Latest & greatest articles for diazepam

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on diazepam or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on diazepam and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for diazepam

21. Magnesium sulphate versus diazepam for eclampsia. (Abstract)

Magnesium sulphate versus diazepam for eclampsia. Eclampsia, the occurrence of a convulsion in association with pre-eclampsia, remains a rare but serious complication of pregnancy. A number of different anticonvulsants are used to control eclamptic fits and to prevent further fits.The objective of this review was to assess the effects of magnesium sulphate compared with diazepam when used for the care of women with eclampsia. Magnesium sulphate is compared with phenytoin and with lytic cocktail (...) in other Cochrane reviews.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth trials register (28 November 2002) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2002).Randomised trials comparing magnesium sulphate (intravenous or intramuscular administration) with diazepam for women with a clinical diagnosis of eclampsia.Both reviewers assessed and extracted data.Seven trials involving 1441 women are included. Most of the data are from trials of good quality

2003 Cochrane

22. Intermittent diazepam and continuous phenobarbital to treat recurrence of febrile seizures: a systematic review with meta-analysis

Intermittent diazepam and continuous phenobarbital to treat recurrence of febrile seizures: a systematic review with meta-analysis Intermittent diazepam and continuous phenobarbital to treat recurrence of febrile seizures: a systematic review with meta-analysis Intermittent diazepam and continuous phenobarbital to treat recurrence of febrile seizures: a systematic review with meta-analysis Masuko A H, Castro A A, Santos G R, Atallah A N, do Prado L B, de Carvalho L B, do Prado G F CRD summary (...) This review examined the effectiveness of phenobarbital and diazepam for the prophylaxis of febrile seizures in children. The authors stated that no conclusions could be drawn regarding the effectiveness of the two drugs, owing to the differing nature of the primary studies. Overall, the authors' conclusions are in line with the evidence reviewed and appear warranted. Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of phenobarbital and diazepam versus placebo for the prophylaxis of febrile seizures

2003 DARE.

23. Intermittent diazepam and continuous phenobarbital to treat recurrence of febrile seizures: a systematic review with meta-analysis. (Full text)

Intermittent diazepam and continuous phenobarbital to treat recurrence of febrile seizures: a systematic review with meta-analysis. Convulsions triggered by fever are the most common type of seizures in childhood, and 20% to 30% of them have recurrence. The prophylactic treatment is still controversial, so we performed a systematic review to find out the effectiveness of continuous phenobarbital and intermittent diazepam compared to placebo for febrile seizure recurrence.Only randomized, double (...) -blind, placebo-controlled trials were analyzed. The recurrence of febrile seizure was assessed for each drug.Ten eligible clinical trials were included. Febrile seizure recurrence was smaller in children treated with diazepam or phenobarbital than in placebo group. Prophylaxis with either phenobarbital or diazepam reduces recurrences of febrile seizures. The studies were clinical, methodological, and statistically heterogeneous.The effectiveness of phenobarbital and diazepam could

2003 Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria PubMed abstract

24. Efficacy of diazepam as an anti-anxiety agent: meta-analysis of double-blind, randomized controlled trials carried out in Japan. (Abstract)

Efficacy of diazepam as an anti-anxiety agent: meta-analysis of double-blind, randomized controlled trials carried out in Japan. Diazepam is one of the most widely used, broad-spectrum anti-anxiety agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of diazepam, and to establish whether it is more effective than a placebo in improving the various neurotic anxiety states seen in patients with neurosis or psychosomatic disease. Of the recently established comprehensive register (...) of psychotropic drug trials carried out in Japan, a total of 17 double-blind, randomized controlled trials were identified on the treatment of neurosis using anti-anxiety compounds, in which both diazepam and placebos were used. Meta-analysis of these 17 studies demonstrated that diazepam is significantly more effective than a placebo (relative risk 1.35, 95% confidence interval 1.21-1.51, number needed to treat 9). The maximal effective dose of diazepam seems to be 12 or 18 mg/day with a treatment duration

