Latest & greatest articles for fluconazole

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Top results for fluconazole

1. Fluconazole

Fluconazole Top results for fluconazole - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2 (...) ) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for fluconazole The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

2. Yeast infection in pregnancy? Think twice about fluconazole

Yeast infection in pregnancy? Think twice about fluconazole Yeast infection in pregnancy? Think twice about fluconazole Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Yeast infection in pregnancy? Think twice about fluconazole View/ Open Date 2016-09 Format Metadata Abstract Yeast infection in pregnancy? Think twice (...) about fluconazole. This study's findings regarding the risk of miscarriage may mean it's time to forego fluconazole in favor of topical azoles as first-line treatment. Practice changer: Avoid prescribing oral fluconazole in early pregnancy because it is associated with a higher rate of spontaneous abortion than is topical azole therapy. Stength of recommendation: B: Based on a large cohort study performed in Denmark. URI Part of Citation Journal of Family Practice, 65(9) 2016: 624-626 Rights

2017 PURLS

3. Clinical effects of topical antifungal therapy in chronic rhinosinusitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of intranasal fluconazole. (PubMed)

Clinical effects of topical antifungal therapy in chronic rhinosinusitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of intranasal fluconazole. Several studies have been in favor of fungi as a possible pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS); however, to date, there is no scientific consensus about the use of antifungal agents in disease management. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of intranasal fluconazole in improving disease symptoms and objective (...) outcomes of patients with CRS. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 54 patients who were diagnosed with CRS and had not been responsive to routine medical treatments. They were randomly assigned to receive either fluconazole nasal drop 0.2 % or placebo in addition to the standard regimen for a duration of 8 weeks. Patients' outcomes were evaluated according to Sino-Nasal Outcome Test 20 (SNOT-20), endoscopic scores, and Computed Tomography (CT) scores. No statistically

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2016 EXCLI journal

4. Cohort study: Oral fluconazole is often used during pregnancy in the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis despite safety concerns to the fetus

Cohort study: Oral fluconazole is often used during pregnancy in the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis despite safety concerns to the fetus Oral fluconazole is often used during pregnancy in the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis despite safety concerns to the fetus | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please (...) see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Oral fluconazole is often used during pregnancy in the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis despite safety concerns

2016 Evidence-Based Nursing

5. Fluconazole

Fluconazole USE OF FLUCONAZOLE IN PREGNANCY 0344 892 0909 USE OF FLUCONAZOLE IN PREGNANCY (Date of issue: May 2016 , Version: 2.2 ) This is a UKTIS monograph for use by health care professionals. For case-specific advice please contact UKTIS on 0344 892 0909. To report an exposure please download and complete a . Please encourage all women to complete an . A corresponding patient information leaflet on is available at . Summary Fluconazole is a triazole antifungal commonly used in the treatment (...) of candidiasis. Standard fluconazole therapy generally comprises a single 150mg oral dose. Fluconazole is not recommended for use during pregnancy. However, vaginal candidiasis is common in pregnancy, and as fluconazole is sometimes prescribed to treat candidiasis that has not responded to topical clotrimazole treatment, exposure during pregnancy is not uncommon. Where fluconazole use is considered necessary in pregnancy, the risks and benefits of treatment should be discussed with the patient to support

2014 UK Teratology Information Service

6. Effect of fluconazole prophylaxis on candidiasis and mortality in premature infants: a randomized clinical trial. (PubMed)

Effect of fluconazole prophylaxis on candidiasis and mortality in premature infants: a randomized clinical trial. Invasive candidiasis in premature infants causes death and neurodevelopmental impairment. Fluconazole prophylaxis reduces candidiasis, but its effect on mortality and the safety of fluconazole are unknown.To evaluate the efficacy and safety of fluconazole in preventing death or invasive candidiasis in extremely low-birth-weight infants.This study was a randomized, blinded, placebo (...) -controlled trial of fluconazole in premature infants. Infants weighing less than 750 g at birth (N = 361) from 32 neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the United States were randomly assigned to receive either fluconazole or placebo twice weekly for 42 days. Surviving infants were evaluated at 18 to 22 months corrected age for neurodevelopmental outcomes. The study was conducted between November 2008 and February 2013.Fluconazole (6 mg/kg of body weight) or placebo.The primary end point

