Latest & greatest articles for doxycycline

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Top results for doxycycline

1. Doxycycline

Doxycycline Top results for doxycycline - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4 (...) ) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for doxycycline The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

2. Doxycycline for outpatient-treated acute exacerbations of COPD: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial. (Abstract)

Doxycycline for outpatient-treated acute exacerbations of COPD: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Antibiotics do not reduce mortality or short-term treatment non-response in patients receiving treatment for acute exacerbations of COPD in an outpatient setting. However, the long-term effects of antibiotics are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate if the antibiotic doxycycline added to the oral corticosteroid prednisolone prolongs time to next exacerbation (...) exacerbation during the past 3 years. Exclusion criteria were poor mastery of the Dutch language, poor cognitive functioning, known allergy to doxycycline, pregnancy, and a life expectancy of shorter than 1 month. If a participant had an exacerbation, we randomly assigned them (1:1; with permuted blocks of variable sizes [ranging from two to ten]; stratified by GOLD stage 1-2 vs 3) to a 7 day course of oral doxycycline 100 mg daily (200 mg on the first day) or placebo. Exclusion criteria for randomisation

2018 The lancet. Respiratory medicine Controlled trial quality: predicted high

3. Trial of Azithromycin vs. Doxycycline for the Treatment of Rectal Chlamydia in MSM

Trial of Azithromycin vs. Doxycycline for the Treatment of Rectal Chlamydia in MSM Trial of Azithromycin vs. Doxycycline for the Treatment of Rectal Chlamydia in MSM - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before (...) adding more. Trial of Azithromycin vs. Doxycycline for the Treatment of Rectal Chlamydia in MSM The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03608774 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted : August 1, 2018 Last

2018 Clinical Trials

4. Treatment effectiveness of azithromycin and doxycycline in uncomplicated rectal and vaginal Chlamydia trachomatis infections in women: a multicentre observational study (FemCure). Full Text available with Trip Pro

Treatment effectiveness of azithromycin and doxycycline in uncomplicated rectal and vaginal Chlamydia trachomatis infections in women: a multicentre observational study (FemCure). Rectal infections with Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) are prevalent in women visiting a sexually transmitted infection (STI) outpatient clinic, but it remains unclear what the most effective treatment is. We assessed the effectiveness of doxycycline and azithromycin for the treatment of rectal and vaginal chlamydia (...) in women.This study is part of a prospective multicentre cohort study (FemCure). Treatment consisted of doxycycline (100 mg twice daily for 7 days) in rectal CT positive women, and of azithromycin (1 g single dose) in vaginal positive women who were rectally untested or rectally negative. Participants self-collected rectal and vaginal samples at enrolment (treatment timepoint) and during 4 weeks of follow-up. The endpoint was microbiological cure by a negative nucleic acid amplification test at 4 weeks

2019 Clinical Infectious Diseases

5. Subantimicrobial-Dose Doxycycline (SDD) Periodontal therapy reduces serum biomarkers of systemic inflammation and can increase high-density lipoprotein

Subantimicrobial-Dose Doxycycline (SDD) Periodontal therapy reduces serum biomarkers of systemic inflammation and can increase high-density lipoprotein UTCAT856, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Subantimicrobial-Dose Doxycycline (SDD) Periodontal Therapy Reduces Serum Biomarkers Of Systemic Inflammation And Can Increase High-Density Lipoprotein Clinical Question In post-menopausal women with chronic (...) periodontitis does a systemic dose of Doxycycline in comparison to placebo increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels? Clinical Bottom Line In post-menopausal women with chronic periodontitis Subantimicrobial-Dose Doxycycline Periodontal therapy reduces serum biomarkers of systemic inflammation and among women more than five years post-menopausal, the SDD regimen elevated their level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. (See Comments on the CAT below) Best Evidence (you may view more info

2011 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

6. Ciprofloxacin or Doxycycline for the Treatment of Anthrax: A Review of the Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness

