Latest & greatest articles for diazepam

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on diazepam or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on diazepam and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for diazepam

1. Diazepam

Diazepam Top results for diazepam - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4 (...) ) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for diazepam The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

2. Acute Liver Failure due to Trazodone and Diazepam (Full text)

Acute Liver Failure due to Trazodone and Diazepam Most antidepressant agents have the potential to cause liver injury, even at therapeutic doses. Nevertheless, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) from antidepressant agents is a rare event. There is no way to prevent idiopathic DILI, but the severity of the reaction may be minimized with prompt recognition and early withdrawal of the agent. We describe a rare case of a 63-year-old man presenting with acute liver failure after 3 months of trazodone (...) and diazepam administration at normal therapeutic doses, requiring liver transplantation. This report should increase physicians' awareness of this complication and call attention to the regular monitoring of liver tests in patients taking trazodone, in order to prevent life-threatening complications.

2016 GE Portuguese journal of gastroenterology PubMed abstract

3. Is intravenous lorazepam really more effective and safe than intravenous diazepam as first-line treatment for convulsive status epilepticus? A systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. (Abstract)

Is intravenous lorazepam really more effective and safe than intravenous diazepam as first-line treatment for convulsive status epilepticus? A systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Some guidelines or expert consensus indicate that intravenous (IV) lorazepam (LZP) is preferable to IV diazepam (DZP) for initial treatment of convulsive status epilepticus (SE). We aimed to critically assess all the available data on efficacy and tolerability of IV LZP compared

2016 Epilepsy & behavior : E&B

4. Lorazepam or diazepam for convulsive status epilepticus: A meta-analysis. (Abstract)

Lorazepam or diazepam for convulsive status epilepticus: A meta-analysis. Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) is a neurological emergency in adults and children. However, whether a particular benzodiazepine is of superior efficacy and safety in management of CSE is controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to compare the outcome of lorazepam and diazepam for treating CSE. We searched the PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Google Scholar databases from (...) differences and risk ratios for continuous and dichotomous variables, respectively. A total of six studies involving 970 patients were included in this analysis. The majority of patients were children (n=574) and 396 patients were adults. Meta-analysis showed no significant difference between the two treatment groups regarding seizure control and adverse effects regardless of patient age. This meta-analysis demonstrates that diazepam and lorazepam have equal efficacy and side effects for treating CSE

2016 Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia

5. A Comparison of Midazolam, Lorazepam, and Diazepam for the Treatment of Status Epilepticus in Children: A Network Meta-analysis. (Abstract)

A Comparison of Midazolam, Lorazepam, and Diazepam for the Treatment of Status Epilepticus in Children: A Network Meta-analysis. Midazolam, lorazepam, and diazepam were recommended as emergent initial therapy for status epilepticus. However, there are no current studies to confirm the best agent for pediatric status epilepticus. We compared the efficacy of midazolam, lorazepam, and diazepam in treating pediatric status epilepticus using a network meta-analysis method. In total, 16 randomized (...) controlled trials containing 1821 patients were included. Nonintravenous midazolam, intravenous lorazepam, and intravenous diazepam were more successful in achieving seizure cessation when compared with nonintravenous diazepam (odds ratio = 2.23, 95% credibility interval: 1.62, 3.10; odds ratio = 2.71, 95% credibility interval: 1.25, 5.89; odds ratio = 2.65, 95% credibility interval: 1.12, 6.29; respectively). Among lorazepam, midazolam, and diazepam, midazolam had the highest probability (surface under

2016 Journal of child neurology

6. Nonintravenous midazolam versus intravenous or rectal diazepam for the treatment of early status epilepticus: A systematic review with meta-analysis. (Abstract)

Nonintravenous midazolam versus intravenous or rectal diazepam for the treatment of early status epilepticus: A systematic review with meta-analysis. Prompt treatment of status epilepticus (SE) is associated with better outcomes. Rectal diazepam (DZP) and nonintravenous (non-IV) midazolam (MDZ) are often used in the treatment of early SE instead of intravenous applications. The aim of this review was to determine if nonintravenous MDZ is as effective and safe as intravenous or rectal DZP

