Latest & greatest articles for dementia

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on dementia or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on dementia and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for dementia

21. Dementia

Dementia Top results for dementia - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast My query is: English Français Deutsch Čeština Español Magyar Svenska ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search (...) button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for dementia The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory

Trip Latest and Greatest2018

22. Alcohol consumption and risk of dementia: 23 year follow-up of Whitehall II cohort study.

Alcohol consumption and risk of dementia: 23 year follow-up of Whitehall II cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between alcohol consumption and risk of dementia. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Civil service departments in London (Whitehall II study). PARTICIPANTS: 9087 participants aged 35-55 years at study inception (1985/88). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incident dementia, identified through linkage to hospital, mental health services, and mortality registers until 2017 (...) . Measures of alcohol consumption were the mean from three assessments between 1985/88 and 1991/93 (midlife), categorised as abstinence, 1-14 units/week, and >14 units/week; 17 year trajectories of alcohol consumption based on five assessments of alcohol consumption between 1985/88 and 2002/04; CAGE questionnaire for alcohol dependence assessed in 1991/93; and hospital admission for alcohol related chronic diseases between 1991 and 2017. RESULTS: 397 cases of dementia were recorded over a mean follow

BMJ2018

23. Music-based therapeutic interventions for people with dementia.

Music-based therapeutic interventions for people with dementia. BACKGROUND: Dementia is a clinical syndrome with a number of different causes which is characterised by deterioration in cognitive, behavioural, social and emotional functions. Pharmacological interventions are available but have limited effect to treat many of the syndrome's features. Less research has been directed towards non-pharmacological treatments. In this review, we examined the evidence for effects of music-based (...) interventions. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of music-based therapeutic interventions for people with dementia on emotional well-being including quality of life, mood disturbance or negative affect, behavioural problems, social behaviour and cognition at the end of therapy and four or more weeks after the end of treatment. SEARCH METHODS: We searched ALOIS, the Specialized Register of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group (CDCIG) on 19 June 2017 using the terms: music therapy, music

Cochrane2018

24. Blood pressure-lowering treatment for preventing recurrent stroke, major vascular events, and dementia in patients with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack.

Blood pressure-lowering treatment for preventing recurrent stroke, major vascular events, and dementia in patients with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack. BACKGROUND: Stroke is an important cause of death and disability worldwide. Since high blood pressure is an important risk factor for stroke and stroke recurrence, drugs that lower blood pressure might play an important role in secondary stroke prevention. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether blood pressure-lowering drugs (BPLDs (...) ) started at least 48 hours after the index event are effective for the prevention of recurrent stroke, major vascular events, and dementia in people with stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Secondary objectives were to identify subgroups of people in which BPLDs are effective, and to investigate the optimum systolic blood pressure target after stroke or TIA for preventing recurrent stroke, major vascular events, and dementia. SEARCH METHODS: In August 2017, we searched the Trials Registers

Cochrane2018

25. Environmental and behavioural modifications for improving food and fluid intake in people with dementia.

Environmental and behavioural modifications for improving food and fluid intake in people with dementia. BACKGROUND: Weight loss, malnutrition and dehydration are common problems for people with dementia. Environmental modifications such as, change of routine, context or ambience at mealtimes, or behavioural modifications, such as education or training of people with dementia or caregivers, may be considered to try to improve food and fluid intake and nutritional status of people with dementia (...) . OBJECTIVES: Primary: To assess the effects of environmental or behavioural modifications on food and fluid intake and nutritional status in people with dementia. Secondary: To assess the effects of environmental or behavioural modifications in connection with nutrition on mealtime behaviour, cognitive and functional outcomes and quality of life, in specific settings (i.e. home care, residential care and nursing home care) for different stages of dementia. To assess the adverse consequences or effects

Cochrane2018

26. The Person, Interactions and Environment Programme to improve care of people with dementia in hospital: a multisite study

The Person, Interactions and Environment Programme to improve care of people with dementia in hospital: a multisite study The Person, Interactions and Environment Programme to improve care of people with dementia in hospital: a multisite study Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above (...) and public involvement representative, Alzheimer’s Society Research Network, , 6 Association for Dementia Studies, Institute of Health and Society, University of Worcester, Worcester, UK 7 England Centre for Practice Development, Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, UK 8 School of Health and Community Studies, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, UK * Corresponding author Email: {{metadata.Journal}} Volume: {{metadata.Volume}}, Issue: {{metadata.Issue}}, Published

