Latest & greatest articles for depression

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Top results for depression

1. Aerobic exercise is an effective treatment for depression

Aerobic exercise is an effective treatment for depression Aerobic exercise is an effective treatment for depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Aerobic exercise is an effective treatment for depression Published on 22 January 2019 doi: A systematic review shows aerobic exercise improves clinically diagnosed major depression compared with antidepressants or treatment as usual. Previous reviews found conflicting evidence of benefit. The new review only included (...) the trials thought to have the most applicable results. This meant that trials recruiting people who might not have a clinical diagnosis of depression or through media adverts were not considered. Also, studies were only included if they featured aerobic exercise – walking, jogging or using cardiovascular gym equipment rather than other activities such as stretching. Exercise is already recommended as a low-intensity psychological intervention in national guidance. Though the review only included 11

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

2. Antidepressants and talking therapies offer similar benefits for new-onset major depression

Antidepressants and talking therapies offer similar benefits for new-onset major depression Signal - Antidepressants and talking therapies offer similar benefits for new-onset major depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Antidepressants and talking therapies offer similar benefits for new-onset major depression Published on 23 March 2016 This review found no difference in effectiveness or drop-out rates between antidepressants and cognitive (...) behavioural therapy for adults recently diagnosed with major depressive disorder. Both treatments should be offered, as recommended by NICE, either alone or possibly in combination, and the final decision will rely heavily on the patient’s preference. The challenge for talking therapies in the NHS has long been a lack of capacity. However, the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme has in the last few years provided thousands of trained therapists who can be accessed through GPs and in some cases directly

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

3. Two simple questions help GPs rule out depression

Two simple questions help GPs rule out depression Signal - Two simple questions help GPs rule out depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Two simple questions help GPs rule out depression Published on 23 March 2016 The Whooley questions are useful for ruling out depression in that few people who answer no to both questions are depressed according to a ‘gold standard’ diagnostic interview. A positive screen is indicated by the person answering “yes” to one or both (...) of the Whooley questions and for these people the diagnostic interview will still be necessary to diagnose the condition. The two simple questions are; 1) have you felt down or depressed or hopeless? and 2) have you been bothered by little interest or pleasure in doing things? - in the past month. The questions are already recommended by NICE to identify people who may be at higher risk of depression, prior to further assessment. These people include those with long-term conditions and women before or after

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

4. Collaborative mental health care in the NHS has small but meaningful benefits for people with depression

Collaborative mental health care in the NHS has small but meaningful benefits for people with depression Signal - Collaborative mental health care in the NHS has small but meaningful benefits for people with depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Collaborative mental health care in the NHS has small but meaningful benefits for people with depression Published on 31 May 2016 Collaborative care, that places a care manager in primary care to deliver treatment (...) and coordinate care between GPs and specialists, improved recovery of people with moderate to severe depression. Primary responsibility for prescribing remained with the GP. This large trial found that improvements were modest, but were similar to those found in an evaluation of the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme. The collaborative care model was cost-effective too. Collaborative care cost on average £272.50 per participant and had a cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

5. Depression and anxiety common in people with heart disease

Depression and anxiety common in people with heart disease Signal - Depression and anxiety common in people with heart disease Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Depression and anxiety common in people with heart disease Published on 28 June 2016 This multi-part NIHR study found that depression and anxiety were more common in people with coronary heart disease, than the general population. Anxiety increased people’s risk of a future heart attack. The people included (...) in the study were generally older, white males, so the findings may not apply to everyone. Patients considered a nurse-led intervention to personalise care was acceptable. The intervention included optimising medicines and facilitating referrals for psychological support. When asked, people with depression and coronary heart disease generally favoured non-medical treatments. These findings provide an insight into the scale of depression and anxiety amongst people with coronary heart disease. Overall costs

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

6. One type of drug for depression during pregnancy may be linked to a small increase in pre-term births

One type of drug for depression during pregnancy may be linked to a small increase in pre-term births Signal - One type of drug for depression during pregnancy may be linked to a small increase in pre-term births Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover One type of drug for depression during pregnancy may be linked to a small increase in pre-term births Published on 9 August 2016 Women who are depressed during pregnancy and who take selective serotonin inhibitors (SSRIs) may be (...) more likely to have a pre-term birth than those who do not take SSRIs. Pre-term birth occurred in 6.8% of women with depression during pregnancy treated with SSRIs compared to 5.8% of depressed women who were treated with talking therapies alone. However, because this is a review of observational (cohort) studies rather than randomised controlled trials it is not possible to say that SSRIs cause pre-term birth. For example, it is possible that women who had worse depression were more likely

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

7. Aerobic exercise moderately reduces depressive symptoms in new mothers

Aerobic exercise moderately reduces depressive symptoms in new mothers Signal - Aerobic exercise moderately reduces depressive symptoms in new mothers Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Aerobic exercise moderately reduces depressive symptoms in new mothers Published on 21 November 2017 For women who have had a baby in the past year, doing aerobic exercise can reduce the level of depressive symptoms they experience. This NIHR funded review of 13 studies showed that involving (...) new mothers in group exercise programmes, or advising them on an exercise of their choice, reduced depressive symptoms compared with usual care. The effect was moderate but significant. Examples of exercise were pram walks, with dietary advice from peers in some studies. The benefits were shown whether or not the mothers had postnatal depression. This evidence does have some limitations regarding its quality but is the best research currently available. This review should give additional