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2014 JAMA

7. Use of oral fluconazole during pregnancy and the risk of birth defects. (PubMed)

Use of oral fluconazole during pregnancy and the risk of birth defects. Case reports suggest that long-term, high-dose fluconazole treatment for severe fungal infections during pregnancy causes a pattern of birth defects. It is unclear whether commonly used lower doses increase the risk of specific birth defects.In a registry-based cohort of liveborn infants in Denmark, we evaluated first-trimester oral fluconazole exposure and the risk of birth defects overall and of birth defects previously (...) linked to azole antifungal agents.The majority of fluconazole-exposed pregnancies were in women who received common therapeutic doses of 150 mg (56% of pregnancies) or 300 mg (31%). Oral fluconazole exposure was not associated with an increased risk of birth defects overall (210 birth defects among 7352 fluconazole-exposed pregnancies [prevalence, 2.86%] and 25,159 birth defects among 968,236 unexposed pregnancies [prevalence, 2.60%]; adjusted prevalence odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI

2013 NEJM

8. Fluconazole administration for the treatment of ductal yeast enfections: clinical effectiveness and safety

Fluconazole administration for the treatment of ductal yeast enfections: clinical effectiveness and safety Fluconazole administration for the treatment of ductal yeast enfections: clinical effectiveness and safety Fluconazole administration for the treatment of ductal yeast enfections: clinical effectiveness and safety CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been (...) made for the HTA database. Citation CADTH. Fluconazole administration for the treatment of ductal yeast enfections: clinical effectiveness and safety. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response - Summary of Abstracts. 2013 Authors' conclusions No health technology assessments, systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, or non-randomized studies were identified regarding the clinical effectiveness or safety of fluconazole for the treatment of ductal

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of anidulafungin versus fluconazole for the treatment of invasive candidiasis

Cost-effectiveness analysis of anidulafungin versus fluconazole for the treatment of invasive candidiasis Cost-effectiveness analysis of anidulafungin versus fluconazole for the treatment of invasive candidiasis Cost-effectiveness analysis of anidulafungin versus fluconazole for the treatment of invasive candidiasis Neoh CF, Liew D, Slavin M, Marriott D, Chen SC, Morrissey O, Stewart K, Kong DC Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria (...) for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary The objective was to determine the cost-effectiveness of anidulafungin versus fluconazole in the treatment of invasive candidiasis. The authors concluded that anidulafungin was cost-effective. The methods were adequate, and they and the results were sufficiently reported. Given the scope

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2011 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

10. Randomised controlled trial of prophylactic fluconazole versus nystatin for the prevention of fungal colonisation and invasive fungal infection in very low birth weight infants (PubMed)

Randomised controlled trial of prophylactic fluconazole versus nystatin for the prevention of fungal colonisation and invasive fungal infection in very low birth weight infants Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. The authors conducted the first prospective, randomised controlled trial of nystatin compared with fluconazole for the prevention of fungal colonisation and invasive fungal infection in very low birth weight (VLBW) neonates.During (...) a 12-month period, all VLBW neonates were assigned randomly to receive nystatin (1 ml suspension, 100 000 U/ml, every 8 h), fluconazole (3 mg/kg body weight, every third day) or placebo from birth until day 30 of life (day 45 for neonates weighing <1000 g at birth). The authors performed weekly surveillance cultures and systemic fungal susceptibility testing.During the study period, 278 infants (fluconazole group, n=93; nystatin group, n=94; control group, n=91) weighing <1500 g at birth were

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2011 EvidenceUpdates

11. Fluconazole and pharmaceuticals without inactive ingredients for autism: a review of the clinical effectiveness

Fluconazole and pharmaceuticals without inactive ingredients for autism: a review of the clinical effectiveness Fluconazole and pharmaceuticals without inactive ingredients for autism: a review of the clinical effectiveness Fluconazole and pharmaceuticals without inactive ingredients for autism: a review of the clinical effectiveness Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member (...) of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health. Fluconazole and pharmaceuticals without inactive ingredients for autism: a review of the clinical effectiveness. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). 2010 Authors' conclusions The efficacy of antifungal agents for the treatment of autism has not been demonstrated in published clinical trials or observational studies

