Latest & greatest articles for epilepsy

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Top results for epilepsy

101. Nephrolithiasis and Nephrocalcinosis From Topiramate Therapy in Children With Epilepsy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Nephrolithiasis and Nephrocalcinosis From Topiramate Therapy in Children With Epilepsy Adults treated with topiramate may develop nephrolithiasis, but its frequency in children on topiramate is unknown. Topiramate inhibits renal carbonic anhydrase, which can lead to renal tubular acidosis and hypercalciuria. We studied 40 consecutive children who initiated topiramate therapy for seizures between January 1997 and February 2003, followed for a mean of 36 months.Serum electrolytes, urinary

2018 Kidney international reports

102. Polysomnographic Aspects of Sleep Architecture on Self-limited Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Polysomnographic Aspects of Sleep Architecture on Self-limited Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Self-limited epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes is the most common paediatric epileptic syndrome, with growing evidence linking it to various degrees and presentations of neuropsychological dysfunction. The objective of this study is to evaluate the possible sleep macro and microstructural alterations in children with this diagnosis. A systematic review (...) in two studies and, in meta-analysis, a longer sleep latency was the most significant finding among epileptic patients. Only one study evaluated sleep microstructure, suggesting possible alterations in cyclic alternating pattern in diagnosed children. Studies evaluating macro and microstructure of sleep in children with self-limited epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes are necessary to a better understanding of mechanisms of the neuropsychologic disturbances that are frequently seen in children

2018 Sleep science (Sao Paulo, Brazil)

103. Five and 10 minute Apgar scores and risks of cerebral palsy and epilepsy: population based cohort study in Sweden. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Five and 10 minute Apgar scores and risks of cerebral palsy and epilepsy: population based cohort study in Sweden. To investigate associations between Apgar score at five and 10 minutes across the entire range of score values (from 0 to 10) and risks of childhood cerebral palsy or epilepsy, and to analyse the effect of changes in Apgar scores from five to 10 minutes after birth in infants born ≥37 completed weeks.Population based cohort study in Sweden, including 1 213 470 non-malformed live (...) singleton infants, born at term between 1999 and 2012. Data on maternal and pregnancy characteristics and diagnoses of cerebral palsy and epilepsy were obtained by individual record linkages of nationwide Swedish registries.Apgar scores at five and 10 minutes.Cerebral palsy and epilepsy diagnosed up to 16 years of age. Adjusted hazard ratios were calculated, along with 95% confidence intervals.1221 (0.1%) children were diagnosed as having cerebral palsy and 3975 (0.3%) as having epilepsy. Compared

2018 BMJ

104. Monarch external Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation System for drug-refractory epilepsy

Monarch external Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation System for drug-refractory epilepsy HealthPACT Health Policy Advisory Committee on Technology Australia and New Zealand Technology Brief 90Y Zevalin for the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (v1.0) August 2011 © State of Queensland (Queensland Health) 2011 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 2.5 Australia licence. In essence, you are free to copy and communicate the work in its current form

2018 COAG Health Council - Horizon Scanning Technology Briefs

105. Neuropsychological outcome after subtemporal versus transsylvian approach for selective amygdalohippocampectomy in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: a randomised prospective clinical trial (Abstract)

Neuropsychological outcome after subtemporal versus transsylvian approach for selective amygdalohippocampectomy in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: a randomised prospective clinical trial To compare the effects of different surgical approaches for selective amygdalohippocampectomy in patients with pharmacoresistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with regard to the neuropsychological outcome and to replicate an earlier study employing a matched-pair design.47 patients were randomised (...) to subtemporal versus transsylvian approaches. Memory, language, attentional and executive functions were assessed before and 1 year after surgery. Multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVAs) with presurgical and postsurgical assessments as within-subject variables and approach and side of surgery as between-subject factors were calculated. Additionally, the frequencies of individual performance changes based on reliable change indices were analysed.Seizure freedom International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE

2018 EvidenceUpdates

106. Cannabidiol in patients with seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (GWPCARE4): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial. (Abstract)