2003 Human psychopharmacology

25. A comparison of lorazepam and diazepam as initial therapy in convulsive status epilepticus

A comparison of lorazepam and diazepam as initial therapy in convulsive status epilepticus A comparison of lorazepam and diazepam as initial therapy in convulsive status epilepticus A comparison of lorazepam and diazepam as initial therapy in convulsive status epilepticus Cock H R, Schapira A H Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions (...) followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Lorazepam was compared with diazepam as first-line treatment for convulsive status epilepticus (CSE). The dose of lorazepam was 4 mg intravenously (i.v.), repeated up to 2 times. The dose of diazepam was 10 mg i.v., repeated up to 3 times. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population The study population comprised patients aged over

2002 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

26. A comparison of lorazepam, diazepam, and placebo for the treatment of out-of-hospital status epilepticus. (Abstract)

A comparison of lorazepam, diazepam, and placebo for the treatment of out-of-hospital status epilepticus. It is uncertain whether the administration of benzodiazepines by paramedics is an effective and safe treatment for out-of-hospital status epilepticus.We conducted a randomized, double-blind trial to evaluate intravenous benzodiazepines administered by paramedics for the treatment of out-of-hospital status epilepticus. Adults with prolonged (lasting five minutes or more) or repetitive (...) generalized convulsive seizures received intravenous diazepam (5 mg), lorazepam (2 mg), or placebo. An identical second injection was given if needed.Of the 205 patients enrolled, 66 received lorazepam, 68 received diazepam, and 71 received placebo. Status epilepticus had been terminated on arrival at the emergency department in more patients treated with lorazepam (59.1 percent) or diazepam (42.6 percent) than patients given placebo (21.1 percent) (P=0.001). After adjustment for covariates, the odds

2001 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

27. Magnesium sulphate versus diazepam for eclampsia. (Abstract)

Magnesium sulphate versus diazepam for eclampsia. A number of different anticonvulsants are used to control eclamptic fits and to prevent future seizures.The objective of this review was to assess the effects of magnesium sulphate compared with diazepam when used for the care of women with eclampsia. Magnesium sulphate is compared with phenytoin and with lytic cocktail (in preparation) in other Cochrane reviews.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth trials register and the Cochrane (...) Controlled Trials Register, 1999 Issue 3.Randomised trials comparing magnesium sulphate (intravenous or intramuscular administration) with diazepam for women with a clinical diagnosis of eclampsia.Trial quality was assessed and data extraction was done by the two reviewers.Five trials involving 1236 women were included. Most of these trials were of good quality. Magnesium sulphate was associated with a substantial reduction in the recurrence of convulsions, when compared to diazepam (relative risk 0.45

2000 Cochrane

28. Comparison of intranasal midazolam with intravenous diazepam for treating febrile seizures in children: prospective randomised study. (Full text)

Comparison of intranasal midazolam with intravenous diazepam for treating febrile seizures in children: prospective randomised study. To compare the safety and efficacy of midazolam given intranasally with diazepam given intravenously in the treatment of children with prolonged febrile seizures.Prospective randomised study.Paediatric emergency department in a general hospital.47 children aged six months to five years with prolonged febrile seizure (at least 10 minutes) during a 12 month (...) period.Intranasal midazolam (0.2 mg/kg) and intravenous diazepam (0.3 mg/kg).Time from arrival at hospital to starting treatment and cessation of seizures.Intranasal midazolam and intravenous diazepam were equally effective. Overall, 23 of 26 seizures were controlled with midazolam and 24 out of 26 with diazepam. The mean time from arrival at hospital to starting treatment was significantly shorter in the midazolam group (3.5 (SD 1.8) minutes, 95% confidence interval 3.3 to 3.7) than the diazepam group (5.5

2000 BMJ Controlled trial quality: uncertain PubMed abstract

29. Comparison of intranasal midazolam with intravenous diazepam for treating febrile seizures in children: prospective randomised study

Comparison of intranasal midazolam with intravenous diazepam for treating febrile seizures in children: prospective randomised study PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2000 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

30. Buccal midazolam and rectal diazepam for treatment of prolonged seizures in childhood and adolescence: a randomised trial. (Abstract)

