Latest & greatest articles for epilepsy

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on epilepsy or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on epilepsy and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for epilepsy

1. Vagal nerve stimulation for epilepsy and depression

Vagal nerve stimulation for epilepsy and depression Vagal nerve stimulation for epilepsy and depression | Washington State Health Care Authority Toggle search Toggle navigation Announcement Menu Apple Health Eligibility Manual Search Close menu Search form Search all of HCA Search Health care services and supports Search Billers, providers, & partners Search Employee & retiree benefits Search About HCA Search Vagal nerve stimulation for epilepsy and depression Vagal nerve stimulation (...) for epilepsy and depression Public comment period extended. Public comment on the vagal nerve stimulation draft report has been extended until close of business, March 30, 2020. Submit all comments to: Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) for epilepsy and depression was first reviewed by the HTA in 2009. In 2013, a review of VNS medical literature was conducted to determine if newly available evidence published since 2008 was likely to change the original coverage determination. The technology was not selected

2020 Washington Health Care Authority

2. MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy

is a neurological condition characterised by episodes of abnormal electrical activity in the brain (recurrent seizures). The seizures can be focal or generalised. Current treatments Current treatments 2.2 The main treatment for epilepsy is antiepileptic drugs taken to prevent or reduce the occurrence of seizures. However, many people with epilepsy have drug-resistant epilepsy, which is refractory to drug treatment (estimates vary between 20% and 40% of people with epilepsy). They have frequent seizures (...) or neurological deficit, gait disturbance, visual field deficits, cognitive deficit or psychiatric disturbance, and amnestic disorder. 3.4 Patient commentary was sought but none was received. Committee comments Committee comments 3.5 The committee noted that, in adults, the procedure has primarily been used to treat temporal lobe epilepsy. In children it has primarily been used for hypothalamic hamartomas. 3.6 The committee was informed that the procedure is much less invasive than open surgery. MRI-guided

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Interventional Procedures

3. Models of community-based primary care for epilepsy in low- and middle-income countries

: The 24 reports identified comprise mostly care programs addressing active convulsive epilepsy. Phenobarbital has been used most frequently, although other conventional antiseizure medications (ASMs) have also been used, but none of the newer. Tolerability rates in these studies are high, but overall attrition is considerable. Other approaches include updating primary health care providers, reinforcing treatment adherence in clinics, and raising community awareness. In these programs, the coverage (...) of existing treatment gap in the community, epilepsy-related mortality, and comorbidity burden are only fleetingly addressed. None, however, explicitly describe sustainability plans. Conclusions: Cost-free provision, mostly of phenobarbital, has resulted in short-term seizure freedom in roughly half of the people with epilepsy in low- and middle-income countries. Future programs should include a range of ASMs. These should cover apart from seizure control and treatment adherence, primary health care

2020 EvidenceUpdates

4. Cannabidiol with clobazam for treating seizures associated with Lennox–Gastaut syndrome

–Gastaut syndrome treatment pathway is consistent with NICE's clinical guideline on epilepsies: diagnosis and management. The guideline recommends starting treatment with sodium valproate and, if seizures are not adequately controlled, adding lamotrigine. They added that they would consider trying other antiepileptic drugs if sodium valproate and lamotrigine together do not adequately control seizures. The committee was aware that the marketing authorisation for cannabidiol is for use as an adjuvant (...) Cannabidiol with clobazam for treating seizures associated with Lennox–Gastaut syndrome Cannabidiol with clobazam for treating seizures associated with Lennox–Gastaut syndrome T echnology appraisal guidance Published: 18 December 2019 www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ta615 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guidance represent the view of NICE

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals

5. Cannabidiol with clobazam for treating seizures associated with Dravet syndrome

having fewer nights with seizures, when there is a higher risk of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. The patient and carer expert considered that reducing the duration of convulsive seizures and the frequency of other seizure types would improve the quality of life of people with Dravet syndrome. The committee concluded that there is an unmet need for treatments that reduce the number and duration of convulsive seizures, and that patients and their carers would value a new treatment option (...) convulsive seizures were less likely to die from epilepsy-related causes, and people taking cannabidiol were more likely to be free from convulsive seizures. The company used an Cannabidiol with clobazam for treating seizures associated with Dravet syndrome (TA614) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 16 of 25observational study of people with epilepsy (Trinka et al. 2013) to model a 58% reduction in risk