2010 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

12. Cost-effectiveness of posaconazole versus fluconazole or itraconazole in the prevention of invasive fungal infections among neutropenic patients in the United States

Cost-effectiveness of posaconazole versus fluconazole or itraconazole in the prevention of invasive fungal infections among neutropenic patients in the United States Cost-effectiveness of posaconazole versus fluconazole or itraconazole in the prevention of invasive fungal infections among neutropenic patients in the United States Cost-effectiveness of posaconazole versus fluconazole or itraconazole in the prevention of invasive fungal infections among neutropenic patients in the United States (...) O'Sullivan AK, Pandya A, Papadopoulos G, Thompson D, Langston A, Perfect J, Weinstein MC Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary This study examined the cost-effectiveness of posaconazole compared with fluconazole or itraconazole

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2009 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

13. Itraconazole vs fluconazole for the treatment of uncomplicated acute vaginal and vulvovaginal candidiasis in nonpregnant women: a metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials (PubMed)

Itraconazole vs fluconazole for the treatment of uncomplicated acute vaginal and vulvovaginal candidiasis in nonpregnant women: a metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials In this metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) we aimed to compare the in vivo and in vitro activity and the safety of per os itraconazole and fluconazole treatment of uncomplicated acute vaginal/vulvovaginal candidiasis in nonpregnant women. We used PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library (...) to identify the studies that were relevant to our metaanalysis RCTs. Six RCTs were included in this study that comprised 1092 enrolled patients with signs and symptoms of vaginal/vulvovaginal candidiasis that was confirmed by microscopy and/or microbiologic cultures that were obtained from the ectocervix and/or vaginal fundus. Overall, there was no difference between itraconazole and fluconazole regarding clinical cure and improvement at the first and second scheduled visit assessments (pooled odds ratio

2008 EvidenceUpdates

14. Itraconazole vs fluconazole for the treatment of uncomplicated acute vaginal and vulvovaginal candidiasis in nonpregnant women: a metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials

Itraconazole vs fluconazole for the treatment of uncomplicated acute vaginal and vulvovaginal candidiasis in nonpregnant women: a metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials Itraconazole vs fluconazole for the treatment of uncomplicated acute vaginal and vulvovaginal candidiasis in nonpregnant women: a metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials Itraconazole vs fluconazole for the treatment of uncomplicated acute vaginal and vulvovaginal candidiasis in nonpregnant women: a metaanalysis (...) of randomized controlled trials Pitsouni E, Iavazzo C, Falagas M E CRD summary This review assessed the effectiveness and safety of oral itraconazole and fluconazole for uncomplicated acute vaginal and vulvovaginal candidiasis in non pregnant women, concluding that both regimens had similar effectiveness and safety. The reliability of the conclusion was uncertain given the poor quality of the included studies. Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness and safety of oral itraconazole and fluconazole

2008 DARE.

15. Comparative cost-effectiveness of posaconazole versus fluconazole or itraconazole prophylaxis in patients with prolonged neutropenia

Comparative cost-effectiveness of posaconazole versus fluconazole or itraconazole prophylaxis in patients with prolonged neutropenia Comparative cost-effectiveness of posaconazole versus fluconazole or itraconazole prophylaxis in patients with prolonged neutropenia Comparative cost-effectiveness of posaconazole versus fluconazole or itraconazole prophylaxis in patients with prolonged neutropenia Collins CD, Ellis JJ, Kaul DR Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation (...) that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary The objective was to examine the cost-effectiveness of posaconazole in comparison with fluconazole or itraconazole for the treatment of patients with prolonged neutropenia. The authors concluded that posaconazole was the most cost-effective strategy over either

2008 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

16. Recurrent tinea versicolor: treatment with itraconazole or fluconazole?

Recurrent tinea versicolor: treatment with itraconazole or fluconazole? BestBets: Recurrent tinea versicolor: treatment with itraconazole or fluconazole? Recurrent tinea versicolor: treatment with itraconazole or fluconazole? Report By: Anastasia Pantazidou, Marc Tebruegge - Senior House Officer, Department of Paediatrics, Specialist Registrar, Department of Paediatric Infectious Diseases respectively Search checked by Bob Phillips - Section Editor, Archimedes, Archives of Disease in Childhood (...) Institution: North Middlesex Hospital, London and St Mary's Hospital, London, UK Date Submitted: 26th October 2007 Date Completed: 26th October 2007 Last Modified: 26th October 2007 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [a child/adolescent with tinea versicolor] is [oral itraconazole more effective than oral fluconazole] as [regards cure]? Clinical Scenario A 14-year-old girl is seen in the paediatric outpatient department. She was referred by her general practitioner (GP) with persistent tinea