Ciprofloxacin or Doxycycline for the Treatment of Anthrax: A Review of the Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Disclaimer: The Rapid Response Service is an information service for those involved in planning and providing health care in Canada. Rapid responses are based on a limited literature search and are not comprehensive, systematic reviews. The intent is to provide a list of sources and a summary of the best evidence on the topic that CADTH could identify using all reasonable efforts within (...) is given to CADTH. Links: This report may contain links to other information available on the websites of third parties on the Internet. CADTH does not have control over the content of such sites. Use of third party sites is governed by the owners’ own terms and conditions. TITLE: Ciprofloxacin or Doxycycline for the Treatment of Anthrax: A Review of the Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness DATE: 27 November 2012 CONTEXT AND POLICY ISSUES The potential use of anthrax as a biological terrorist attack has

2013 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

7. Q fever bioprosthetic aortic valve endocarditis (PVE) successfully treated with doxycycline monotherapy. (Abstract)

Q fever bioprosthetic aortic valve endocarditis (PVE) successfully treated with doxycycline monotherapy. Q fever is a zoonotic infection caused by Coxiella burnetii. The most common clinical manifestation of acute Q fever infection is as an atypical community-acquired pneumonia. The pulmonary findings are accompanied by extrapulmonary findings, most typically an increase in serum transaminases and splenomegaly. Because C. burnetii is difficult to culture, the diagnosis of Q fever is usually (...) endocarditis that was successfully treated with doxycycline monotherapy that did not require aortic valve replacement.

2008 Heart & Lung

8. Efficacy of short-term adjunctive subantimicrobial dose doxycycline in diabetic patients--randomized study. (Abstract)

Efficacy of short-term adjunctive subantimicrobial dose doxycycline in diabetic patients--randomized study. To investigate the effectiveness of short-term adjunctive subantimicrobial dose doxycycline (SDD) treatment in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and chronic periodontitis (CP).Thirty-four patients with CP and type 2 diabetes mellitus were included in the placebo-controlled, double-blind study. After scaling and root planing (SRP), patients were randomly assigned to two groups

2012 Oral diseases Controlled trial quality: uncertain

9. Short and Long Term Outcomes of Doxycycline Versus Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections Treatment

Short and Long Term Outcomes of Doxycycline Versus Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections Treatment Short and Long Term Outcomes of Doxycycline Versus Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections Treatment - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached (...) the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Short and Long Term Outcomes of Doxycycline Versus Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections Treatment The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our

2018 Clinical Trials

10. Randomized, open-label, multicenter study of azithromycin compared with doxycycline for treating anorectal Chlamydia trachomatis infection concomitant to a vaginal infection (CHLAZIDOXY study). Full Text available with Trip Pro

Randomized, open-label, multicenter study of azithromycin compared with doxycycline for treating anorectal Chlamydia trachomatis infection concomitant to a vaginal infection (CHLAZIDOXY study). Chlamydia trachomatis can lead to a persistent infection in the lower gastrointestinal tract, suggesting a potential role of autoinoculation of cervical chlamydial infection from the rectal site, contributing to repeat infections. Moreover, around 75% of women with urogenital C. trachomatis have (...) concurrent anorectal infection. Current treatment guidelines for urogenital C. trachomatis infection recommend either a single 1 g dose of azithromycin or doxycycline 100 mg twice daily for 7 days. Doxycycline appears to be more effective in treating anorectal infections as suggested in a population of men who have sex with men, but no randomized controlled trial (RCT) had directly compared azithromycin with doxycycline for the treatment of rectal infections. We propose an open-label RCT to compare

