Latest & greatest articles for epilepsy

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on epilepsy and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for epilepsy

1. Ketogenic diets for drug-resistant epilepsy.

Ketogenic diets for drug-resistant epilepsy. BACKGROUND: Ketogenic diets (KDs), being high in fat and low in carbohydrates, have been suggested to reduce seizure frequency in people with epilepsy. At present, such diets are mainly recommended for children who continue to have seizures despite treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (drug-resistant epilepsy). Recently, there has been interest in less restrictive KDs, including the modified Atkins diet (MAD), and the use of these diets has (...) extended into adult practice. This is an update of a review first published in 2003 and last updated in 2016. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of KDs for drug-resistant epilepsy by reviewing the evidence from randomised controlled trials. SEARCH METHODS: For the latest update we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (11 April 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO, 11 April 2017), MEDLINE (Ovid, 11

Cochrane2018

2. Subpial transection surgery for epilepsy.

Subpial transection surgery for epilepsy. BACKGROUND: Nearly 30% of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures despite using several antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Such patients are regarded as having refractory, or uncontrolled, epilepsy. While there is no universally accepted definition of uncontrolled, or medically refractory, epilepsy, for the purposes of this review we will consider seizures as drug resistant if they have failed to respond to a minimum of two AEDs. Specialists consider (...) that early surgical intervention may prevent seizures at a younger age, which in turn may improve the intellectual and social status of children. Many types of surgery are available for treating refractory epilepsy; one such procedure is known as subpial transection. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of subpial transection for focal-onset seizures and generalised tonic-clonic seizures in children and adults. SEARCH METHODS: For the latest update we searched the following databases on 7 August 2018

Cochrane2018

4. A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment

A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment Signal - A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment Published on 12 September 2017 Lamotrigine and levetiracetam are emerging as first-line treatments for epilepsy, which people may be more likely to keep taking than carbamazepine. Reducing the risk of adverse events and treatment (...) withdrawal is important when selecting an anti-epilepsy drug as it usually will need to be taken long-term. This study reviewed evidence on anti-epilepsy drugs in adults and children. The drugs were compared directly or indirectly with each other. The main outcome of interest was time to withdrawal from treatment, which indicates effectiveness and tolerability. The findings support NICE recommendations to use carbamazepine or lamotrigine as first-line therapies for epilepsy with partial seizures

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

5. Cannabis derivative may reduce seizures in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies, but adverse events increase

Cannabis derivative may reduce seizures in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies, but adverse events increase Cannabis derivative may reduce seizures in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies, but adverse events increase Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Cannabis derivative may reduce seizures in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies, but adverse events increase Published on 26 June 2018 doi: In people with some types of severe, drug-resistant epilepsy, adding cannabidiol (...) to their treatment may reduce seizure frequency and improve quality of life compared with a placebo. The likelihood of being free from seizures for more than a year was still low, about 8%. However, serious adverse effects were 12% more likely with cannabidiol. These findings come from a systematic review, which included six trials in 555 patients. Most were children and adolescents with rare forms of epilepsy, and findings may not apply to other forms of the condition. The included trials were poorly reported

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

6. Carbamazepine versus phenobarbitone monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review.

Carbamazepine versus phenobarbitone monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. BACKGROUND: This is an updated version of the Cochrane Review previously published in 2016. This review is one in a series of Cochrane Reviews investigating pair-wise monotherapy comparisons.Epilepsy is a common neurological condition in which abnormal electrical discharges from the brain cause recurrent unprovoked seizures. It is believed that with effective drug treatment, up to 70 (...) % of individuals with active epilepsy have the potential to become seizure-free and go into long-term remission shortly after starting drug therapy with a single antiepileptic drug in monotherapy.Worldwide, carbamazepine and phenobarbitone are commonly used broad-spectrum antiepileptic drugs, suitable for most epileptic seizure types. Carbamazepine is a current first-line treatment for focal onset seizures, and is used in the USA and Europe. Phenobarbitone is no longer considered a first-line treatment because