Cannabidiol in patients with seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (GWPCARE4): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial. Patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a rare, severe form of epileptic encephalopathy, are frequently treatment resistant to available medications. No controlled studies have investigated the use of cannabidiol for patients with seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. We therefore assessed the efficacy and safety of cannabidiol (...) as an add-on anticonvulsant therapy in this population of patients.In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial done at 24 clinical sites in the USA, the Netherlands, and Poland, we investigated the efficacy of cannabidiol as add-on therapy for drop seizures in patients with treatment-resistant Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Eligible patients (aged 2-55 years) had Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, including a history of slow (<3 Hz) spike-and-wave patterns on electroencephalogram, evidence of more than

2018 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

107. Losigamone add-on therapy for focal epilepsy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Losigamone add-on therapy for focal epilepsy. Epilepsy is a common neurologic disorder, affecting approximately 50 million people worldwide; nearly a third of these people have epilepsy that is not well controlled by a single antiepileptic drug (AED) and they usually require treatment with a combination of two or more AEDs. In recent years, many newer AEDs have been investigated as add-on therapy for focal epilepsy; losigamone is one of these drugs and is the focus of this systematic review (...) an allowance for multiple testing).Two trials involving a total of 467 participants, aged over 18 years, were eligible for inclusion. Both trials assessed losigamone 1200 mg/day or 1500 mg/day as an add-on therapy for focal epilepsy. We assessed one trial as being of good methodological quality while the other was of uncertain quality. For the efficacy outcomes, results did show that participants taking losigamone were significantly more likely to achieve a 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency (RR

2018 Cochrane

108. Drug management for acute tonic-clonic convulsions including convulsive status epilepticus in children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

situation. We have made many comparisons of drugs and of routes of administration of drugs in this review; our key findings are as follows:(1) This review provides only low- to very low-quality evidence comparing buccal midazolam with rectal diazepam for the treatment of acute tonic-clonic convulsions (risk ratio (RR) for seizure cessation 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13 to 1.38; 4 trials; 690 children). However, there is uncertainty about the effect and therefore insufficient evidence (...) ; moderate-quality evidence).(3) Intramuscular midazolam also showed a similar rate of seizure cessation to intravenous diazepam (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.09; 2 trials; 105 children; low-quality evidence).(4) For intravenous routes of administration, lorazepam appears to be as effective as diazepam in stopping acute tonic clonic convulsions: RR 1.04, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.16; 3 trials; 414 children; low-quality evidence. Furthermore, we found no statistically significant or clinically important differences

2018 Cochrane

109. Study suggests that pre-existing maternal epilepsy increases the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes

nuances of the individual patient and take into account disease severity, antiepileptic drug (AED) type and dose and type and other adverse events (eg, miscarriage and malformations) that are not accounted for by administrative data. Context Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological conditions in pregnancy. Up to 1% of all pregnant women may be epileptic 1 and both seizures and the treatment for seizures, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), have the potential … Request Permissions If you wish to reuse (...) Study suggests that pre-existing maternal epilepsy increases the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes Study suggests that pre-existing maternal epilepsy increases the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts

2018 Evidence-Based Nursing

110. Generalised seizures in children

) of epilepsy and the epilepsy syndrome by recognising a pattern of seizure types, clinical features, and EEG characteristics. Detailed history is of paramount importance in the diagnosis, as key diagnostic factors lie in the history as opposed to ancillary investigations. Main treatment options will depend on the epilepsy syndrome and include anticonvulsants, a ketogenic diet, vagus nerve stimulation, and surgery as well as consideration of lifestyle factors. Definition With the revised and updated (...) and Terminology. Epilepsia. 2017 Apr;58(4):512-21. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28276062?tool=bestpractice.com Fisher RS, Cross JH, French JA, et al. Operational classification of seizure types by the International League Against Epilepsy: position paper of the ILAE Commission for Classification and Terminology. Epilepsia. 2017 Apr;58(4):522-30. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/epi.13670/full http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28276060?tool=bestpractice.com The new ILAE classification presents