2019 Medicine Controlled trial quality: predicted high

11. Treatment efficacy of azithromycin 1 g single dose versus doxycycline 100 mg twice daily for 7 days for the treatment of rectal chlamydia among men who have sex with men - a double-blind randomised controlled trial protocol. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Treatment efficacy of azithromycin 1 g single dose versus doxycycline 100 mg twice daily for 7 days for the treatment of rectal chlamydia among men who have sex with men - a double-blind randomised controlled trial protocol. Rectal infection with Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the most common bacterial sexually transmissible infections among men who have sex with men (MSM) with diagnosis rates continuing to rise. Current treatment guidelines recommend either azithromycin 1 g single dose (...) or doxycycline 100 mg twice daily for 7 days. However, there are increasing concerns about treatment failure with azithromycin. We are conducting the first randomised controlled trial (RCT) to compare treatment efficacy of azithromycin versus doxycycline for the treatment of rectal chlamydia in MSM.The Rectal Treatment Study will recruit 700 MSM attending Australian sexual health clinics for the treatment of rectal chlamydia. Participants will be asked to provide rectal swabs and will be randomised to either

2017 BMC Infectious Diseases Controlled trial quality: predicted high

12. Doxycycline compared with azithromycin for treating women with genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections: an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis

Doxycycline compared with azithromycin for treating women with genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections: an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis Doxycycline compared with azithromycin for treating women with genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections: an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis Doxycycline compared with azithromycin for treating women with genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections: an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis Magid D, Douglas J, Schwartz S Record Status (...) . Doxycycline compared with azithromycin for treating women with genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections: an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis. Annals of Internal Medicine 1996; 124(4): 389-399 PubMedID Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Analysis of Variance; Azithromycin /administration & Chlamydia Infections /drug therapy /economics; Chlamydia trachomatis; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Decision Trees; Doxycycline /administration & Drug Administration Schedule; Female; Genital Diseases

1996 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

13. Azithromycin versus doxycycline for genital chlamydial infections: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

Azithromycin versus doxycycline for genital chlamydial infections: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials Azithromycin versus doxycycline for genital chlamydial infections: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials Azithromycin versus doxycycline for genital chlamydial infections: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials Lau C Y, Qureshi A K Authors' objectives To evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of azithromycin versus doxycycline for genital chlamydial infection. Searching (...) Studies published in English were retrieved from the following databases: MEDLINE and Pre-MEDLINE (from 1975 to August 2001), HealthSTAR (from 1975 to August 2001), EBM Reviews: Best Evidence (from September 1991 to January/February 2001), EBM Reviews: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (second quarter of 2001), and EBM Reviews: DARE (second quarter of 2001). The medical subject headings 'CT' and 'doxycycline' or 'CT' and 'azithromycin' were used as search terms. Bibliographies of computer

2002 DARE.

14. Systematic review: Low-quality evidence that atovaquone-proguanil and doxycycline are better tolerated prophylactic antimalarial regimens in travellers than mefloquine

Systematic review: Low-quality evidence that atovaquone-proguanil and doxycycline are better tolerated prophylactic antimalarial regimens in travellers than mefloquine Low-quality evidence that atovaquone-proguanil and doxycycline are better tolerated prophylactic antimalarial regimens in travellers than mefloquine | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time (...) . To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Low-quality evidence that atovaquone-proguanil and doxycycline are better

2010 Evidence-Based Nursing

15. Artemether-lumefantrine and liver enzyme abnormalities in non-severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria in returned travellers: a retrospective comparative study with quinine-doxycycline in a Portuguese centre. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Artemether-lumefantrine and liver enzyme abnormalities in non-severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria in returned travellers: a retrospective comparative study with quinine-doxycycline in a Portuguese centre. Artemisinin-based therapy is the current standard treatment for non-severe malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum. The potential for asymptomatic liver toxicity of this therapy and its implication in clinical practice is currently unknown. The aim of this study is to assess the hepatic function (...) in patients treated with a standard three-day artemisinin-based regimen and to compare it with the quinine-doxycycline regimen.Retrospective and comparative study of returned adult travellers admitted with non-severe P. falciparum malaria. Fifty-seven patients were included: 19 treated with artemisinin-based therapy and 38 with quinine-doxycycline therapy.During treatment, when compared with quinine-doxycycline group, the artemisinin-lumefantrine group presented a higher proportion of significant liver