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals

6. Cenobamate (Xcopri) - partial onset seizures

Cenobamate (Xcopri) - partial onset seizures Drug Approval Package: XCOPRI XCOPRI " /> U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Search FDA Submit search Drug Approval Package: XCOPRI Company: SK Life Science, Inc. Application Number: 212839 Approval Date: 11/21/2019 Persons with disabilities having problems accessing the PDF files below may call (301) 796-3634 for assistance. FDA Approval Letter and Labeling (PDF) (PDF) FDA Application Review Files (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF

2020 FDA - Drug Approval Package

7. Safety and efficacy of adjunctive cenobamate (YKP3089) in patients with uncontrolled focal seizures: a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, dose-response trial (Abstract)

Safety and efficacy of adjunctive cenobamate (YKP3089) in patients with uncontrolled focal seizures: a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, dose-response trial More than a third of patients with epilepsy are treatment resistant, and thus new, more effective therapies to achieve seizure freedom are needed. Cenobamate (YKP3089), an investigational antiepileptic drug, has shown broad-spectrum anticonvulsant activity in preclinical studies and seizure models. We aimed (...) to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of adjunctive cenobamate in patients with uncontrolled focal (partial)-onset epilepsy.We did a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, dose-response study at 107 epilepsy and neurology centres in 16 countries. Adult patients (aged 18-70 years) with focal seizures despite treatment with 1-3 antiepileptic drugs were randomly assigned (1:1:1:1) via an interactive web response system, by block sizes of 4 within each country, to adjuvant

2019 EvidenceUpdates

8. Evaluation of Long-term Risk of Epilepsy, Psychiatric Disorders, and Mortality Among Children With Recurrent Febrile Seizures: A National Cohort Study in Denmark (Abstract)

Evaluation of Long-term Risk of Epilepsy, Psychiatric Disorders, and Mortality Among Children With Recurrent Febrile Seizures: A National Cohort Study in Denmark Febrile seizures occur in 2% to 5% of children between the ages of 3 months and 5 years. Many affected children experience recurrent febrile seizures. However, little is known about the association between recurrent febrile seizures and subsequent prognosis.To estimate the risk of recurrent febrile seizures and whether (...) there is an association over long-term follow-up between recurrent febrile seizures and epilepsy, psychiatric disorders, and death in a large, nationwide, population-based cohort in Denmark.This population-based cohort study evaluated data from all singleton children born in Denmark between January 1, 1977, and December 31, 2011, who were identified through the Danish Civil Registration System. Children born in Denmark who were alive and residing in Denmark at age 3 months were included (N = 2 103 232). The study

2019 EvidenceUpdates

9. Neonatal seizures

• A range of genetic disorders causing epilepsy syndromes e.g. early onset epileptic encephalopathy; Ohtahara syndrome Developmental/ congenital • Abnormality of brain development 8 Queensland Clinical Guideline: Neonatal seizures Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 11 of 32 2.3 Presentation Neonatal seizures evolve over time. The peak incidence occurs between 12 and 24 hours of age but the time of onset is dependent on aetiology and treatment. Often the seizures cease by 72 (...) maintenance treatment for genetic and metabolic disorders usually lifelong 42,57 • Treatment usually continued if there is known progress to epilepsy (e.g. structural brain malformations and neonatal epilepsy syndromes) Queensland Clinical Guideline: Neonatal seizures Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 20 of 32 6.1 Anti-epileptic drugs 6.1.1 Phenobarbital Table 14. Phenobarbital Phenobarbital* Dose and administration • First line treatment • May be diluted to 10 mg/mL in 0.9

2019 Queensland Health

11. CRACKCast E206 – Seizures

with another episode of CRACKCast. Today, we will be covering the topic of seizures. This content is exceedingly important, as approximately 10% of adults will experience at least one seizure. Additionally, 3% of all persons will be diagnosed with epilepsy, thus further reinforcing the importance of knowing this content. Today, we will go about diving into the nitty gritty of seizure disorders, giving you the knowledge to differentiate between neurogenic seizures, psychogenic seizures, and seizure mimics (...) psychogenic seizures when the patient is mid-episode is impossible. Additionally, anywhere from 5-50% of all patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures ALSO HAVE EPILEPSY, further complicating treatment, investigation, and disposition of these patients. There are features classically described in the literature that can help you differentiate between psychogenic and neurogenic seizures, and we have listed them in the table below. Just remember, it is not always as clear cut as we would like

