Latest & greatest articles for folic acid

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Top results for folic acid

121. Lowering blood homocysteine with folic acid-based supplements: meta-analysis of randomised trials

Lowering blood homocysteine with folic acid-based supplements: meta-analysis of randomised trials Lowering blood homocysteine with folic acid-based supplements: meta-analysis of randomised trials Lowering blood homocysteine with folic acid-based supplements: meta-analysis of randomised trials Homocysteine Lowering Trialists' Collaboration Authors' objectives To determine the size of reduction in homocysteine concentrations produced by dietary supplementation with folic acid and with vitamins (...) B12 or B6. Searching English and non-English language studies were sought in MEDLINE. The reference lists were scanned and personal contact was made with relevant investigators. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review Published and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included if they had assessed the effects on blood homocysteine concentrations of folic acid supplements with or without the addition of vitamins B6 or B12. Excluded were studies which did

1998 DARE.

122. Reduction of plasma homocyst(e)ine levels by breakfast cereal fortified with folic acid in patients with coronary heart disease. (Abstract)

Reduction of plasma homocyst(e)ine levels by breakfast cereal fortified with folic acid in patients with coronary heart disease. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recommended that cereal-grain products be fortified with folic acid to prevent congenital neural-tube defects. Since folic acid supplementation reduces levels of plasma homocyst(e)ine, or plasma total homocysteine, which are frequently elevated in arterial occlusive disease, we hypothesized that folic acid fortification might (...) reduce plasma homocyst(e)ine levels.To test this hypothesis, we assessed the effects of breakfast cereals fortified with three levels of folic acid, and also containing the recommended dietary allowances of vitamins B6 and B12, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial in 75 men and women with coronary artery disease.Plasma folic acid increased and plasma homocyst(e)ine decreased proportionately with the folic acid content of the breakfast cereal. Cereal providing 127 microg

1998 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

123. Lowering blood homocysteine with folic acid based supplements: meta-analysis of randomised trials. Homocysteine Lowering Trialists' Collaboration. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Lowering blood homocysteine with folic acid based supplements: meta-analysis of randomised trials. Homocysteine Lowering Trialists' Collaboration. To determine the size of reduction in homocysteine concentrations produced by dietary supplementation with folic acid and with vitamins B-12 or B-6.Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials that assessed the effects of folic acid based supplements on blood homocysteine concentrations. Multivariate regression analysis was used to determine (...) the effects on homocysteine concentrations of different doses of folic acid and of the addition of vitamin B-12 or B-6.Individual data on 1114 people included in 12 trials.The proportional and absolute reductions in blood homocysteine produced by folic acid supplements were greater at higher pretreatment blood homocysteine concentrations (P < 0.001) and at lower pretreatment blood folate concentrations (P < 0.001). After standardisation to pretreatment blood concentrations of homocysteine of 12 mumol/l

1998 BMJ

124. Minimum effective dose of folic acid for food fortification to prevent neural-tube defects. (Abstract)

Minimum effective dose of folic acid for food fortification to prevent neural-tube defects. Although a daily supplement of 400 micrograms folic acid has been shown to prevent neural-tube defects (NTD), most women do not take the recommended supplement. Thus, food fortification is to be introduced in the USA and is being considered in the UK. Because of safety concerns, the USA has chosen a level of fortification that will increase the average woman's intake by only 100 micrograms (...) . Such an increase, although safe, may be ineffective; but a trial to assess its efficacy would be unethical. Because women with red-cell folate concentrations above 400 micrograms/L have a very low risk of NTD, we undertook a randomised trial of several folic acid doses to find out how much is needed to reach this protective concentration.We screened 323 women. 172 with red-cell folate between 150 micrograms/L and 400 micrograms/L were invited to take part in the trial. 121 women were randomly assigned placebo

1997 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

125. A quantitative assessment of plasma homocysteine as a risk factor for vascular disease. Probable benefits of increasing folic acid intakes. (Abstract)

A quantitative assessment of plasma homocysteine as a risk factor for vascular disease. Probable benefits of increasing folic acid intakes. To determine the risk of elevated total homocysteine (tHcy) levels for arteriosclerotic vascular disease, estimate the reduction of tHcy by folic acid, and calculate the potential reduction of coronary artery disease (CAD) mortality by increasing folic acid intake.MEDLINE search for meta-analysis of 27 studies relating homocysteine to arteriosclerotic (...) vascular disease and 11 studies of folic acid effects on tHcy levels.Studies dealing with CAD, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial vascular disease were selected. Three prospective and six population-based case-control studies were considered of high quality. Five cross-sectional and 13 other case-control studies were also included. Causality of tHcy's role in the pathogenesis of vascular disease was inferred because of consistency across studies by different investigators using different

1995 JAMA

126. Folic acid fortification of grain: an economic analysis

Folic acid fortification of grain: an economic analysis Folic acid fortification of grain: an economic analysis Folic acid fortification of grain: an economic analysis Romano P S, Waitzman N J, Scheffler R M, Pi R D Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study (...) and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Fortification of grain with folic acid to prevent neural tube defects (spina bifida and anencephaly). Type of intervention Primary prevention. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Women of child-bearing age (11 to 50 years). Setting Community. The economic study was carried out in California, USA. Dates to which data relate Data on the effectiveness of folic acid fortification was taken from two studies published in 1989 and 1991. The data

1995 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.