2017 Malaria journal

16. Doxycycline for prevention of erlotinib-induced rash in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after failure of first-line chemotherapy: A randomized, open-label trial. (Abstract)

Doxycycline for prevention of erlotinib-induced rash in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after failure of first-line chemotherapy: A randomized, open-label trial. Rash is a common epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-induced toxicity that can impair quality of life and treatment compliance.We sought to evaluate the efficacy of doxycycline in preventing erlotinib-induced rash (folliculitis) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.This open-label, randomized, prospective (...) , phase II trial was conducted in 147 patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer progressing after first-line chemotherapy, randomized for 4 months with erlotinib alone 150 mg/d per os (control arm) or combined with doxycycline 100 mg/d (doxycycline arm). Incidence and severity of rash, compliance, survival, and safety were assessed.Baseline characteristics of the 147 patients were well balanced in the intent-to-treat population. Folliculitis occurred in 71% of patients

2016 Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

17. One Dose of Doxycycline for the Prevention of Lyme Disease: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

One Dose of Doxycycline for the Prevention of Lyme Disease: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines One Dose of Doxycycline for the Prevention of Lyme Disease: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need One Dose of Doxycycline for the Prevention of Lyme Disease: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines One Dose of Doxycycline for the Prevention of Lyme Disease: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Last updated: May (...) 21, 2019 Project Number: RC1121-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of one dose of doxycycline for the prevention of Lyme disease in patients with tick attachment? Are the evidence-based guidelines associated with the use of one dose of doxycycline for the prevention of Lyme disease in patients with tick attachment? Key Message Based primarily on a very-low quality randomized controlled

2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

18. Topical doxycycline foam 4% for prophylactic management of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor skin toxicity: an exploratory phase 2, randomized, double-blind clinical study. (Abstract)

Topical doxycycline foam 4% for prophylactic management of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor skin toxicity: an exploratory phase 2, randomized, double-blind clinical study. Acneiform rash, a common toxicity of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRIs), can cause patient discomfort, warranting changes in treatment. This study investigated the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of a novel doxycycline foam, FDX104 4%, for managing EGFRI-related skin toxicity.This

2019 Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Controlled trial quality: uncertain

19. Azithromycin versus Doxycycline for Urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis Infection. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Azithromycin versus Doxycycline for Urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis Infection. Urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infection remains prevalent and causes substantial reproductive morbidity. Recent studies have raised concern about the efficacy of azithromycin for the treatment of chlamydia infection.We conducted a randomized trial comparing oral azithromycin with doxycycline for the treatment of urogenital chlamydia infection among adolescents in youth correctional facilities, to evaluate (...) the noninferiority of azithromycin (1 g in one dose) to doxycycline (100 mg twice daily for 7 days). The treatment was directly observed. The primary end point was treatment failure at 28 days after treatment initiation, with treatment failure determined on the basis of nucleic acid amplification testing, sexual history, and outer membrane protein A (OmpA) genotyping of C. trachomatis strains.Among the 567 participants enrolled, 284 were randomly assigned to receive azithromycin, and 283 were randomly assigned

2015 The New England journal of medicine Controlled trial quality: predicted high

20. Azithromycin Compared With Doxycycline for Treating Anorectal Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection Concomitant to a Vaginal Infection

Azithromycin Compared With Doxycycline for Treating Anorectal Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection Concomitant to a Vaginal Infection Azithromycin Compared With Doxycycline for Treating Anorectal Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection Concomitant to a Vaginal Infection - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have (...) reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Azithromycin Compared With Doxycycline for Treating Anorectal Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection Concomitant to a Vaginal Infection (CHLAZIDOXY) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before

2018 Clinical Trials