Latest & greatest articles for ferrous sulfate

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Top results for ferrous sulfate

1. Comparison of Ferrous Sulfate, Polymaltose Complex and Iron-zinc in Iron Deficiency Anemia

Comparison of Ferrous Sulfate, Polymaltose Complex and Iron-zinc in Iron Deficiency Anemia Comparison of Ferrous Sulfate, Polymaltose Complex and Iron-zinc in Iron Deficiency Anemia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more (...) studies before adding more. Comparison of Ferrous Sulfate, Polymaltose Complex and Iron-zinc in Iron Deficiency Anemia The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02076828 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : March 4, 2014 Last Update Posted : March 4, 2014 Sponsor: Hacettepe University

2014 Clinical Trials

2. Ferrous Sulfate (Fe2+) Had a Faster Effect Than Did Ferric Polymaltose (Fe3+) on Increased Oxidant Status in Children With Iron-deficiency Anemia. (PubMed)

Ferrous Sulfate (Fe2+) Had a Faster Effect Than Did Ferric Polymaltose (Fe3+) on Increased Oxidant Status in Children With Iron-deficiency Anemia. The purpose of this study was to compare the total oxidant and antioxidant effect of different oral iron preparations in children with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA).A total of 65 children with IDA were randomized to receive 5 mg Fe/kg/d iron (II) sulfate (Fe(2+) group, n=33) or iron (III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex (Fe(3+) group, n=32); healthy

2014 Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology

3. Effect of Low-Dose Ferrous Sulfate vs Iron Polysaccharide Complex on Hemoglobin Concentration in Young Children With Nutritional Iron-Deficiency Anemia: A Randomized Clinical Trial. (PubMed)

Effect of Low-Dose Ferrous Sulfate vs Iron Polysaccharide Complex on Hemoglobin Concentration in Young Children With Nutritional Iron-Deficiency Anemia: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) affects millions of persons worldwide, and is associated with impaired neurodevelopment in infants and children. Ferrous sulfate is the most commonly prescribed oral iron despite iron polysaccharide complex possibly being better tolerated.To compare the effect of ferrous sulfate (...) with iron polysaccharide complex on hemoglobin concentration in infants and children with nutritional IDA.Double-blind, superiority randomized clinical trial of infants and children aged 9 to 48 months with nutritional IDA (assessed by history and laboratory criteria) that was conducted in an outpatient hematology clinic at a US tertiary care hospital from September 2013 through November 2015; 12-week follow-up ended in January 2016.Three mg/kg of elemental iron once daily as either ferrous sulfate

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2017 JAMA

4. Efficacy, Tolerability, and Acceptability of Iron Hydroxide Polymaltose Complex versus Ferrous Sulfate: A Randomized Trial in Pediatric Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia. (PubMed)

Efficacy, Tolerability, and Acceptability of Iron Hydroxide Polymaltose Complex versus Ferrous Sulfate: A Randomized Trial in Pediatric Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia. Iron polymaltose complex (IPC) offers similar efficacy with superior tolerability to ferrous sulfate in adults, but randomized trials in children are rare. In a prospective, open-label, 4-month study, 103 children aged >6 months with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) were randomized to IPC once daily or ferrous sulfate twice (...) daily, (both 5 mg iron/kg/day). Mean increases in Hb to months 1 and 4 with IPC were 1.2 ± 0.9 g/dL and 2.3 ± 1.3 g/dL, respectively, (both P = 0.001 versus baseline) and 1.8 ± 1.7 g/dL and 3.0 ± 2.3 g/dL with ferrous sulfate (both P = 0.001 versus baseline) (n.s. between groups). Gastrointestinal adverse events occurred in 26.9% and 50.9% of IPC and ferrous sulfate patients, respectively (P = 0.012). Mean acceptability score at month 4 was superior with IPC versus ferrous sulfate (1.63 ± 0.56

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2011 International journal of pediatrics

5. Ferrous bisglycinate 25 mg iron is as effective as ferrous sulfate 50 mg iron in the prophylaxis of iron deficiency and anemia during pregnancy in a randomized trial. (PubMed)