2015 Epilepsy & behavior : E&B

7. Lorazepam vs diazepam for pediatric status epilepticus: a randomized clinical trial. (Full text)

Lorazepam vs diazepam for pediatric status epilepticus: a randomized clinical trial. Benzodiazepines are considered first-line therapy for pediatric status epilepticus. Some studies suggest that lorazepam may be more effective or safer than diazepam, but lorazepam is not Food and Drug Administration approved for this indication.To test the hypothesis that lorazepam has better efficacy and safety than diazepam for treating pediatric status epilepticus.This double-blind, randomized clinical trial (...) was conducted from March 1, 2008, to March 14, 2012. Patients aged 3 months to younger than 18 years with convulsive status epilepticus presenting to 1 of 11 US academic pediatric emergency departments were eligible. There were 273 patients; 140 randomized to diazepam and 133 to lorazepam.Patients received either 0.2 mg/kg of diazepam or 0.1 mg/kg of lorazepam intravenously, with half this dose repeated at 5 minutes if necessary. If status epilepticus continued at 12 minutes, fosphenytoin

2014 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high PubMed abstract

8. Diazepam

Diazepam USE OF DIAZEPAM IN PREGNANCY 0344 892 0909 USE OF DIAZEPAM IN PREGNANCY (Date of issue: January 2012 , Version: 1 ) This is a UKTIS monograph for use by health care professionals. For case-specific advice please contact UKTIS on 0344 892 0909. To report an exposure please download and complete a . Please encourage all women to complete an . Summary Diazepam is a long-acting benzodiazepine used as a hypnotic, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant and muscle relaxant. Its actions are mediated (...) by enhancement of the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Data on the risk of congenital malformation following use of diazepam in pregnancy are highly confounded by the research techniques employed in the majority of the available studies. Evidence is therefore conflicting; with some older studies suggesting possible increased risks of congenital malformation, including orofacial clefts and cardiac malformations. More recent, better designed studies

2014 UK Teratology Information Service

9. For Child Patients With Anxiety In The Dental Office, The Use Of Nitrous Oxide Augments The Sedative Effects Of Orally Administered Diazepam

For Child Patients With Anxiety In The Dental Office, The Use Of Nitrous Oxide Augments The Sedative Effects Of Orally Administered Diazepam UTCAT2422, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title For Child Patients With Anxiety In The Dental Office, The Use Of Nitrous Oxide Augments The Sedative Effects Of Orally Administered Diazepam Clinical Question In a child patient undergoing dental treatment, will sedation (...) with nitrous oxide and diazepam, as compared to treatment with diazepam alone, reduce patient anxiety and improve the overall quality of the sedation? Clinical Bottom Line For child patients with anxiety in the dental office, the use of nitrous oxide augments the sedative effects of orally administered diazepam. The evaluation of the overall sedative effects of the diazepam and nitrous oxide together were better than the sedative effects of diazepam alone. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking

2013 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

10. Intranasal midazolam vs rectal diazepam for the home treatment of acute seizures in pediatric patients with epilepsy (Full text)

Intranasal midazolam vs rectal diazepam for the home treatment of acute seizures in pediatric patients with epilepsy To compare intranasal midazolam, using a Mucosal Atomization Device (IN-MMAD), with rectal diazepam (RD) for the home treatment of seizures in children with epilepsy.Prospective randomized study.Patients' homes and a freestanding children's hospital that serves as a referral center for 5 states.A total of 358 pediatric patients who visited a pediatric neurology clinic from July

2010 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high PubMed abstract

11. Magnesium sulphate versus diazepam for eclampsia. (Full text)

Magnesium sulphate versus diazepam for eclampsia. Eclampsia, the occurrence of a seizure in association with pre-eclampsia, remains a rare but serious complication of pregnancy. A number of different anticonvulsants are used to control eclamptic fits and to prevent further fits.The objective of this review was to assess the effects of magnesium sulphate compared with diazepam when used for the care of women with eclampsia. Magnesium sulphate is compared with phenytoin and with lytic cocktail (...) in other Cochrane reviews.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 September 2010) and CENTRAL (2010, Issue 3).Randomised trials comparing magnesium sulphate (intravenous or intramuscular administration) with diazepam for women with a clinical diagnosis of eclampsia.Two authors assessed and extracted data independently.We have included seven trials, involving 1396 women. Three trials (1030 women) were good quality. Magnesium sulphate was associated with a reduction

2010 Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) PubMed abstract

12. Midazolam versus diazepam for the treatment of status epilepticus in children and young adults: a meta-analysis. (Full text)