Cochrane2018

7. Gabapentin add-on treatment for drug-resistant focal epilepsy.

Gabapentin add-on treatment for drug-resistant focal epilepsy. BACKGROUND: This is an updated version of the Cochrane Review previously published in 2013.Most people with epilepsy have a good prognosis and their seizures are well controlled by a single antiepileptic drug, but up to 30% develop drug-resistant epilepsy, especially those with focal seizures. In this review, we summarised the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of gabapentin, when used as an add-on treatment for drug (...) -resistant focal epilepsy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of gabapentin when used as an add-on treatment for people with drug-resistant focal epilepsy. SEARCH METHODS: For the latest update, we searched the Cochrane Register of Studies (CRS Web, 20 March 2018), which includes the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 20 March 2018), ClinicalTrials.gov (20 March 2018) and the World

Cochrane2018

8. Oxcarbazepine versus phenytoin monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review.

Oxcarbazepine versus phenytoin monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. BACKGROUND: This is an updated version of the Cochrane Review previously published in 2013. This review is one in a series of Cochrane Reviews investigating pair-wise monotherapy comparisons.Epilepsy is a common neurological condition in which abnormal electrical discharges from the brain cause recurrent unprovoked seizures. It is believed that with effective drug treatment, up to 70% of individuals (...) with active epilepsy have the potential to become seizure-free and go into long-term remission shortly after starting drug therapy with a single antiepileptic drug in monotherapy.Worldwide, phenytoin is a commonly used antiepileptic drug. It is important to know how newer drugs, such as oxcarbazepine, compare with commonly used standard treatments. OBJECTIVES: To review the time to treatment failure, remission and first seizure with oxcarbazepine compared to phenytoin, when used as monotherapy in people

Cochrane2018

9. Zonisamide add-on therapy for focal epilepsy.

Zonisamide add-on therapy for focal epilepsy. BACKGROUND: The majority of people with epilepsy have a good prognosis, and their seizures can be well controlled with the use of a single antiepileptic agent, but up to 30% develop refractory epilepsy, especially those with focal seizures. In this review, we summarised the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCT) of zonisamide, used as an add-on treatment for focal epilepsy uncontrolled by one or more concomitant antiepileptic drug (...) . This is an updated version of the Cochrane review previously published in 2013. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of zonisamide, when used as an add-on treatment for people with focal epilepsy uncontrolled by one or more concomitant antiepileptic drugs. SEARCH METHODS: For this update, on 4 September 2017, we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Register of Studies Online, MEDLINE Ovid, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry

Cochrane2018

10. Vigabatrin (Kigabeq) - epilepsy in children between 1 month and 7 years of age

Vigabatrin (Kigabeq) - epilepsy in children between 1 month and 7 years of age Kigabeq | European Medicines Agency Search Search Menu Kigabeq vigabatrin Table of contents Authorised This medicine is authorised for use in the European Union. Overview Kigabeq is a medicine for treating epilepsy in children between 1 month and 7 years of age. It is used in the following ways: on its own to treat infantile spasms (West syndrome), a rare epilepsy disorder that starts at a very young age, usually (...) in the first few months of life; together with other medicines to treat partial epilepsy (seizures affecting one part of the brain), including when the seizures spread to other parts of the brain and become more generalised. Kigabeq is only used in partial epilepsy when patients have already tried all other appropriate treatments or cannot use them because of side effects. Kigabeq contains the vigabatrin and is a ‘ ’. This means that it is similar to a ‘reference medicine’ containing the same , but Kigabeq

European Medicines Agency - EPARs2018

11. Sodium valproate versus phenytoin monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review.

Sodium valproate versus phenytoin monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. BACKGROUND: Epilepsy is a common neurological condition in which abnormal electrical discharges from the brain cause recurrent unprovoked seizures. It is believed that with effective drug treatment up to 70% of individuals with active epilepsy have the potential to become seizure-free, and to go into long-term remission shortly after starting drug therapy with a single antiepileptic drug (...) , and updated in 2013 and 2016. OBJECTIVES: To review the time to treatment failure, remission and first seizure of sodium valproate compared to phenytoin when used as monotherapy in people with focal onset seizures or generalised tonic-clonic seizures (with or without other generalised seizure types). SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization (WHO

Cochrane2018

12. Epilepsy

Epilepsy Top results for epilepsy - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice My query is: English Français Deutsch Čeština Español Magyar Svenska ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing (...) the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for epilepsy The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines

Trip Latest and Greatest2018

13. Cognitive-behavioural therapy does not meaningfully reduce depression in most people with epilepsy: a systematic review of clinically reliable improvement

