Latest & greatest articles for depression

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Top results for depression

81. Guidelines for Adolescent Depression in Primary Care (GLAD-PC): Part I. Practice Preparation, Identification, Assessment, and Initial Management

Guidelines for Adolescent Depression in Primary Care (GLAD-PC): Part I. Practice Preparation, Identification, Assessment, and Initial Management 29483200 2018 02 27 1098-4275 2018 Feb 26 Pediatrics Pediatrics Guidelines for Adolescent Depression in Primary Care (GLAD-PC): Part I. Practice Preparation, Identification, Assessment, and Initial Management. e20174081 10.1542/peds.2017-4081 To update clinical practice guidelines to assist primary care (PC) clinicians in the management of adolescent (...) depression. This part of the updated guidelines is used to address practice preparation, identification, assessment, and initial management of adolescent depression in PC settings. By using a combination of evidence- and consensus-based methodologies, guidelines were developed by an expert steering committee in 2 phases as informed by (1) current scientific evidence (published and unpublished) and (2) draft revision and iteration among the steering committee, which included experts, clinicians, and youth

EvidenceUpdates2018

82. Effectiveness of theta burst versus high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with depression (THREE-D): a randomised non-inferiority trial.

Effectiveness of theta burst versus high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with depression (THREE-D): a randomised non-inferiority trial. BACKGROUND: Treatment-resistant major depressive disorder is common; repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) by use of high-frequency (10 Hz) left-side dorsolateral prefrontal cortex stimulation is an evidence-based treatment for this disorder. Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) is a newer form of rTMS (...) that can be delivered in 3 min, versus 37·5 min for a standard 10 Hz treatment session. We aimed to establish the clinical effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of iTBS compared with standard 10 Hz rTMS in adults with treatment-resistant depression. METHODS: In this randomised, multicentre, non-inferiority clinical trial, we recruited patients who were referred to specialty neurostimulation centres based at three Canadian university hospitals (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and Toronto

Lancet2018

83. Antidepressants for the treatment of people with co-occurring depression and alcohol dependence.

Antidepressants for the treatment of people with co-occurring depression and alcohol dependence. BACKGROUND: Alcohol dependence is a major public health problem characterized by recidivism, and medical and psychosocial complications. The co-occurrence of major depression in people entering treatment for alcohol dependence is common, and represents a risk factor for morbidity and mortality, which negatively influences treatment outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and risks (...) of antidepressants for the treatment of people with co-occurring depression and alcohol dependence. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group Specialised Register (via CRSLive), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and Embase from inception to July 2017. We also searched for ongoing and unpublished studies via ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP

Cochrane2018

84. Antidepressants for the treatment of depression in people with cancer.

Antidepressants for the treatment of depression in people with cancer. BACKGROUND: Major depression and other depressive conditions are common in people with cancer. These conditions are not easily detectable in clinical practice, due to the overlap between medical and psychiatric symptoms, as described by diagnostic manuals such as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and International Classification of Diseases (ICD). Moreover, it is particularly challenging (...) to distinguish between pathological and normal reactions to such a severe illness. Depressive symptoms, even in subthreshold manifestations, have been shown to have a negative impact in terms of quality of life, compliance with anti-cancer treatment, suicide risk and likely even the mortality rate for the cancer itself. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy, tolerability and acceptability of antidepressants in this population are few and often report conflicting results. OBJECTIVES: To assess

Cochrane2018

85. Antidepressants for preventing postnatal depression.

Antidepressants for preventing postnatal depression. BACKGROUND: Depression is common in the postnatal period and can lead to adverse effects on the infant and wider family, in addition to the morbidity for the mother. It is not clear whether antidepressants are effective for the prevention of postnatal depression and little is known about possible adverse effects for the mother and infant, particularly during breastfeeding. This is an update of a Cochrane Review last published in 2005 (...) . OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of antidepressant medication for the prevention of postnatal depression, in comparison with any other treatment, placebo or standard care. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Common Mental Disorders Controlled Trials Register (CCMDCTR ‒ both Studies and References), CENTRAL (Wiley), MEDLINE (OVID), Embase (OVID), PsycINFO (OVID), on 13 February 2018. We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) trials portal (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov on 13