Ferrous bisglycinate 25 mg iron is as effective as ferrous sulfate 50 mg iron in the prophylaxis of iron deficiency and anemia during pregnancy in a randomized trial. To compare the effects of oral ferrous bisglycinate 25 mg iron/day vs. ferrous sulfate 50 mg iron/day in the prevention of iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in pregnant women.Randomized, double-blind, intention-to-treat study.Antenatal care clinic.80 healthy ethnic Danish pregnant women.Women were allocated (...) to ferrous bisglycinate 25 mg elemental iron (Aminojern®) (n=40) or ferrous sulfate 50 mg elemental iron (n=40) from 15 to 19 weeks of gestation to delivery. Hematological status (hemoglobin, red blood cell indices) and iron status (plasma iron, plasma transferrin, plasma transferrin saturation, plasma ferritin) were measured at 15-19 weeks (baseline), 27-28 weeks and 36-37 weeks of gestation.Occurrence of ID (ferritin <15 μg/L) and IDA (ferritin <12 μg/L and hemoglobin <110 g/L).At inclusion, there were

2014 Journal of perinatal medicine

6. Ferrous sulfate versus iron polymaltose complex for treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children. (PubMed)

Ferrous sulfate versus iron polymaltose complex for treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children. We assessed the clinical response and side effects of Ferrous sulfate (FS) and Iron polymaltose complex (IPC) in 118 children with Iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Subjects were randomized to receive therapy with either oral IPC (Group A, n=59) or oral FS (Group B, n=59); all were given elemental iron in three divided doses of 6 mg/kg/day. One hundred and six children could be followed up; 53 (...) in each group. Children who received ferrous sulfate were having higher hemoglobin level, and less residual complaints as compared to those who had received iron polymaltose complex. Our study suggests ferrous sulfate has a better clinical response and less significant adverse effects during treatment of IDA in children.

2009 Indian pediatrics

7. A Study to Compare the Gastrointestinal Tolerability of Ferrochel®, Sumalate®,Ferrous Fumarate, Ferrous Sulfate, Ferric Glycinate, and Placebo

A Study to Compare the Gastrointestinal Tolerability of Ferrochel®, Sumalate®,Ferrous Fumarate, Ferrous Sulfate, Ferric Glycinate, and Placebo A Study to Compare the Gastrointestinal Tolerability of Ferrochel®, Sumalate®,Ferrous Fumarate, Ferrous Sulfate, Ferric Glycinate, and Placebo - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save (...) this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. A Study to Compare the Gastrointestinal Tolerability of Ferrochel®, Sumalate®,Ferrous Fumarate, Ferrous Sulfate, Ferric Glycinate, and Placebo The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details

2014 Clinical Trials

8. Intravenous iron sucrose versus oral iron ferrous sulfate for antenatal and postpartum iron deficiency anemia: a randomized trial. (PubMed)

Intravenous iron sucrose versus oral iron ferrous sulfate for antenatal and postpartum iron deficiency anemia: a randomized trial. To compare oral iron to intravenous iron administration to women in late pregnancy and/or after labor to correct iron deficiency.271 anemic women (148 pregnant women and 123 women post lower segment caesarean section) with hemoglobin (Hb) levels below 110 g/L were enrolled over a two-year period and randomized to receive either two tablets FGF (ferrous sulfate

2013 The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians

9. Efficacy and safety of oral iron(III) polymaltose complex versus ferrous sulfate in pregnant women with iron-deficiency anemia: a multicenter, randomized, controlled study. (PubMed)

Efficacy and safety of oral iron(III) polymaltose complex versus ferrous sulfate in pregnant women with iron-deficiency anemia: a multicenter, randomized, controlled study. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of iron(III) polymaltose complex (Maltofer(®)) versus ferrous sulfate in iron-deficient pregnant women using recommended doses.An exploratory, open-label, randomized, controlled, multicenter study was undertaken in 80 pregnant women with iron-deficiency anemia (hemoglobin ≤ 10.5 g/dL (...) , serum ferritin ≤ 15 ng/mL and mean corpuscular volume < 80 fL). Patients were randomized 1:1 to oral iron(III) polymaltose complex or ferrous sulfate (each 100 mg iron twice daily) for 90 days.The primary endpoint, change in hemoglobin from baseline to days 60 and 90, did not differ significantly between treatment groups. The mean (SD) change to day 90 was 2.16 (0.67) g/dL in the iron(III) polymaltose complex group and 1.93 (0.97) g/dL in the ferrous sulfate group (n.s). Mean serum ferritin at day