NIHR HTA programme2018

29. Dementia

Dementia Autosynthesis - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast My query is: English Français Deutsch Čeština Español Magyar Svenska ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button

Trip Evidence Maps2018

30. Do statins prevent dementia?

Do statins prevent dementia? Do statins prevent dementia? – Morsels of Evidence \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t Like this: Like Loading... ","author":{"@type":"Person","name":"Michael Tam"},"image":["https:\/\/evidencebasedmedicine.com.au\/wp-content\/uploads\/2018\/06\/mo-june2018-pp54-55.png"]} Toggle search form Toggle navigation Evidence-based medicine for general practitioners Jun 25 2018 Do statins prevent dementia? By in , , , , Journal reference: McGuinness B, Craig D, Bullock R (...) , Passmore P. Statins for the prevention of dementia. Cochrane database of systematic reviews 2016 Jan 4(1):CD003160 Link: Published: January 2016 Evidence cookie says… Statins should not be used as a prophylaxis against dementia, as the only indication the limited evidence from high quality randomised trials suggests no effect there is some ambiguity as observational data has tended to suggest a protective effect The article was published in the June 2018 issue of Medical Observer , under the title

Morsels of Evidence2018

31. Do statins prevent dementia?

Do statins prevent dementia? Do statins prevent dementia? – Morsels of Evidence \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t Like this: Like Loading... ","author":{"@type":"Person","name":"Michael Tam"},"image":["http:\/\/evidencebasedmedicine.com.au\/wp-content\/uploads\/2018\/06\/mo-june2018-pp54-55.png"]} Toggle search form Toggle navigation Evidence-based medicine for general practitioners Jun 25 2018 Do statins prevent dementia? By in , , , , Journal reference: McGuinness B, Craig D, Bullock R (...) , Passmore P. Statins for the prevention of dementia. Cochrane database of systematic reviews 2016 Jan 4(1):CD003160 Link: Published: January 2016 Evidence cookie says… Statins should not be used as a prophylaxis against dementia, as the only indication the limited evidence from high quality randomised trials suggests no effect there is some ambiguity as observational data has tended to suggest a protective effect The article was published in the June 2018 issue of Medical Observer , under the title

Morsels of Evidence2018

32. Donepezil for dementia due to Alzheimer's disease.

Donepezil for dementia due to Alzheimer's disease. BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in older people. One approach to symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease is to enhance cholinergic neurotransmission in the brain by blocking the action of the enzyme responsible for the breakdown of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. This can be done by a group of drugs known as cholinesterase inhibitors. Donepezil is a cholinesterase inhibitor.This review is an updated (...) version of a review first published in 1998. OBJECTIVES: To assess the clinical efficacy and safety of donepezil in people with mild, moderate or severe dementia due to Alzheimer's disease; to compare the efficacy and safety of different doses of donepezil; and to assess the effect of donepezil on healthcare resource use and costs. SEARCH METHODS: We searched Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement's Specialized Register, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and a number of other sources on 20 May 2017

Cochrane2018

33. Aerobic and strength training exercise programme for cognitive impairment in people with mild to moderate dementia: the DAPA RCT

Aerobic and strength training exercise programme for cognitive impairment in people with mild to moderate dementia: the DAPA RCT Aerobic and strength training exercise programme for cognitive impairment in people with mild to moderate dementia: the DAPA RCT Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website (...) search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} A structured exercise programme, while well tolerated and enjoyed, did not produce any clinically meaningful benefit in cognitive function for people with dementia, and a slight worsening was observed. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , & . Sarah E Lamb 1, 2, 3, * , Dipesh Mistry 2 , Sharisse Alleyne 2 , Nicky Atherton 2 , Deborah Brown 3

NIHR HTA programme2018

35. Dementia And Physical Activity (DAPA) trial of moderate to high intensity exercise training for people with dementia: randomised controlled trial.

