Latest & greatest articles for diazepam

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Top results for diazepam

21. Comparison of intranasal midazolam with intravenous diazepam for treating febrile seizures in children: prospective randomised study

Comparison of intranasal midazolam with intravenous diazepam for treating febrile seizures in children: prospective randomised study PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club2000

22. Comparison of intranasal midazolam with intravenous diazepam for treating febrile seizures in children: prospective randomised study.

Comparison of intranasal midazolam with intravenous diazepam for treating febrile seizures in children: prospective randomised study. 10884257 2000 08 11 2000 08 11 2014 07 28 0959-8138 321 7253 2000 Jul 08 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Comparison of intranasal midazolam with intravenous diazepam for treating febrile seizures in children: prospective randomised study. 83-6 To compare the safety and efficacy of midazolam given intranasally with diazepam given intravenously in the treatment (...) of children with prolonged febrile seizures. Prospective randomised study. Paediatric emergency department in a general hospital. 47 children aged six months to five years with prolonged febrile seizure (at least 10 minutes) during a 12 month period. Intranasal midazolam (0.2 mg/kg) and intravenous diazepam (0.3 mg/kg). Time from arrival at hospital to starting treatment and cessation of seizures. Intranasal midazolam and intravenous diazepam were equally effective. Overall, 23 of 26 seizures were

BMJ2000 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

23. Magnesium sulphate versus diazepam for eclampsia.

Magnesium sulphate versus diazepam for eclampsia. BACKGROUND: A number of different anticonvulsants are used to control eclamptic fits and to prevent future seizures. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of magnesium sulphate compared with diazepam when used for the care of women with eclampsia. Magnesium sulphate is compared with phenytoin and with lytic cocktail (in preparation) in other Cochrane reviews. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy (...) and Childbirth trials register and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, 1999 Issue 3. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials comparing magnesium sulphate (intravenous or intramuscular administration) with diazepam for women with a clinical diagnosis of eclampsia. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Trial quality was assessed and data extraction was done by the two reviewers. MAIN RESULTS: Five trials involving 1236 women were included. Most of these trials were of good quality. Magnesium sulphate was associated

Cochrane2000

24. Buccal midazolam and rectal diazepam for treatment of prolonged seizures in childhood and adolescence: a randomised trial.

Buccal midazolam and rectal diazepam for treatment of prolonged seizures in childhood and adolescence: a randomised trial. 10030327 1999 03 11 1999 03 11 2015 06 16 0140-6736 353 9153 1999 Feb 20 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Buccal midazolam and rectal diazepam for treatment of prolonged seizures in childhood and adolescence: a randomised trial. 623-6 Convulsive status epilepticus is the most common neurological medical emergency and has high morbidity and mortality. Early treatment before (...) admission to hospital is best with an effective medication that can be administered safely. We aimed to find out whether there are differences in efficacy and adverse events between buccal administration of liquid midazolam and rectal administration of liquid diazepam in the acute treatment of seizures. At a residential school with on-site medical facilities 42 young people with severe epilepsy were enrolled. Continuous seizures of more than 5 min duration were randomly treated with buccal midazolam

Lancet1999

25. A randomized, prospective, double-blind comparison of midazolam (Versed) and emulsified diazepam (Dizac) for opioid-based, conscious sedation in endoscopic procedures

A randomized, prospective, double-blind comparison of midazolam (Versed) and emulsified diazepam (Dizac) for opioid-based, conscious sedation in endoscopic procedures A randomized, prospective, double-blind comparison of midazolam (Versed) and emulsified diazepam (Dizac) for opioid-based, conscious sedation in endoscopic procedures A randomized, prospective, double-blind comparison of midazolam (Versed) and emulsified diazepam (Dizac) for opioid-based, conscious sedation in endoscopic (...) procedures Van Houten J S, Crane S A, Janardan S K Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Using emulsified diazepam (e-diazepam) for conscious sedation in upper and lower endoscopic procedures. Type of intervention Treatment

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.1998

26. A comparison of rectal diazepam gel and placebo for acute repetitive seizures.

A comparison of rectal diazepam gel and placebo for acute repetitive seizures. 9637805 1998 06 25 1998 06 25 2013 11 21 0028-4793 338 26 1998 Jun 25 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. A comparison of rectal diazepam gel and placebo for acute repetitive seizures. 1869-75 Acute repetitive seizures are readily recognizable episodes involving increased seizure frequency. Urgent treatment is often required. Rectal diazepam gel is a promising therapy. We conducted a randomized (...) , double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study of home-based treatment for acute repetitive seizures. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either rectal diazepam gel, at a dosage varying from 0.2 to 0.5 mg per kilogram of body weight on the basis of age, or placebo. Children received one dose at the onset of acute repetitive seizures and a second dose four hours later. Adults received three doses -- one dose at onset, and two more doses 4 and 12 hours after onset. Treatment

NEJM1998

27. A controlled trial of diazepam administered during febrile illnesses to prevent recurrence of febrile seizures.

A controlled trial of diazepam administered during febrile illnesses to prevent recurrence of febrile seizures. 8510706 1993 07 15 1993 07 15 2013 11 21 0028-4793 329 2 1993 Jul 08 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. A controlled trial of diazepam administered during febrile illnesses to prevent recurrence of febrile seizures. 79-84 Phenobarbital, once widely prescribed to prevent febrile seizures, is now in disfavor because of its side effects and lack of efficacy. Diazepam (...) , administered only during episodes of fever, may be a safe, effective agent to prevent the recurrence of febrile seizures. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among 406 children (mean age, 24 months) who had at least one febrile seizure. Diazepam (0.33 mg per kilogram of body weight) or placebo was administered orally every eight hours during all febrile illnesses. During a mean follow-up of 1.9 years (a period during which 90 percent of febrile seizures recur), our intention