2011 The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians

10. Liquid or Water Soluble Polysaccharide-Iron Complex versus Ferrous Sulfate for Pediatric Populations: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness

Liquid or Water Soluble Polysaccharide-Iron Complex versus Ferrous Sulfate for Pediatric Populations: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Liquid or Water Soluble Polysaccharide-Iron Complex versus Ferrous Sulfate for Pediatric Populations: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Liquid or Water Soluble Polysaccharide-Iron Complex versus Ferrous Sulfate for Pediatric Populations: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Liquid or Water Soluble Polysaccharide-Iron Complex (...) versus Ferrous Sulfate for Pediatric Populations: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Published on: May 26, 2016 Project Number: RB0988-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of liquid or water soluble polysaccharide-iron complex versus ferrous sulfate in pediatric populations? What is the cost-effectiveness of liquid or water soluble polysaccharide-iron-complex versus ferrous sulfate in pediatric populations

2016 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

11. Ferrous Acetyl-Aspartate Casein Formulation Evaluation Over Ferrous Sulfate in Iron Deficiency Anemia

Ferrous Acetyl-Aspartate Casein Formulation Evaluation Over Ferrous Sulfate in Iron Deficiency Anemia Ferrous Acetyl-Aspartate Casein Formulation Evaluation Over Ferrous Sulfate in Iron Deficiency Anemia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please (...) remove one or more studies before adding more. Ferrous Acetyl-Aspartate Casein Formulation Evaluation Over Ferrous Sulfate in Iron Deficiency Anemia (ACCESS) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03524651

2018 Clinical Trials

12. Ferrous sulfate

Ferrous sulfate Top results for ferrous sulfate - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2 (...) ) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for ferrous sulfate The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

13. Iron absorption following a single oral dose of ferrous sulfate or ferric gluconate in patients with gastrectomy. (PubMed)

Iron absorption following a single oral dose of ferrous sulfate or ferric gluconate in patients with gastrectomy. Iron deficiency anemia frequently occurs in gastrectomized patients.Serum iron levels following the ingestion of a single oral dose of 105 mg elemental iron, taken as ferrous sulfate (FeS) or ferric gluconate (FeG), have been evaluated in 20 gastrectomized patients (and 20 controls). All subjects participated on 2 different test days, 1 month apart: they took a single dose of 105 mg

2013 Annals of nutrition & metabolism

14. Effect of supplementation with ferrous sulfate or iron bis-glycinate chelate on ferritin concentration in Mexican schoolchildren: A randomized controlled trial. (PubMed)

Effect of supplementation with ferrous sulfate or iron bis-glycinate chelate on ferritin concentration in Mexican schoolchildren: A randomized controlled trial. Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional deficiencies worldwide. It is more prevalent when iron requirements are increased during pregnancy and during growth spurts of infancy and adolescence. The last stage in the process of iron depletion is characterized by a decrease in hemoglobin concentration, resulting in iron (...) deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency, even before it is clinically identified as anemia, compromises the immune response, physical capacity for work, and intellectual functions such as attention level. Therefore, interventions addressing iron deficiency should be based on prevention rather than on treatment of anemia. The aim of this study was to compare short- and medium-term effects on ferritin concentration of daily supplementation with ferrous sulfate or iron bis-glycinate chelate in schoolchildren

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2014 Nutrition journal

15. Oral administration of ferrous sulfate, but not of iron polymaltose or sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (NaFeEDTA), results in a substantial increase of non-transferrin-bound iron in healthy iron-adequate men. (PubMed)

Oral administration of ferrous sulfate, but not of iron polymaltose or sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (NaFeEDTA), results in a substantial increase of non-transferrin-bound iron in healthy iron-adequate men. Oral iron supplementation with ferrous sulfate (FeSO₄) at dosage levels suggested by the international guidelines poses a safety hazard to young children with malaria. Exposure to loosely bound iron in the circulation has been advanced as a potential factor.To evaluate