Midazolam versus diazepam for the treatment of status epilepticus in children and young adults: a meta-analysis. Rapid treatment of status epilepticus (SE) is associated with better outcomes. Diazepam and midazolam are commonly used, but the optimal agent and administration route is unclear.The objective was to determine by systematic review if nonintravenous (non-IV) midazolam is as effective as diazepam, by any route, in terminating SE seizures in children and adults. Time to seizure (...) controlled trials comparing midazolam and diazepam as first-line treatment for SE, and meeting the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT)-based quality measures, were eligible. Two reviewers independently screened studies for inclusion and extracted outcomes data. Administration routes were stratified as non-IV (buccal, intranasal, intramuscular, rectal) or IV. Fixed-effects models generated pooled statistics.Six studies with 774 subjects were included. For seizure cessation, midazolam

2010 Academic Emergency Medicine PubMed abstract

13. Comparison of buccal midazolam with rectal diazepam in the treatment of prolonged seizures in Ugandan children: a randomized clinical trial. (Abstract)

Comparison of buccal midazolam with rectal diazepam in the treatment of prolonged seizures in Ugandan children: a randomized clinical trial. Our goal was to compare the efficacy and safety of buccal midazolam with rectal diazepam in the treatment of prolonged seizures in Ugandan children.This was a single-blind, randomized clinical trial in which 330 patients were randomly assigned to receive buccal midazolam or rectal diazepam. The trial was conducted in the pediatric emergency unit (...) of the national referral hospital of Uganda. Consecutive patients who were aged 3 months to 12 years and presented while convulsing or who experienced a seizure that lasted >5 minutes were randomly assigned to receive buccal midazolam plus rectal placebo or rectal diazepam plus buccal placebo. The primary outcome of this study was cessation of visible seizure activity within 10 minutes without recurrence in the subsequent hour.Treatment failures occurred in 71 (43.0%) of 165 patients who received rectal

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

14. Lorazepam or diazepam in paediatric status epilepticus

Lorazepam or diazepam in paediatric status epilepticus BestBets: Lorazepam or diazepam in paediatric status elipticus Lorazepam or diazepam in paediatric status elipticus Report By: Vince Choudhery - Specialist Registrar Search checked by Will Townend - Specialist Registrar Emergency Medicine Institution: North Western Emergency Medicine Specialist Registrar NW Rotation Current web editor: Richard Body - Clinical Research Fellow Date Submitted: 1st March 2000 Date Completed: 24th May 2006 Last (...) Modified: 21st April 2006 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [children in status epilepticus] is [lorazepam better than diazepam] at [safely terminating the seizure]? Clinical Scenario A 2 year old is brought to the emergency department with a first presentation of fitting secondary to febrile illness. She has been fitting for >30 minutes. You obtain intravenous access and wonder if lorazepam or diazepam would be best at terminating the fit safely. Search Strategy Medline 1966-9/99 using

2006 BestBETS

15. Diazepam (as Diazemuls and Stesolid)

Diazepam (as Diazemuls and Stesolid) Diazepam (as Diazemuls and Stesolid) - updated guidance DZP Drugs May 2010 Page 1 of 2 PRESENTATION Ampoule containing 10 milligrams diazepam in an oil-in-water emulsion making up 2ml of milky white ?uid (Diazemuls). Rectal tube containing 2.5 milligrams, 5 milligrams or 10 milligrams diazepam (Stesolid). INDICATIONS Fits longer than 5 minutes and STILL FITTING. Repeated ?ts – not secondary to an uncorrected hypoxia or hypoglycaemic episode. Status (...) and safely obtained, which is particularly likely in the case of children. In small children Stesolid should be considered the ?rst choice treatment and IV access sought subsequently. The earlier the drug is given the more likely the patient is to respond, which is why the rectal route is preferred in children, while the IV route is sought. Diazepam should only be used if the patient has been ?tting for >5 minutes (and is still ?tting), or if ?ts recur in rapid succession without time for full recovery

2006 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

16. Safety and efficacy of buccal midazolam versus rectal diazepam for emergency treatment of seizures in children: a randomised controlled trial. (Abstract)