2019 CandiEM

12. Lacosamide - epilepsy medicine used to treat partial-onset seizures

) An overview of Lacosamide UCB and why it is authorised in the EU What is Lacosamide UCB and what is it used for? Lacosamide UCB is an epilepsy medicine used to treat partial-onset seizures (epileptic fits starting in one specific part of the brain) in patients with epilepsy aged 4 years or older. It can be used to treat partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalisation (where the seizure subsequently spreads to other parts of the brain). Lacosamide UCB is given on its own or combined (...) does Lacosamide UCB work? The active substance in Lacosamide UCB, lacosamide, is an epilepsy medicine. Epilepsy is caused by excessive electrical activity in the brain. The exact way in which lacosamide works is still unclear but it seems to reduce the activity of sodium channels (pores on the surface of nerve cells) that allow electrical impulses to be transmitted between nerve cells. This action may prevent abnormal electrical activity in the brain, reducing the chance of an epileptic fit. What

2019 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

13. Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Epilepsy and/or Brain Tumours: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness

, medically-intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. Relative to patients who were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery and craniotomy, patients treated with LITT appeared to experience fewer adverse events and complications. No comparative evidence on disease progression, overall survival, hospitalization, or quality of life was found. None of the studies reported on the incidence of epileptic episodes, post-operative pain, use of medication, or hospital readmissions. A Markov model-based economic analysis (...) Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Epilepsy and/or Brain Tumours: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Epilepsy and/or Brain Tumours: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Epilepsy and/or Brain Tumours: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Epilepsy and/or Brain Tumours

2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

14. Epilepsy among Pediatric Patients: The Use of Cannabidiol and Potential Impacts on Quality of Life

to low self-esteem, anxiety, depression, impaired memory and attention, lack of independence, and social stigma. Controlling seizures and their negative sequelae can be challenging in those with early onset epilepsy as they are often refractory to standard therapies. A further challenge is that all currently available anti-epileptic drugs have been shown to cause adverse cognitive effects and a certain degree of toxicity. However, cannabidiol (CBD), an agent found in cannabis, has been proven (...) effective in reducing seizures in those with severe epilepsy, and has a lower side effect profile than standard treatments. This systematic literature review explores the potential impact of cannabidiol in improving quality of life (QOL) factors among pediatric patients with severe forms of epilepsy with respect to seizure control, alertness, mood/behavior, and language. Methods: An exhaustive literature search was performed using MEDLINEOvid, Web of Science, and Clinical Key. Keywords included

2019 Pacific University EBM Capstone Project

15. Pharmacogenetic testing to identify the risk of adverse reactions to anti-epileptic medications.

Pharmacogenetic testing to identify the risk of adverse reactions to anti-epileptic medications. Pharmacogenetic testing - Health Technology Wales > Pharmacogenetic testing Pharmacogenetic testing Topic Status Complete Pharmacogenetic testing to identify the risk of adverse reactions to anti-epileptic medications. Outcome The evidence on the use of pharmacogenetics testing to identify the risk of adverse reactions to anti-epileptic medications is limited. Some evidence was identified on the use (...) of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) testing to determine whether carbamazepine treatment should be prescribed. However, expert opinion suggests that carbamazepine is no longer offered as first-line treatment and people with newly diagnosed epilepsy are instead offered a drug with a lower rate of adverse drug reactions. As such, this testing approach may be of limited applicability to current practice. The HTW Assessment Group concluded that informed guidance could not be made at this time. Why

2019 Health Technology Wales

16. Sulthiame add-on therapy for epilepsy. (Abstract)

Sulthiame add-on therapy for epilepsy. This is an updated version of the Cochrane Review previously published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2015, Issue 10. Epilepsy is a common neurological condition, characterised by recurrent seizures. Most people respond to conventional antiepileptic drugs, however, around 30% will continue to experience seizures, despite treatment with multiple antiepileptic drugs. Sulthiame, also known as sultiame, is a widely used antiepileptic drug (...) infants with newly diagnosed West syndrome. This trial was funded by DESITIN Pharma, Germany. During the study, sulthiame was given as an add-on therapy to pyridoxine. No data were reported for the outcomes: 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency between baseline and end of follow-up; mean seizure frequency; or quality of life. For complete cessation of seizures during a nine-day follow-up period for add-on sulthiame versus placebo, the RR was 11.14 (95% CI 0.67 to 184.47; very low-certainty

2019 Cochrane

17. Perampanel (Fycompa) - for the adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures with or without secondarily generalised seizures in adult and adolescent patients from 12 years of age with epilepsy.