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

8. A primary care intervention helps older people with depression

A primary care intervention helps older people with depression Signal - A primary care intervention helps older people with depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover A primary care intervention helps older people with depression Published on 23 January 2018 Enhanced case management (also called collaborative care) added to primary care reduced symptoms in people with clinical depression, compared with usual primary care. The benefit was similar to other depression (...) rolled-out to older people not using the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme. It is possible that greater treatment duration of the number of sessions might lead to longer-term impacts. These results have contributed to the draft NICE depression guideline out for consultation in 2017. Those with physical health and mobility problems and other barriers to using services may especially benefit. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? About one in seven people over

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

9. Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating depression regardless of physical health status

Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating depression regardless of physical health status Signal - Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating depression regardless of physical health status Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating depression regardless of physical health status Published on 21 February 2017 Collaborative care can be moderately effective at treating depression compared (...) to usual care, whether or not people also have a long-term condition such as cancer or heart disease. Collaboration was provided by a case manager in primary care who was not a mental health professional. They coordinated a treatment plan with input from a GP and mental health professional. It is currently only recommended for people with depression and a long-term physical condition as prior to this review there was only consistent evidence of its effectiveness for people with both. This NIHR-funded

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

10. Three psychological therapies are effective for adolescent depression

Three psychological therapies are effective for adolescent depression Signal - Three psychological therapies are effective for adolescent depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Three psychological therapies are effective for adolescent depression Published on 4 July 2017 For adolescents with unipolar major depression, there was no difference in self-reported depressive symptoms or cost-effectiveness after 18 months for cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), short-term (...) psychoanalytic psychotherapy and brief psychological intervention. This was a large NIHR funded trial of three evidence-based psychological therapies often used in the NHS alongside medication or without it. Teenagers from various sites in the UK were randomly allocated to one of the three therapy types and some also given antidepressants if indicated. Uptake and attendance proved difficult, which may be an element for further research. Around a quarter had indication of unipolar major depression 18 months

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

11. Simpler, cheaper therapy (behavioural activation) can be as good as CBT for treating depression

Simpler, cheaper therapy (behavioural activation) can be as good as CBT for treating depression Behavioural activation therapy can be as good as CBT for treating depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Simpler, cheaper therapy (behavioural activation) can be as good as CBT for treating depression Published on 5 October 2016 doi: A simpler therapy called behavioural activation can be as effective at treating adults with depression as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT (...) ). Also, it is delivered more cheaply, by trained junior mental health workers. CBT is commonly provided to adults with depression and it is recommended by NICE as first- line treatment. However, it is complex to deliver and therapists are highly skilled and expensive. Behavioural activation is a simpler type of talking therapy that encourages people to develop more positive behaviour such as planning activities and doing constructive things that they would usually avoid doing. We did not know

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

12. Guided online interventions can help people recover from depression

Guided online interventions can help people recover from depression Guided online interventions can help people recover from depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Guided online interventions can help people recover from depression Published on 6 November 2018 doi: Internet-based interventions combined with remote professional support can improve outcomes for people with depression. Those receiving the intervention show better initial response to treatment and higher (...) recovery rates compared with control groups who are either waiting for treatment or receiving less support. This meta-analysis shows people using guided internet therapy are over twice as likely to respond to treatment and achieve remission. This finding reinforces current NICE guidance which recommends this type of approach for mild to moderate depression. This type of treatment has the potential to reach more people than face to face therapy and provides more support than wholly self-directed

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

13. Combining mirtazapine with other antidepressants is not effective for treatment-resistant depression

Combining mirtazapine with other antidepressants is not effective for treatment-resistant depression Combining mirtazapine with other antidepressants is not effective for treatment-resistant depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Combining mirtazapine with other antidepressants is not effective for treatment-resistant depression Published on 15 January 2019 doi: Adding mirtazapine to first-line antidepressants for adults with treatment-resistant depression does (...) not improve symptoms when compared with placebo (dummy pills). People taking mirtazapine are more likely to experience side effects, and stop taking their treatment. This NIHR-funded trial took place in 106 general practices in England, recruiting 480 adults with mild to severe depression. All participants had been taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) antidepressants for at least six weeks but were still depressed. The findings show

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

14. Antidepressants do not help treat depression in people living with dementia

Antidepressants do not help treat depression in people living with dementia Antidepressants do not help treat depression in dementia Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Antidepressants do not help treat depression in people living with dementia Published on 8 January 2019 doi: Antidepressants do not reduce symptoms of depression in people with dementia compared with placebo (dummy pills). Measured 6 to 13 weeks after starting the treatment, there is little or no difference (...) is reliable. This review supports the NICE guideline, which recommends that antidepressants are not routinely offered to people with dementia and depression, but that psychological treatments are considered instead. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? Dementia is a condition that includes memory loss, reasoning and communication difficulties, and changes in personality. It is progressive, so symptoms usually get worse. The most common types of dementia are Alzheimer’s disease