2018 BMJ Best Practice

111. Febrile seizure

?tool=bestpractice.com The 2006 report by the International League Against Epilepsy Task Force on Classification and Terminology of Epilepsy and Epileptic Syndromes proposed a change in terminology and the omission of the words 'convulsion' and 'convulsive'. They suggested that the term 'febrile convulsions' be replaced by 'febrile seizures'. Fisher RS, Cross JH, French JA, et al. Operational classification of seizure types by the International League Against Epilepsy: position paper of the ILAE (...) Febrile seizure Febrile seizure - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Febrile seizure Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: January 2019 Summary Febrile seizures are usually self-limiting; an increased risk of developing epilepsy is low except in a small number of cases. Most febrile seizures resolve spontaneously and quickly, and do not require acute or long-term anticonvulsant treatment. Definition

2018 BMJ Best Practice

112. Focal seizures

syndromes. Berg AT, Berkovic SF, Brodie MJ, et al. Revised terminology and concepts for organization of seizures and epilepsies: report of the ILAE Commission on Classification and Terminology, 2005-2009. Epilepsia. 2010 Apr;51(4):676-85. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20196795?tool=bestpractice.com The clinical definition of epilepsy was revised in 2014 to include any of the following conditions: 1) at least two unprovoked seizures occurring >24 hours apart; 2) one unprovoked seizure (...) and a probability of further seizures similar to the general recurrence risk (at least 60%) after two unprovoked seizures, occurring over the next 10 years; 3) diagnosis of an epilepsy syndrome. Fisher RS, Cross JH, French JA, et al. Operational classification of seizure types by the International League Against Epilepsy: position paper of the ILAE Commission for Classification and Terminology. Epilepsia. 2017 Apr;58(4):522-30. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/epi.13670 http

2018 BMJ Best Practice

113. Generalised seizures

diagnosis, most seizure disorders respond to treatment. The primary treatment complications include lack of efficacy and medication side effects or idiosyncratic reactions. Definition A generalised tonic-clonic seizure is a seizure type as identified by specific clinical and electroencephalographic criteria. International League Against Epilepsy. Proposal for revised clinical and electroencephalographic classification of epileptic seizures. Epilepsia. 1981 Aug;22(4):489-501. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov (...) generalised-onset epilepsy or focal epilepsy that has secondarily generalised. Magnetic resonance imaging and an electroencephalogram (EEG) are essential tests for properly diagnosing an epilepsy syndrome after a generalised tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS). During a GTCS, the EEG will demonstrate bilateral synchrony in the epileptiform activity. After a GTCS, treatment depends on the type of epilepsy syndrome identified. Generalised-onset epilepsy is treated differently to focal epilepsy. With proper

2018 BMJ Best Practice

114. Absence seizures

and associated with mental retardation. Atypical absence seizures in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and epilepsy with myoclonic absences are treated with valproate or lamotrigine as first-line therapies. Definition An epileptic seizure is defined as "a transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain". Fisher RS, Acevedo C, Arzimanoglou A, et al. ILAE official report: a practical clinical definition of epilepsy. Epilepsia. 2014 Apr;55(4):475-82 (...) , have minimal, if any, postictal confusion, and are usually precipitated by hyperventilation and sometimes by photic stimulation. They have a classic ictal EEG pattern of bilateral symmetric 3 Hz spike-and-wave with normal interictal background. Epilepsy syndromes with typical absence seizures include childhood absence epilepsy (CAE; characterised by brief absence seizures, usually without convulsions), juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE; characterised by absence seizures with tonic-clonic and, less

2018 BMJ Best Practice

115. Overview of seizure disorder

) seizures occurring more than 24 hours apart One unprovoked (or reflex) seizure and a probability of further seizures similar to the general recurrence risk (at least 60%) after 2 unprovoked seizures, occurring over the next 10 years Diagnosis of an epilepsy syndrome. Epileptic seizures may be classified as focal, generalised, or unknown onset, with subcategories of motor, non-motor (absence), with retained or impaired awareness for focal seizures. Fisher RS, Cross JH, French JA, et al. Operational (...) intervention. EEG shows bisynchronous epileptiform activity in both cerebral hemispheres. Berg AT, Berkovic SF, Brodie MJ, et al. Revised terminology and concepts for organization of seizures and epilepsies: report of the ILAE Commission on Classification and Terminology, 2005-2009. Epilepsia. 2010;51:676-685. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20196795?tool=bestpractice.com GTCS occur in many different types of epilepsy. Anti-epileptic agents are the primary treatment for all types. Bergey GK. Evidence