Perampanel (Fycompa) - for the adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures with or without secondarily generalised seizures in adult and adolescent patients from 12 years of age with epilepsy. Published 12 August 2019 1 Product update SMC2172 perampanel 0.5mg/mL oral suspension (Fycompa®) Eisai Ltd 5 July 2019 The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) has completed its assessment of the above product and advises NHS Boards and Area Drug and Therapeutic Committees (ADTCs) on its use (...) in NHSScotland. The advice is summarised as follows: ADVICE: following an abbreviated submission perampanel (Fycompa®) is accepted for restricted use within NHSScotland. Indication under review: for the adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures with or without secondarily generalised seizures in adult and adolescent patients from 12 years of age with epilepsy. SMC restriction: use as a second-line adjunctive treatment in patients with refractory partial onset epilepsy who are unable to swallow

2019 Scottish Medicines Consortium

18. Perampanel (Fycompa) - for the adjunctive treatment of primary generalised tonic-clonic seizures in adult and adolescent patients from 12 years of age with idiopathic generalised epilepsy.

Perampanel (Fycompa) - for the adjunctive treatment of primary generalised tonic-clonic seizures in adult and adolescent patients from 12 years of age with idiopathic generalised epilepsy. Published 12 August 2019 www.scottishmedicines.org.uk Statement of advice SMC2218 perampanel 0.5mg/mL oral suspension (Fycompa®) Eisai Ltd 5 July 2019 Advice context: No part of this advice may be used without the whole of the advice being quoted in full. This advice represents the view of the Scottish (...) with the patient and/or guardian or carer. Chairman Scottish Medicines Consortium ADVICE: in the absence of a submission from the holder of the marketing authorisation perampanel (Fycompa®) is not recommended for use within NHSScotland. Indication under review: for the adjunctive treatment of primary generalised tonic-clonic seizures in adult and adolescent patients from 12 years of age with idiopathic generalised epilepsy. The holder of the marketing authorisation has not made a submission to SMC regarding

2019 Scottish Medicines Consortium

19. Felbamate add-on therapy for drug-resistant focal epilepsy. (Abstract)

Felbamate add-on therapy for drug-resistant focal epilepsy. This is an updated version of the Cochrane Review previously published in 2017.Epilepsy is a chronic and disabling neurological disorder, affecting approximately 1% of the population. Up to 30% of people with epilepsy have seizures that are resistant to currently available antiepileptic drugs and require treatment with multiple antiepileptic drugs in combination. Felbamate is a second-generation antiepileptic drug that can be used (...) to search for additional reports of relevant studies. We also contacted the manufacturers of felbamate and experts in the field for information about any unpublished or ongoing studies.We searched for randomised placebo-controlled add-on studies of people of any age with drug-resistant focal seizures. The studies could be double-blind, single-blind or unblinded and could be of parallel-group or cross-over design.Two review authors independently selected studies for inclusion and extracted information

2019 Cochrane

20. Phenobarbitone versus phenytoin monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. (Abstract)

Phenobarbitone versus phenytoin monotherapy for epilepsy: an individual participant data review. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2001, and last updated in 2013. This review is one in a series of Cochrane Reviews investigating pair-wise monotherapy comparisons.Epilepsy is a common neurological condition in which abnormal electrical discharges from the brain cause recurrent unprovoked seizures. It is believed that with effective drug treatment, up to 70% of individuals (...) with active epilepsy have the potential to become seizure-free and go into long-term remission shortly after starting drug therapy with a single antiepileptic drug in monotherapy.Worldwide, particularly in the developing world, phenytoin and phenobarbitone are commonly used antiepileptic drugs, primarily because they are inexpensive. The aim of this review is to summarise data from existing trials comparing phenytoin and phenobarbitone.To review the time to treatment failure, remission and first seizure

2019 Cochrane