2012 Food and nutrition bulletin

16. Ferrous Sulfate Versus Iron Amino Acid Chelate

Ferrous Sulfate Versus Iron Amino Acid Chelate Ferrous Sulfate Versus Iron Amino Acid Chelate - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Ferrous Sulfate Versus Iron Amino Acid Chelate The safety (...) it can help more people than other solutions. It is going to carry out a community trial to compare the efficacy of ferrous sulfate with respect to iron amino acid chelate as a dietary supplement in preschool children of Medellin with depleted levels of iron; in terms of increasing ferritin levels in blood and maintain hemoglobin levels. It is hypothesized that at the end of the study the effect of milk fortified with iron amino acid chelate won't be less than the effect of fortified with ferrous

2011 Clinical Trials

17. Efficacy and safety of ferric carboxymaltose versus ferrous sulfate for iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy: subgroup analysis of Korean women. (PubMed)

Efficacy and safety of ferric carboxymaltose versus ferrous sulfate for iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy: subgroup analysis of Korean women. We performed a post-hoc subgroup analysis in Korean women who participated in the Phase III FER-ASAP (FERric carboxymaltose-Assessment of SAfety and efficacy in Pregnancy) study to compare the efficacy and safety of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) with oral ferrous sulfate (FS).Pregnant Korean women (gestational weeks 16-33) with iron-deficiency anemia

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2018 BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

18. Oral iron absorption test in patients on CAPD: comparison of ferrous sulfate and a polysaccharide ferric complex. (PubMed)

Oral iron absorption test in patients on CAPD: comparison of ferrous sulfate and a polysaccharide ferric complex. We prospectively compared the absorption of ferrous sulfate to that of a polysaccharide ferric complex (Niferex) in 5 healthy controls and 7 stable patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). All study subjects received an equivalent of 150 mg of elemental iron of either preparation, in a random fashion. After a baseline fasting serum iron level was obtained (...) , the serum iron concentration was measured at 2 h in the control group and at 2 and 4 h in the CAPD patients. One to 2 months later, all study subjects received the alternative iron compound and were studied in an identical manner. A significant rise in serum iron was only observed in the healthy subjects after the ingestion of ferrous sulfate and not Niferex (ferrous sulfate 102 +/- (SE) 9 vs. 142 +/- 7 Mg/dl, p = 0.0005; Niferex 96 +/- (SE) 10 vs. 102 +/- 12 mg/dl; baseline vs. 2 h, respectively

1996 Nephron

19. Tolerability of iron: a comparison of bis-glycino iron II and ferrous sulfate. (PubMed)

Tolerability of iron: a comparison of bis-glycino iron II and ferrous sulfate. The tolerability of supplemental iron in the chelated form of bis-glycino iron II was compared with that of ferrous sulfate in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial. Both iron formulations were prepared to deliver 50 mg elemental iron in each capsule; the capsules for both formulations were identical in appearance and weight. Each supplement was taken once daily before breakfast for two weeks. The incidence (...) and severity of adverse side effects were not statistically different for the two preparations. However, of the 38 women evaluated, 14 (37%) experienced moderate-to-severe side effects only while taking the sulfate formulation compared to eight (21%) who experienced similar side effects only while taking the chelate formulation; the remaining 16 women had the same symptom profile with both preparations. This tendency for the chelate to be better tolerated was observed for the symptoms of bloating

1992 Clinical therapeutics

20. Iron supplementation of low-income infants: a randomized clinical trial of adherence with ferrous fumarate sprinkles versus ferrous sulfate drops. (PubMed)

Iron supplementation of low-income infants: a randomized clinical trial of adherence with ferrous fumarate sprinkles versus ferrous sulfate drops. To determine whether low-income infants' adherence to nutritional supplementation with ferrous fumarate sprinkles was better than that with ferrous sulfate drops.The study was a randomized clinical trial of healthy 6-month-old infants. Each infant received either a daily packet of sprinkles or a dropperful of liquid. Follow-up included alternating (...) assessment in the subjects receiving drops, compared with 30% to 46% in those receiving sprinkles. The drops group was more likely to have at least four assessments with high adherence (22% vs 9.5%; P = .03). Caregivers of the drops infants were more likely to report greater than usual fussiness (P < .01); however, fussiness had no consistent impact on adherence.The use of ferrous fumarate sprinkles rather than traditional ferrous sulfate drops did not improve adherence with daily iron supplementation

2009 The Journal of pediatrics