Cochrane2018

86. Response: Effects of physical activity on depressive symptoms during breast cancer survivorship: a meta-analysis of randomised control trials

Response: Effects of physical activity on depressive symptoms during breast cancer survivorship: a meta-analysis of randomised control trials 29683152 2018 11 14 2059-7029 3 3 2018 ESMO open ESMO Open Response: Effects of physical activity on depressive symptoms during breast cancer survivorship: a meta-analysis of randomised control trials . e000333 10.1136/esmoopen-2018-000333 Patsou Efrossini D ED Department of Psychology, Panteion Panepistimio Koinonikon Kai Politikon Epistimon, Athena

ESMO open2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

87. A primary care intervention helps older people with depression

A primary care intervention helps older people with depression NIHR DC | Signal - A primary care intervention helps older people with depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover A primary care intervention helps older people with depression Published on 23 January 2018 Enhanced case management (also called collaborative care) added to primary care reduced symptoms in people with clinical depression, compared with usual primary care. The benefit was similar to other (...) depression treatments. However, the small benefit over usual care was not sustained to 12 months. This NIHR-funded UK trial was carried out among nearly 500 adults aged at least 65 years. Primary care mental health practitioners delivered six sessions to encourage activity and social contact (five were by telephone). Medication monitoring and other psychological advice, linking up with other NHS staff, was also offered to those in the collaborative care group. This relatively cheap intervention might

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

88. Simpler, cheaper therapy (behavioural activation) can be as good as CBT for treating depression

Simpler, cheaper therapy (behavioural activation) can be as good as CBT for treating depression NIHR DC | Signal - Simpler, cheaper therapy (behavioural activation) can be as good as CBT for treating depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Simpler, cheaper therapy (behavioural activation) can be as good as CBT for treating depression Published on 5 October 2016 A simpler therapy called behavioural activation can be as effective at treating adults (...) with depression as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Also, it is delivered more cheaply, by trained junior mental health workers. CBT is commonly provided to adults with depression and it is recommended by NICE as first- line treatment. However, it is complex to deliver and therapists are highly skilled and expensive. Behavioural activation is a simpler type of talking therapy that encourages people to develop more positive behaviour such as planning activities and doing constructive things that they would

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

89. Three psychological therapies are effective for adolescent depression

Three psychological therapies are effective for adolescent depression NIHR DC | Signal - Three psychological therapies are effective for adolescent depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Three psychological therapies are effective for adolescent depression Published on 4 July 2017 For adolescents with unipolar major depression, there was no difference in self-reported depressive symptoms or cost-effectiveness after 18 months for cognitive (...) major depression 18 months after treatment started, indicating current interventions are not as effective as they could be at sustaining reductions in depression. The cost of treatment did not differ significantly between the three so thinking about which is the more practical option and preferred by the adolescent should be the main consideration. This may help improve attendance and adherence to treatment. Why was this study needed? Depression occurs in 1 to 3% of children and young people

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

90. Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating depression regardless of physical health status

Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating depression regardless of physical health status NIHR DC | Signal - Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating depression regardless of physical health status Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating depression regardless of physical health status Published on 21 February 2017 Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating (...) depression compared to usual care, whether or not people also have a long-term condition such as cancer or heart disease. Collaboration was provided by a case manager in primary care who was not a mental health professional. They coordinated a treatment plan with input from a GP and mental health professional. It is currently only recommended for people with depression and a long-term physical condition as prior to this review there was only consistent evidence of its effectiveness for people with both