NEJM1993

28. Reducing long-term diazepam prescribing in office practice. A controlled trial of educational visits.

Reducing long-term diazepam prescribing in office practice. A controlled trial of educational visits. 2877101 1986 11 28 1986 11 28 2016 10 17 0098-7484 256 18 1986 Nov 14 JAMA JAMA Reducing long-term diazepam prescribing in office practice. A controlled trial of educational visits. 2536-9 We conducted a controlled, statewide trial of the efficacy of an educational visit by a physician counselor in the reduction of diazepam prescribing in outpatient practice. A novel aspect of this trial (...) was the provision of a schedule for gradual withdrawal of long-term diazepam users from drug therapy; 51% of visited doctors attempted to withdraw patients from diazepam therapy and 26% utilized the withdrawal schedule. The entire group of 43 visited doctors reduced the rate of long-term diazepam users in their practice by 18% relative to the control group; the subgroup of doctors who utilized the withdrawal schedule had and even greater reduction of 33%. These results suggest that practicing doctors

JAMA1986

29. Clinical importance of the interaction of diazepam and cimetidine.

Clinical importance of the interaction of diazepam and cimetidine. 6427609 1984 07 10 1984 07 10 2015 11 19 0028-4793 310 25 1984 Jun 21 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Clinical importance of the interaction of diazepam and cimetidine. 1639-43 Cimetidine is known to impair the hepatic microsomal oxidation of diazepam, reducing its clearance and prolonging its half-life. We studied the clinical importance of this effect in 10 patients, who were receiving long-term treatment (...) with diazepam for anxiety, tension, or difficulty in sleeping, in an eight-week double-blind controlled study during which the diazepam dosage remained constant. The study was in four two-week phases: base-line or adaptation, coadministration of cimetidine (300 mg) or matching placebo four times daily, crossover to the opposite treatment (placebo or cimetidine), and recovery treatment with diazepam alone. During the cimetidine phase, plasma concentrations of diazepam plus desmethyldiazepam rose an average

NEJM1984

30. Gradual withdrawal of diazepam after long-term therapy.

Gradual withdrawal of diazepam after long-term therapy. 6134180 1983 07 29 1983 07 29 2015 06 16 0140-6736 1 8339 1983 Jun 25 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Gradual withdrawal of diazepam after long-term therapy. 1402-6 41 outpatients who were long-term consumers of diazepam in therapeutic dosage were gradually withdrawn from the drug over 3 months by stepwise reduction. In a double-blind procedure half the patients began withdrawal immediately and half after 8 weeks. Of 36 patients who (...) the most important, patients with passive-dependent traits having a significantly greater prevalence of withdrawal reactions. Tyrer P P Owen R R Dawling S S eng Clinical Trial Journal Article Randomized Controlled Trial Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't England Lancet 2985213R 0140-6736 Q3JTX2Q7TU Diazepam AIM IM Adult Aged Clinical Trials as Topic Diazepam administration & dosage adverse effects Double-Blind Method Female Humans Male Middle Aged Personality Substance Withdrawal Syndrome diagnosis

Lancet1983

31. Double-blind study of lorazepam and diazepam in status epilepticus.

Double-blind study of lorazepam and diazepam in status epilepticus. 6131148 1983 04 07 1983 04 07 2016 10 17 0098-7484 249 11 1983 Mar 18 JAMA JAMA Double-blind study of lorazepam and diazepam in status epilepticus. 1452-4 Lorazepam was compared with diazepam for the treatment of status epilepticus in a double-blind, randomized trial. Seventy-eight patients with 81 episodes were enrolled. Patients received one or two doses of either 4 mg of lorazepam or 10 mg of diazepam intravenously. Seizures (...) were controlled in 89% of the episodes treated with lorazepam and in 76% treated with diazepam. The times for onset of action of the medications did not differ significantly. Adverse effects occurred in 13% of the lorazepam-treated patients and in 12% of the diazepam-treated patients. Respiratory depression and arrest, the most frequent adverse effects, were treated symptomatically; no adverse sequelae were noted. Leppik I E IE Derivan A T AT Homan R W RW Walker J J Ramsay R E RE Patrick B B eng

JAMA1983

32. Long-term diazepam therapy and clinical outcome.

Long-term diazepam therapy and clinical outcome. 6348314 1983 09 09 1983 09 09 2016 10 17 0098-7484 250 6 1983 Aug 12 JAMA JAMA Long-term diazepam therapy and clinical outcome. 767-71 This double-blind study involved the continuous (six to 22 weeks) treatment of 180 chronically anxious outpatients with diazepam, 15 to 40 mg/day. Our findings indicate that a significant number of patients benefit from prolonged diazepam treatment and that tolerance to the anxiolytic effect of diazepam does (...) incapacitating and did not include convulsions or psychotic reactions. In all cases, withdrawal reactions could be readily managed by gradually tapering the dose of the benzodiazepine. Rickels K K Case W G WG Downing R W RW Winokur A A eng MH-08957 MH NIMH NIH HHS United States Clinical Trial Journal Article Randomized Controlled Trial Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S. United States JAMA 7501160 0098-7484 Q3JTX2Q7TU Diazepam AIM IM Adult Anxiety Disorders drug therapy Chronic Disease Clinical Trials

JAMA1983