Safety and efficacy of buccal midazolam versus rectal diazepam for emergency treatment of seizures in children: a randomised controlled trial. Rectal diazepam and buccal midazolam are used for emergency treatment of acute febrile and afebrile (epileptic) seizures in children. We aimed to compare the safety and efficacy of these drugs.A multicentre, randomised controlled trial was undertaken to compare buccal midazolam with rectal diazepam for emergency-room treatment of children aged 6 months (...) ) for buccal midazolam and 27% (30 of 110) for rectal diazepam (percentage difference 29%, 95% CI 16-41). Analysing only initial episodes revealed a similar result. The rate of respiratory depression did not differ between groups. When centre, age, known diagnosis of epilepsy, use of antiepileptic drugs, prior treatment, and length of seizure before treatment were adjusted for with logistic regression, buccal midazolam was more effective than rectal diazepam.Buccal midazolam was more effective than rectal

2005 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

17. Intranasal midazolam or rectal diazepam in patients with fits

Intranasal midazolam or rectal diazepam in patients with fits BestBets: Intranasal midazolam or rectal diazepam in patients with fits Intranasal midazolam or rectal diazepam in patients with fits Report By: Martin Smith - Consultant in Emergency Medicine Search checked by Simon Carley - Consultant in Emergency Medicine Institution: Manchester STEM Current web editor: Russell Boyd - Consultant in Emergency Medicine Date Submitted: 1st March 2000 Date Completed: 31st May 2005 Last Modified: 19th (...) May 2005 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [a fitting patient with no intravenous access] can [intranasal midazolam or rectal diazepam] stop [the fit]? Clinical Scenario A 14 year old known epileptic attends the Emergency department having had a fit at school. His teacher is with him. She tells you that he was fitting for approximately twenty minutes. She also tells you that they have rectal diazepam at school but the staff were reluctant to administer it. You check the patient

2005 BestBETS

18. Buccal midazolam as an alternative to rectal diazepam for prolonged seizures in childhood and adolescence

Buccal midazolam as an alternative to rectal diazepam for prolonged seizures in childhood and adolescence BestBets: Buccal midazolam as an alternative to rectal diazepam for prolonged seizures in childhood and adolescence Buccal midazolam as an alternative to rectal diazepam for prolonged seizures in childhood and adolescence Report By: Richard Body - SHO, A&E Rotation Search checked by Mawra Ijaz - Staff Grade, Paediatrics Institution: Stepping Hill Hospital Date Submitted: 27th January 2004 (...) Date Completed: 18th May 2005 Last Modified: 18th May 2005 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [children with prolonged seizures] does [buccal midazolam or rectal diazepam] lead to [quicker resolution of seizures]? Clinical Scenario An 11 year-old girl, known to be epileptic, is brought to the Emergency Department with a prolonged seizure. You have no intravenous access at this point. A colleague recently mentioned that buccal midazolam is an available alternative to rectal diazepam

2005 BestBETS

19. Cost-effectiveness of venlafaxine XL compared with diazepam in the treatment of generalised anxiety disorder in the United Kingdom

Cost-effectiveness of venlafaxine XL compared with diazepam in the treatment of generalised anxiety disorder in the United Kingdom Cost-effectiveness of venlafaxine XL compared with diazepam in the treatment of generalised anxiety disorder in the United Kingdom Cost-effectiveness of venlafaxine XL compared with diazepam in the treatment of generalised anxiety disorder in the United Kingdom Guest J F, Russ J, Lenox-Smith A Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation (...) that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The study compared the effectiveness and costs of venlafaxine XL (Efexor XL) and diazepam for the treatment of generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) among non-depressed patients. Patients received either 75 mg venlafaxine XL once daily or 5 mg diazepam 3

2005 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

20. Diazepam for treating tetanus. (Abstract)

Diazepam for treating tetanus. Clinical management of the muscle spasms and rigidity of tetanus poses a difficult therapeutic problem to physicians everywhere, especially in resource poor countries. There are wide variations in therapeutic regimens commonly used in clinical practice due to uncertainties about effectiveness of conventional drugs. Diazepam compared to other drugs (eg phenobarbitone and chlorpromazine) may have advantages because of combined anticonvulsant, muscle relaxant (...) , sedative and anxiolytic effects.To compare diazepam to other drugs in treating the muscle spasms and rigidity of tetanus in children and adults.We searched the Cochrane Neonatal Group trials register (October 2003), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 2003), MEDLINE (1966 to October 2003), EMBASE (1980 to October 2003), LILACS (2003), CINAHL (October 2003), Science Citation Index, African Index Medicus, conference abstracts and reference lists of articles. We

2004 Cochrane