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

91. Aerobic exercise moderately reduces depressive symptoms in new mothers

Aerobic exercise moderately reduces depressive symptoms in new mothers NIHR DC | Signal - Aerobic exercise moderately reduces depressive symptoms in new mothers Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Aerobic exercise moderately reduces depressive symptoms in new mothers Published on 21 November 2017 For women who have had a baby in the past year, doing aerobic exercise can reduce the level of depressive symptoms they experience. This NIHR funded review of 13 studies showed (...) that involving new mothers in group exercise programmes, or advising them on an exercise of their choice, reduced depressive symptoms compared with usual care. The effect was moderate but significant. Examples of exercise were pram walks, with dietary advice from peers in some studies. The benefits were shown whether or not the mothers had postnatal depression. This evidence does have some limitations regarding its quality but is the best research currently available. This review should give additional

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

92. Overseas models of specialist support for primary care physicians in managing depression may not be transferrable to the UK health system

Overseas models of specialist support for primary care physicians in managing depression may not be transferrable to the UK health system NIHR DC | Signal - Overseas models of specialist support for primary care physicians in managing depression may not be transferrable to the UK health system Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Overseas models of specialist support for primary care physicians in managing depression may not be transferrable to the UK health system (...) . The specialist may or may not have direct contact with the patient. Half of the trials were from the USA, where specialist care is normal for illness of all severity, and only one from the UK. Relevance to the NHS is likely to be limited. Most studies were in people with depression with limited evidence available for other mental health conditions. Evidence was strongest for an effect on adherence to treatment, with few studies examining effects on patient mental health outcomes. The review did not examine

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

93. Talking therapies may prevent relapse of depression

Talking therapies may prevent relapse of depression NIHR DC | Signal - Talking therapies may prevent relapse of depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Talking therapies may prevent relapse of depression Published on 30 September 2015 This review looked at how effective different psychological "talking" therapies were at preventing relapse of depression. It found that cognitive behavioural therapy, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and interpersonal (...) psychotherapy all reduced the risk of depression relapse over a year by 20 to 25% compared with a control treatment. There was further evidence that the effect for cognitive behavioural therapy was sustained up to two years. This reinforces NICE guidance, which recommends that cognitive behavioural therapy or mindfulness-based cognitive therapy be offered to people at risk of a relapse of depression. The trial results suggested factors like participant characteristics and treatment delivery affected

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

94. Online cognitive behavioural therapy is no more effective than usual GP care for people with depression

Online cognitive behavioural therapy is no more effective than usual GP care for people with depression NIHR DC | Signal - Online cognitive behavioural therapy is no more effective than usual GP care for people with depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Online cognitive behavioural therapy is no more effective than usual GP care for people with depression Published on 9 February 2016 Computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in addition to usual GP (...) care was no more effective than usual GP care alone at four months or at 24 months. It was also not a popular treatment for patients with mild to moderate depression who typically only used the programme once or twice. Indeed, more than four out of five patients did not complete the course. Depression affects large numbers of people in the UK. Other research shows that CBT is effective in treating depression, but it is expensive to provide and people sometimes have to wait for treatment due

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

95. Mindfulness therapy may provide an alternative to continuing antidepressants in preventing recurrence of depression

Mindfulness therapy may provide an alternative to continuing antidepressants in preventing recurrence of depression NIHR DC | Signal - Mindfulness therapy may provide an alternative to continuing antidepressants in preventing recurrence of depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Mindfulness therapy may provide an alternative to continuing antidepressants in preventing recurrence of depression Published on 25 April 2015 This NIHR-funded RCT found no evidence (...) that mindfulness-based cognitive therapy was better than continuing antidepressant drugs in reducing depression relapse or recurrence for people at the highest risk of depression. There was also no significant difference in cost. When interpreted alongside the broader evidence for mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and the need for patient choice, the findings suggest an alternative for those patients wishing to consider an alternative to maintenance anti-depressants, and reinforce NICE guidance. However