Buccal midazolam and rectal diazepam for treatment of prolonged seizures in childhood and adolescence: a randomised trial. Convulsive status epilepticus is the most common neurological medical emergency and has high morbidity and mortality. Early treatment before admission to hospital is best with an effective medication that can be administered safely. We aimed to find out whether there are differences in efficacy and adverse events between buccal administration of liquid midazolam and rectal (...) administration of liquid diazepam in the acute treatment of seizures.At a residential school with on-site medical facilities 42 young people with severe epilepsy were enrolled. Continuous seizures of more than 5 min duration were randomly treated with buccal midazolam or rectal diazepam. If the seizure did not stop within 10 min additional medication chosen by the attending physician was administered. We monitored oxygen saturation and blood pressure for 30 min after treatment. The main outcome measures were

1999 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

31. Tizanidine treatment of spasticity: a meta-analysis of controlled, double-blind, comparative studies with baclofen and diazepam. (Abstract)

Tizanidine treatment of spasticity: a meta-analysis of controlled, double-blind, comparative studies with baclofen and diazepam. To conduct a meta-analysis of the antispastic efficacy and tolerability of tizanidine, we reviewed records of the European sponsor of tizanidine trials and selected double-blind, randomized studies of moderate duration in which oral tizanidine was compared with baclofen or diazepam. Studies were required to have individual patient data; three key outcome measures (...) (Ashworth Rating Scale for muscle tone, a measure of muscle strength, and Global Tolerability to Treatment Rating); and patients with multiple sclerosis or cerebrovascular lesions. Ten trials involving 270 patients met these criteria. Seven studies used baclofen as the positive control; three used diazepam. As measured by Total and Lower Body Ashworth scores, tizanidine and similar spasticity-reducing effects to both baclofen and diazepam. Muscle strength was affected less by tizanidine than by either

1998 Advances in therapy

32. A comparison of rectal diazepam gel and placebo for acute repetitive seizures. (Full text)

A comparison of rectal diazepam gel and placebo for acute repetitive seizures. Acute repetitive seizures are readily recognizable episodes involving increased seizure frequency. Urgent treatment is often required. Rectal diazepam gel is a promising therapy.We conducted a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study of home-based treatment for acute repetitive seizures. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either rectal diazepam gel, at a dosage varying from 0.2 (...) assigned to diazepam and 61 to placebo) with a history of acute repetitive seizures, 91 (47 children and 44 adults) were treated for an exacerbation of seizures during the study period. Diazepam treatment was superior to placebo with regard to the outcome variables related to efficacy: reduced seizure frequency (P<0.001) and improved global assessment of treatment outcome by the care giver (frequency and severity of seizures and drug toxicity) (P<0.001). Post hoc analysis showed diazepam to be superior

1998 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain PubMed abstract

33. A randomized, prospective, double-blind comparison of midazolam (Versed) and emulsified diazepam (Dizac) for opioid-based, conscious sedation in endoscopic procedures

A randomized, prospective, double-blind comparison of midazolam (Versed) and emulsified diazepam (Dizac) for opioid-based, conscious sedation in endoscopic procedures Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

1998 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

34. Comparison of sedative recovery time after midazolam versus diazepam administration. (Abstract)

Comparison of sedative recovery time after midazolam versus diazepam administration. To compare the sedative recovery rate pharmacology of intravenous midazolam vs. diazepam when used for short-term sedation.English-language articles were identified through a search of the MEDLINE and InPharma databases. Bibliographies of retrieved articles were examined for relevant articles.Twenty-eight studies were identified based on a priori inclusion criteria. Eight trials had enough information (...) to combine results for sedative recovery rate.The difference in mean time to sedative recovery, weighted by sample size, was determined.Of the 28 trials, eight reported a significantly faster sedation recovery rate from diazepam vs. midazolam, whereas 19 trials reported no difference in sedative recovery time, and a single trial reported that midazolam offered significantly faster recovery from sedation than diazepam. A commonly defined time to sedative recovery event was available for only eight trials

1994 Critical care medicine

35. A controlled trial of diazepam administered during febrile illnesses to prevent recurrence of febrile seizures. (Abstract)