Cognitive-behavioural therapy does not meaningfully reduce depression in most people with epilepsy: a systematic review of clinically reliable improvement 29735512 2018 05 08 1468-330X 2018 May 07 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatry Cognitive - behavioural therapy does not meaningfully reduce depression in most people with epilepsy: a systematic review of clinically reliable improvement. jnnp-2018-317997 10.1136/jnnp-2018-317997 Psychological (...) treatment is recommended for depression and anxiety in those with epilepsy. This review used standardised criteria to evaluate, for the first time, the clinical relevance of any symptom change these treatments afford patients. Databases were searched until March 2017 for relevant trials in adults. Trial quality was assessed and trial authors asked for individual participants' pre-treatment and post-treatment distress data. Jacobson's methodology determined the proportion in the different trial arms

EvidenceUpdates2018

14. Practice guideline update summary: Efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs I: Treatment of new-onset epilepsy: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and th

Practice guideline update summary: Efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs I: Treatment of new-onset epilepsy: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and th 29898971 2018 07 10 1526-632X 91 2 2018 Jul 10 Neurology Neurology Practice guideline update summary: Efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs I: Treatment of new-onset epilepsy: Report of the Guideline Development (...) , Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society. 74-81 10.1212/WNL.0000000000005755 To update the 2004 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) guideline for treating new-onset focal or generalized epilepsy with second- and third-generation antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The 2004 AAN criteria were used to systematically review literature (January 2003-November 2015), classify pertinent studies according to the therapeutic rating scheme, and link

EvidenceUpdates2018

15. Practice guideline update summary: Efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs II: Treatment-resistant epilepsy: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the

Practice guideline update summary: Efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs II: Treatment-resistant epilepsy: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the 29898974 2018 07 10 1526-632X 91 2 2018 Jul 10 Neurology Neurology Practice guideline update summary: Efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs II: Treatment-resistant epilepsy: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination (...) , and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society. 82-90 10.1212/WNL.0000000000005756 To update the 2004 American Academy of Neurology guideline for managing treatment-resistant (TR) epilepsy with second- and third-generation antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). 2004 criteria were used to systemically review literature (January 2003 to November 2015), classify pertinent studies according to the therapeutic rating scheme, and link recommendations to evidence strength

EvidenceUpdates2018

16. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of resective surgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

Systematic review and network meta-analysis of resective surgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy 29769251 2018 05 17 1468-330X 2018 May 16 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatry Systematic review and network meta-analysis of resective surgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. jnnp-2017-317783 10.1136/jnnp-2017-317783 To evaluate the effectiveness of anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) versus selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) on seizure-free (...) outcome in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, using both direct and indirect evidence from the literature. MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for original research articles and systematic reviews comparing ATL versus SAH, and ATL or SAH versus medical management (MM). The outcome was seizure freedom at 12 months of follow-up or longer. Direct pairwise meta-analyses were conducted, followed by a random-effect Bayesian network meta-analysis (NMA) combining direct and indirect

EvidenceUpdates2018

17. Lamotrigine versus carbamazepine monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review.

Lamotrigine versus carbamazepine monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. BACKGROUND: This is an updated version of the original Cochrane Review published in Issue 11, 2006 of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.Epilepsy is a common neurological condition in which abnormal electrical discharges from the brain cause recurrent unprovoked seizures. It is believed that with effective drug treatment up to 70% of individuals with active epilepsy have the potential (...) (simple or complex focal and secondarily generalised) or generalised onset tonic-clonic seizures (with or without other generalised seizure types). SEARCH METHODS: We conducted the first searches for this review in 1997. For the most recent update, we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO), MEDLINE, Clinical Trials.gov and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry

Cochrane2018

18. Eslicarbazepine acetate (Zebinix) - treatment of partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy

Eslicarbazepine acetate (Zebinix) - treatment of partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy Non Submission eslicarbazepine acetate 200mg and 800mg tablets (Zebinix ® ) SMC2090 Eisai Ltd 4 May 2018 ADVICE: in the absence of a submission from the holder of the marketing authorisation eslicarbazepine acetate (Zebinix ® ) is not recommended for use within NHS Scotland. Indication under review: As monotherapy in the treatment of partial (...) -onset seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy. The holder of the marketing authorisation has not made a submission to SMC regarding this product in this setting. As a result we cannot recommend its use within NHSScotland. Advice context: No part of this advice may be used without the whole of the advice being quoted in full. This advice represents the view of the Scottish Medicines Consortium. It is provided to inform the considerations of Area

Scottish Medicines Consortium2018