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

15. Radically open dialectical behaviour therapy for refractory depression: the RefraMED RCT

Radically open dialectical behaviour therapy for refractory depression: the RefraMED RCT Radically open dialectical behaviour therapy for refractory depression: the RefraMED RCT Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue (...) }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} Radically open dialectical behaviour therapy was not significantly better than usual care in reducing depression after 12 months, and had an incremental cost per QALY of about £220,000. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , , , , , , & . Thomas R Lynch 1, * , Roelie J Hempel 1 , Ben Whalley 2 , Sarah Byford 3 , Rampaul Chamba 4 , Paul Clarke 5 , Susan Clarke 6 , David Kingdon 7 , Heather O’Mahen 8 , Bob Remington 1 , Sophie C Rushbrook 6

NIHR HTA programme2019

16. Psychological therapies for anxiety and depression in children and adolescents with long-term physical conditions.

Psychological therapies for anxiety and depression in children and adolescents with long-term physical conditions. BACKGROUND: Long-term physical conditions affect 10% to 12% of children and adolescents worldwide. These individuals are at greater risk of developing psychological problems, particularly anxiety and depression, sometimes directly related to their illness or medical care (e.g. health-related anxiety). There is limited evidence regarding the effectiveness of psychological therapies (...) for treating anxiety and depression in this population. Therapies designed for children and adolescents without medical issues may or may not be appropriate for use with those who have long-term physical conditions. OBJECTIVES: This review was undertaken to assess the effectiveness and acceptability of psychological therapies in comparison with controls (treatment-as-usual, waiting list, attention placebo, psychological placebo, or non-psychological treatment) for treating anxiety and depression

Cochrane2018

17. Pharmacological interventions for the treatment of depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Pharmacological interventions for the treatment of depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. BACKGROUND: Studies report that up to 80% of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may struggle with symptoms of depression. However, this major comorbidity in COPD is rarely managed effectively. A number of recent studies indicate that left untreated, COPD-related depression is associated with worse quality of life, worse compliance with COPD treatment plan, increased (...) exacerbations, hospital admissions, and healthcare costs when compared to individuals with COPD without depression. Regrettably, COPD practice guidelines do not provide conclusive treatment recommendations for the use of antidepressants in patients with COPD, and base their guidelines on findings from trials in the general population. This may be problematic, as there is an elevated risk of respiratory issues associated with antidepressant treatment and COPD. Evaluating effectiveness and safety

Cochrane2018

18. Depression in children

Depression in children Depression in children - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Depression in children Last reviewed: October 2018 Last updated: November 2018 Summary Characterised by sad or irritable mood, anhedonia, decreased capacity to have fun, decreased self-esteem, sleep disturbance, social withdrawal or impaired social relationships, and impaired school performance. One of the most common (...) paediatric psychiatric disorders, especially among girls during adolescence. At-risk children should be screened for depression. It is crucial to make an accurate diagnosis, based on a comprehensive assessment and review of the history, with input from multiple sources. The safety of the child and others, and the duration and severity of depression, need to be evaluated carefully to help determine the appropriate level of care and treatment modality. Treatment is typically with active monitoring

BMJ Best Practice2018

19. Online cognitive behavioural therapy is no more effective than usual GP care for people with depression

Online cognitive behavioural therapy is no more effective than usual GP care for people with depression Signal - Online cognitive behavioural therapy is no more effective than usual GP care for people with depression Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Online cognitive behavioural therapy is no more effective than usual GP care for people with depression Published on 9 February 2016 Computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in addition to usual GP care was no more (...) effective than usual GP care alone at four months or at 24 months. It was also not a popular treatment for patients with mild to moderate depression who typically only used the programme once or twice. Indeed, more than four out of five patients did not complete the course. Depression affects large numbers of people in the UK. Other research shows that CBT is effective in treating depression, but it is expensive to provide and people sometimes have to wait for treatment due to limited numbers

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

20. Combining mirtazapine with SSRIs or SNRIs for treatment-resistant depression: the MIR RCT

Combining mirtazapine with SSRIs or SNRIs for treatment-resistant depression: the MIR RCT Combining mirtazapine with SSRIs or SNRIs for treatment-resistant depression: the MIR RCT Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata (...) .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} This study did not find convincing evidence of a clinically important benefit for mirtazapine in addition to a SSRI or SNRI antidepressant in primary care patients with treatment-resistant depression. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , , , , , , & . David Kessler 1, * , Alison Burns 1 , Debbie Tallon 1 , Glyn Lewis 2 , Stephanie MacNeill 3 , Jeff Round 4 , William Hollingworth 4 , Carolyn Chew-Graham 5 , Ian Anderson 6

NIHR HTA programme2018