (...) headache and occipital neuralgia. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc. Directory Publication. 2017 Authors' conclusions Rationale: For some patients with cervicogenic headache or occipital neuralgia, conservative medical treatments, including oral analgesics and physical therapy, may be sufficient to relieve pain. However, a population of patients with refractory pain may require more invasive treatments, including injection therapy or surgical interventions. Technology Description: Local injection with analgesic

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2018

18. Tension-type headache

Tension-type headache Tension-type headache - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Tension-type headache Last reviewed: August 2018 Last updated: July 2018 Summary Tension-type headaches can be either episodic or chronic. Stress and mental tension are common triggers. Symptoms include dull, non-pulsatile, bilateral, constricting pain (not severe); pericranial tenderness is common. Unlike migraine (...) , there is no significant nausea, no vomiting, and a lack of aggravation by routine physical activity. Usually responds to simple analgesics; preventative treatments have less evidence for their effectiveness. Non-drug therapies include relaxation, electromyographic biofeedback, cognitive behavioural therapy, and physiotherapy. Definition Tension-type headaches can be either episodic or chronic. They are rarely disabling or associated with any significant autonomic phenomena, thus patients do not usually seek medical

BMJ Best Practice2018

19. Cluster headache

Cluster headache Cluster headache - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Cluster headache Last reviewed: August 2018 Last updated: July 2018 Summary Attack of severe pain localised to the unilateral orbital, supra-orbital, and/or temporal areas; lasts from 15 minutes to 3 hours. Occurs from once every other day to 8 times per day. Attacks occur at the same time period for several weeks (the cluster period (...) ); accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs. Most patients are restless or agitated during attacks compared to people with migraine who often report motion sensitivity during attacks. Pathophysiology is thought to result from hypothalamic activation with secondary trigeminal and autonomic activation. Cluster period attacks can be precipitated by alcohol, volatile smells, warm temperatures, and sleep. Diagnosis is based on International Headache Society 3-beta (IHS-3b) criteria. Medications for acute

BMJ Best Practice2018

20. Migraine headache in adults

Migraine headache in adults Migraine headache in adults - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Migraine headache in adults Last reviewed: August 2018 Last updated: August 2018 Important updates European Medicines Agency (EMA) strengthens measures to avoid use of valproate medicines in pregnancy In March 2018, the EMA announced stronger measures aimed at avoiding the exposure of babies to valproate medicines (...) migraine the reduction was either 1.3 or 1.8 days, depending on the dose taken. The most common side effects were injection site reactions, constipation, muscle spasms and pruritus. The Food and Drug Administration in the US approved erenumab in May 2018 for the preventive treatment of migraine in adults. Summary Migraine is a chronic, genetically determined, episodic, neurological disorder that usually presents in early-to-mid life. Patients complain of intermittent headache and associated symptoms

BMJ Best Practice2018