Dementia And Physical Activity (DAPA) trial of moderate to high intensity exercise training for people with dementia: randomised controlled trial. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the effect of a moderate to high intensity aerobic and strength exercise training programme on cognitive impairment and other outcomes in people with mild to moderate dementia. DESIGN: Multicentre, pragmatic, investigator masked, randomised controlled trial. SETTING: National Health Service primary care, community and memory (...) services, dementia research registers, and voluntary sector providers in 15 English regions. PARTICIPANTS: 494 people with dementia: 329 were assigned to an aerobic and strength exercise programme and 165 were assigned to usual care. Random allocation was 2:1 in favour of the exercise arm. INTERVENTIONS: Usual care plus four months of supervised exercise and support for ongoing physical activity, or usual care only. Interventions were delivered in community gym facilities and NHS premises. MAIN OUTCOME

BMJ2018

36. Identifying Performance Measures, Indicators and Targets to Monitor and Evaluate Dementia Strategies

Identifying Performance Measures, Indicators and Targets to Monitor and Evaluate Dementia Strategies

McMaster Health Forum2018

37. Anticholinergic drugs and risk of dementia: case-control study.

Anticholinergic drugs and risk of dementia: case-control study. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the association between the duration and level of exposure to different classes of anticholinergic drugs and subsequent incident dementia. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: General practices in the UK contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. PARTICIPANTS: 40 770 patients aged 65-99 with a diagnosis of dementia between April 2006 and July 2015, and 283 933 controls without dementia (...) . INTERVENTIONS: Daily defined doses of anticholinergic drugs coded using the Anticholinergic Cognitive Burden (ACB) scale, in total and grouped by subclass, prescribed 4-20 years before a diagnosis of dementia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Odds ratios for incident dementia, adjusted for a range of demographic and health related covariates. RESULTS: 14 453 (35%) cases and 86 403 (30%) controls were prescribed at least one anticholinergic drug with an ACB score of 3 (definite anticholinergic activity) during

BMJ2018

38. A third of people with dementia have treatable vision problems

A third of people with dementia have treatable vision problems NIHR DC | Signal - A third of people with dementia have treatable vision problems Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal A third of people with dementia have treatable vision problems Published on 27 September 2016 New data shows that around a third of people with dementia have serious vision problems, such as cataracts or short sightedness, more than the general population of that age. Levels are higher (...) still for people with dementia in care homes – about half have vision problems. Yet this study showed that many of the people with dementia and vision impairment had not received the right treatment. This often involves simple measures. For many, spectacles could have improved poor sight. A quarter had cataracts, which surgery could have corrected. Quality of life is known to improve if visual impairment is corrected. Failure to receive treatment may be due to lack of awareness amongst people

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

39. Coordinating care for people with long term conditions and dementia: room for improvement

Coordinating care for people with long term conditions and dementia: room for improvement NIHR DC | Signal - Coordinating care for people with long term conditions and dementia: room for improvement Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Coordinating care for people with long term conditions and dementia: room for improvement Published on 26 May 2016 New evidence shows that almost one fifth of people with dementia also have other serious conditions such as stroke (...) , diabetes and visual impairment. Services are not currently designed to provide adequate integrated care for people with dementia plus other conditions. For instance, people with dementia are less likely to get diabetes checks or cataract surgery than those without dementia. Carers are not routinely contacted, and there is a lack of guidance for health professionals covering more than one condition. Implications for practice include incorporating the impact of a diagnosis of dementia on pre-existing

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

40. A coping programme moderately reduces depression and anxiety in carers of people with dementia

A coping programme moderately reduces depression and anxiety in carers of people with dementia NIHR DC | Signal - A coping programme moderately reduces depression and anxiety in carers of people with dementia Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal A coping programme moderately reduces depression and anxiety in carers of people with dementia Published on 28 October 2015 This NIHR-funded trial found that a programme to support carers of people with dementia (...) was moderately effective in reducing carers’ depression and anxiety scores for up to two years. It was also cost-effective. The programme consisted of eight sessions delivered by psychology graduates, covering topics such as managing difficult behaviour, accessing support and planning for the future. One in three people over 65 develop dementia and family are often the primary caregivers. The findings of this trial support NICE recommendations that the psychological burden upon carers is assessed

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018