A controlled trial of diazepam administered during febrile illnesses to prevent recurrence of febrile seizures. Phenobarbital, once widely prescribed to prevent febrile seizures, is now in disfavor because of its side effects and lack of efficacy. Diazepam, administered only during episodes of fever, may be a safe, effective agent to prevent the recurrence of febrile seizures.We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among 406 children (mean age, 24 months) who had (...) at least one febrile seizure. Diazepam (0.33 mg per kilogram of body weight) or placebo was administered orally every eight hours during all febrile illnesses.During a mean follow-up of 1.9 years (a period during which 90 percent of febrile seizures recur), our intention-to-treat analysis showed a reduction of 44 percent in the risk of febrile seizures per person-year with diazepam (relative risk = 0.56; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.38 to 0.81; P = 0.002). A survival analysis of the length of time

1993 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

36. Reducing long-term diazepam prescribing in office practice. A controlled trial of educational visits. (Abstract)

Reducing long-term diazepam prescribing in office practice. A controlled trial of educational visits. We conducted a controlled, statewide trial of the efficacy of an educational visit by a physician counselor in the reduction of diazepam prescribing in outpatient practice. A novel aspect of this trial was the provision of a schedule for gradual withdrawal of long-term diazepam users from drug therapy; 51% of visited doctors attempted to withdraw patients from diazepam therapy and 26% utilized (...) the withdrawal schedule. The entire group of 43 visited doctors reduced the rate of long-term diazepam users in their practice by 18% relative to the control group; the subgroup of doctors who utilized the withdrawal schedule had and even greater reduction of 33%. These results suggest that practicing doctors are concerned with long-term use of diazepam and that the educational visit by another physician is one method for reducing such use.

1986 JAMA

37. Clinical importance of the interaction of diazepam and cimetidine. (Abstract)

Clinical importance of the interaction of diazepam and cimetidine. Cimetidine is known to impair the hepatic microsomal oxidation of diazepam, reducing its clearance and prolonging its half-life. We studied the clinical importance of this effect in 10 patients, who were receiving long-term treatment with diazepam for anxiety, tension, or difficulty in sleeping, in an eight-week double-blind controlled study during which the diazepam dosage remained constant. The study was in four two-week (...) phases: base-line or adaptation, coadministration of cimetidine (300 mg) or matching placebo four times daily, crossover to the opposite treatment (placebo or cimetidine), and recovery treatment with diazepam alone. During the cimetidine phase, plasma concentrations of diazepam plus desmethyldiazepam rose an average of 57 per cent (P less than 0.005), then fell when cimetidine was withdrawn. However, there were no significant changes in scores on the digit-symbol-substitution test, a tracking task

1984 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

38. Gradual withdrawal of diazepam after long-term therapy. (Abstract)

Gradual withdrawal of diazepam after long-term therapy. 41 outpatients who were long-term consumers of diazepam in therapeutic dosage were gradually withdrawn from the drug over 3 months by stepwise reduction. In a double-blind procedure half the patients began withdrawal immediately and half after 8 weeks. Of 36 patients who completed treatment, 16 (44.4%) experienced true withdrawal phenomena on reducing their drugs, but 8 other patients had pseudo-withdrawal reactions at a time when

1983 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

39. Double-blind study of lorazepam and diazepam in status epilepticus. (Abstract)

Double-blind study of lorazepam and diazepam in status epilepticus. Lorazepam was compared with diazepam for the treatment of status epilepticus in a double-blind, randomized trial. Seventy-eight patients with 81 episodes were enrolled. Patients received one or two doses of either 4 mg of lorazepam or 10 mg of diazepam intravenously. Seizures were controlled in 89% of the episodes treated with lorazepam and in 76% treated with diazepam. The times for onset of action of the medications did (...) not differ significantly. Adverse effects occurred in 13% of the lorazepam-treated patients and in 12% of the diazepam-treated patients. Respiratory depression and arrest, the most frequent adverse effects, were treated symptomatically; no adverse sequelae were noted.

1983 JAMA Controlled trial quality: uncertain

40. Long-term diazepam therapy and clinical outcome. (Abstract)

Long-term diazepam therapy and clinical outcome. This double-blind study involved the continuous (six to 22 weeks) treatment of 180 chronically anxious outpatients with diazepam, 15 to 40 mg/day. Our findings indicate that a significant number of patients benefit from prolonged diazepam treatment and that tolerance to the anxiolytic effect of diazepam does not develop during a 22-week study period. The duration of continual treatment with sedative-benzodiazepines was clearly the most important

1983 JAMA Controlled trial quality: uncertain