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

96. Antidepressants and talking therapies offer similar benefits for new-onset major depression

Antidepressants and talking therapies offer similar benefits for new-onset major depression NIHR DC | Signal - Antidepressants and talking therapies offer similar benefits for new-onset major depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Antidepressants and talking therapies offer similar benefits for new-onset major depression Published on 23 March 2016 This review found no difference in effectiveness or drop-out rates between antidepressants and cognitive (...) behavioural therapy for adults recently diagnosed with major depressive disorder. Both treatments should be offered, as recommended by NICE, either alone or possibly in combination, and the final decision will rely heavily on the patient’s preference. The challenge for talking therapies in the NHS has long been a lack of capacity. However, the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme has in the last few years provided thousands of trained therapists who can be accessed through GPs and in some cases directly

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

97. Two simple questions help GPs rule out depression

Two simple questions help GPs rule out depression NIHR DC | Signal - Two simple questions help GPs rule out depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Two simple questions help GPs rule out depression Published on 23 March 2016 The Whooley questions are useful for ruling out depression in that few people who answer no to both questions are depressed according to a ‘gold standard’ diagnostic interview. A positive screen is indicated by the person answering “yes (...) ” to one or both of the Whooley questions and for these people the diagnostic interview will still be necessary to diagnose the condition. The two simple questions are; 1) have you felt down or depressed or hopeless? and 2) have you been bothered by little interest or pleasure in doing things? - in the past month. The questions are already recommended by NICE to identify people who may be at higher risk of depression, prior to further assessment. These people include those with long-term conditions

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

98. One type of drug for depression during pregnancy may be linked to a small increase in pre-term births

One type of drug for depression during pregnancy may be linked to a small increase in pre-term births NIHR DC | Signal - One type of drug for depression during pregnancy may be linked to a small increase in pre-term births Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal One type of drug for depression during pregnancy may be linked to a small increase in pre-term births Published on 9 August 2016 Women who are depressed during pregnancy and who take selective serotonin (...) inhibitors (SSRIs) may be more likely to have a pre-term birth than those who do not take SSRIs. Pre-term birth occurred in 6.8% of women with depression during pregnancy treated with SSRIs compared to 5.8% of depressed women who were treated with talking therapies alone. However, because this is a review of observational (cohort) studies rather than randomised controlled trials it is not possible to say that SSRIs cause pre-term birth. For example, it is possible that women who had worse depression were

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

99. A coping programme moderately reduces depression and anxiety in carers of people with dementia

A coping programme moderately reduces depression and anxiety in carers of people with dementia NIHR DC | Signal - A coping programme moderately reduces depression and anxiety in carers of people with dementia Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal A coping programme moderately reduces depression and anxiety in carers of people with dementia Published on 28 October 2015 This NIHR-funded trial found that a programme to support carers of people with dementia (...) was moderately effective in reducing carers’ depression and anxiety scores for up to two years. It was also cost-effective. The programme consisted of eight sessions delivered by psychology graduates, covering topics such as managing difficult behaviour, accessing support and planning for the future. One in three people over 65 develop dementia and family are often the primary caregivers. The findings of this trial support NICE recommendations that the psychological burden upon carers is assessed

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

100. Collaborative mental health care in the NHS has small but meaningful benefits for people with depression

Collaborative mental health care in the NHS has small but meaningful benefits for people with depression NIHR DC | Signal - Collaborative mental health care in the NHS has small but meaningful benefits for people with depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Collaborative mental health care in the NHS has small but meaningful benefits for people with depression Published on 31 May 2016 Collaborative care, that places a care manager in primary care to deliver (...) treatment and coordinate care between GPs and specialists, improved recovery of people with moderate to severe depression. Primary responsibility for prescribing remained with the GP. This large trial found that improvements were modest, but were similar to those found in an evaluation of the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme. The collaborative care model was cost-effective too. Collaborative care cost on average £272.50 per participant and had a cost per quality-adjusted life year

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018