2007 BestBETS

17. Posaconazole or fluconazole for prophylaxis in severe graft-versus-host disease. (PubMed)

Posaconazole or fluconazole for prophylaxis in severe graft-versus-host disease. Invasive fungal infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.In an international, randomized, double-blind trial, we compared oral posaconazole with oral fluconazole for prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in patients with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) who were receiving immunosuppressive therapy. The primary end point (...) was the incidence of proven or probable invasive fungal infections from randomization to day 112 of the fixed treatment period of the study.Of a total of 600 patients, 301 were assigned to posaconazole and 299 to fluconazole. At the end of the fixed 112-day treatment period, posaconazole was found to be as effective as fluconazole in preventing all invasive fungal infections (incidence, 5.3% and 9.0%, respectively; odds ratio, 0.56; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.30 to 1.07; P=0.07) and was superior

2007 NEJM

18. Posaconazole vs. fluconazole or itraconazole prophylaxis in patients with neutropenia. (PubMed)

Posaconazole vs. fluconazole or itraconazole prophylaxis in patients with neutropenia. Patients with neutropenia resulting from chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia or the myelodysplastic syndrome are at high risk for difficult-to-treat and often fatal invasive fungal infections.In this randomized, multicenter study involving evaluators who were unaware of treatment assignments, we compared the efficacy and safety of posaconazole with those of fluconazole or itraconazole as prophylaxis (...) for patients with prolonged neutropenia. Patients received prophylaxis with each cycle of chemotherapy until recovery from neutropenia and complete remission, until occurrence of an invasive fungal infection, or for up to 12 weeks, whichever came first. We compared the incidence of proven or probable invasive fungal infections during treatment (the primary end point) between the posaconazole and fluconazole or itraconazole groups; death from any cause and time to death were secondary end points.A total

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2007 NEJM

19. Anidulafungin versus fluconazole for invasive candidiasis. (PubMed)

Anidulafungin versus fluconazole for invasive candidiasis. Anidulafungin, a new echinocandin, has potent activity against candida species. We compared anidulafungin with fluconazole in a randomized, double-blind, noninferiority trial of treatment for invasive candidiasis.Adults with invasive candidiasis were randomly assigned to receive either intravenous anidulafungin or intravenous fluconazole. All patients could receive oral fluconazole after 10 days of intravenous therapy. The primary (...) efficacy analysis assessed the global response (clinical and microbiologic) at the end of intravenous therapy in patients who had a positive baseline culture. Efficacy was also assessed at other time points.Eighty-nine percent of the 245 patients in the primary analysis had candidemia only. Candida albicans was isolated in 62% of the 245 patients. In vitro fluconazole resistance was infrequent. Most of the patients (97%) did not have neutropenia. At the end of intravenous therapy, treatment

2007 NEJM

20. A multicenter, randomized trial of prophylactic fluconazole in preterm neonates. (PubMed)

A multicenter, randomized trial of prophylactic fluconazole in preterm neonates. Invasive candida infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of fluconazole for the prevention of fungal colonization and infection in very-low-birth-weight neonates.During a 15-month period, all neonates weighing less than 1500 g at birth from eight tertiary Italian neonatal intensive care units (322 (...) infants) were randomly assigned to receive either fluconazole (at a dose of either 6 mg or 3 mg per kilogram of body weight) or placebo from birth until day 30 of life (day 45 for neonates weighing <1000 g at birth). We performed weekly surveillance cultures and systematic fungal susceptibility testing.Among infants receiving fluconazole, fungal colonization occurred in 9.8% in the 6-mg group and 7.7% in the 3-mg group, as compared with 29.2% in the placebo group (P<0.001 for both fluconazole groups

2007 NEJM