Latest & greatest articles for fatigue

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Top results for fatigue

461. Empirical parenteral antibiotic treatment of patients with fibromyalgia and fatigue and a positive serologic result for Lyme disease

Empirical parenteral antibiotic treatment of patients with fibromyalgia and fatigue and a positive serologic result for Lyme disease Empirical parenteral antibiotic treatment of patients with fibromyalgia and fatigue and a positive serologic result for Lyme disease Empirical parenteral antibiotic treatment of patients with fibromyalgia and fatigue and a positive serologic result for Lyme disease Lightfoot R W, Luft B J, Rahn D W, Steere A C, Sigal L H, Zoschke D C, Gardner P, Britton M C (...) Patients in endemic areas with chronic fatigue and myalgia and a positive serologic result for Lyme disease. Setting Primary care. The study was conducted in the USA. Dates to which data relate Not reported. Source of effectiveness data Review of previous studies. Outcomes assessed in the review False positive rates and toxicity rates due to treatment. Study designs and other criteria for inclusion in the review Decisions on the relevance of the studies were based on the methods followed for patient

1993 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

462. Red blood cell magnesium and chronic fatigue syndrome. (Abstract)

Red blood cell magnesium and chronic fatigue syndrome. The hypotheses that patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have low red blood cell magnesium and that magnesium treatment would improve the wellbeing of such patients were tested in a case-control study and a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, respectively. In the case-control study, 20 patients with CFS had lower red cell magnesium concentrations than did 20 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex, and social

1991 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

463. Acyclovir treatment of the chronic fatigue syndrome. Lack of efficacy in a placebo-controlled trial. (Abstract)

Acyclovir treatment of the chronic fatigue syndrome. Lack of efficacy in a placebo-controlled trial. Twenty-seven adults with a diagnosis of the chronic fatigue syndrome were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of acyclovir therapy. The patients had had debilitating fatigue for an average of 6.8 years, accompanied by persisting antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus early antigens (titers greater than or equal to 1:40) or undetectable levels of antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus (...) the trial, similar numbers improved with acyclovir therapy and with placebo (11 and 10, respectively). Neither acyclovir treatment nor clinical improvement correlated with alterations in laboratory findings, including titers of antibody to Epstein-Barr virus or levels of circulating immune complexes or of leukocyte 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase. Subjective improvement correlated with various measures of mood. We conclude that acyclovir, as used in this study, does not ameliorate the chronic fatigue

1988 NEJM