2018 BMJ Best Practice

116. Management of epilepsy in adults with intellectual disability

International members Special Interest Groups Your monthly eNewsletter Specialty doctors President's lectures Events Conferences and training events In house training International Congress Improving care CCQI Campaigning for better mental health policy Planning the psychiatric workforce National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health Working sustainably Mental health Problems and disorders Support, care and treatment Translations Management of epilepsy in adults with intellectual disability (CR203 May 2017 (...) Management of epilepsy in adults with intellectual disability Management of epilepsy in adults with intellectual disability (CR203 May 2017) This site uses cookies: Search Search Become a psychiatrist Choose psychiatry Medical students Foundation doctors Help us promote psychiatry Training Curricula and guidance Your training Exams Neuroscience in training International Medical Graduates Members Supporting you Submitting your CPD Membership Your Faculties Devolved Nations English Divisions

2018 Royal College of Psychiatrists

117. Prescribing anti-epileptic drugs for people with epilepsy and intellectual disability

Prescribing anti-epileptic drugs for people with epilepsy and intellectual disability Prescribing anti-epileptic drugs for people with epilepsy and intellectual disability (CR206 Oct 2017) This site uses cookies: Search Search Become a psychiatrist Choose psychiatry Medical students Foundation doctors Help us promote psychiatry Training Curricula and guidance Your training Exams Neuroscience in training International Medical Graduates Members Supporting you Submitting your CPD Membership Your (...) Faculties Devolved Nations English Divisions International members Special Interest Groups Your monthly eNewsletter Specialty doctors President's lectures Events Conferences and training events In house training International Congress Improving care CCQI Campaigning for better mental health policy Planning the psychiatric workforce National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health Working sustainably Mental health Problems and disorders Support, care and treatment Translations Prescribing anti-epileptic

2018 Royal College of Psychiatrists

118. Clinical Commissioning Policy: Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Epilepsy

Clinical Commissioning Policy: Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Epilepsy NHS England » Clinical Commissioning Policy: Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Epilepsy (all ages) Search Search Menu Clinical Commissioning Policy: Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Epilepsy (all ages) Document first published: 2 March 2018 Page updated: 2 March 2018 Topic: , Publication type: This policy document outlines the arrangements for funding of Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Epilepsy

2018 NHS England

119. Clinical Commissioning Policy: Everolimus for refractory focal onset seizures associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (ages 2 years and above)

Clinical Commissioning Policy: Everolimus for refractory focal onset seizures associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (ages 2 years and above) NHS England » Clinical Commissioning Policy: Everolimus for refractory focal onset seizures associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (ages 2 years and above) Search Search Menu Clinical Commissioning Policy: Everolimus for refractory focal onset seizures associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (ages 2 years and above) Document first published: 6 (...) July 2018 Page updated: 6 July 2018 Topic: , Publication type: This policy document outlines the arrangements for funding of treatment for refractory focal onset seizures, associated with tuberous sclerosis complex, for ages 2 years and above. Document 21 pages

2018 NHS England

120. Everolimus for refractory focal onset seizures associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (ages 2 years and above)

Everolimus for refractory focal onset seizures associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (ages 2 years and above) NHS England » Everolimus for refractory focal onset seizures associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (ages 2 years and above) Search Search Menu Everolimus for refractory focal onset seizures associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (ages 2 years and above) Document first published: 21 December 2018 Page updated: 21 December 2018 Topic: Publication type: , NHS England (...) will commission everolimus as an add on treatment of people aged 2 and above who have tuberous sclerosis related seizures in accordance with the criteria outlined in this document. In creating this policy NHS England has reviewed this clinical condition and the options for its treatment. It has considered the place of this treatment in current clinical practice, whether scientific research has shown the treatment to be of benefit to patients, (including how any benefit is balanced against possible risks

2018 NHS England