Latest & greatest articles for dementia

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Top results for dementia

181. Prediction rule: Risk score developed from routinely collected data by primary healthcare practitioners is useful to rule out dementia in 60?79?year-olds

Prediction rule: Risk score developed from routinely collected data by primary healthcare practitioners is useful to rule out dementia in 60?79?year-olds Risk score developed from routinely collected data by primary healthcare practitioners is useful to rule out dementia in 60–79 year-olds | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers (...) of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Risk score developed from routinely collected data by primary healthcare practitioners is useful to rule out dementia in 60–79 year-olds Article Text Diagnosis Prediction rule Risk score developed from routinely

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2016

182. Cohort study: Hypovitaminosis D predicts more rapid and severe cognitive deterioration in ethnically diverse older adults with and without dementia

Cohort study: Hypovitaminosis D predicts more rapid and severe cognitive deterioration in ethnically diverse older adults with and without dementia Hypovitaminosis D predicts more rapid and severe cognitive deterioration in ethnically diverse older adults with and without dementia | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional (...) accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Hypovitaminosis D predicts more rapid and severe cognitive deterioration in ethnically diverse older adults with and without dementia Article Text Care of the older person Cohort study Hypovitaminosis D predicts more rapid

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2016

183. Outcomes: Three simple questions have high utility for diagnosing dementia in the primary care setting

Outcomes: Three simple questions have high utility for diagnosing dementia in the primary care setting Three simple questions have high utility for diagnosing dementia in the primary care setting | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword (...) Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Three simple questions have high utility for diagnosing dementia in the primary care setting Article Text Electronic pages Outcomes Three simple questions have high utility for diagnosing dementia in the primary care setting A J Larner Correspondence to Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery

Evidence-Based Mental Health2016

184. Dementia: Report by the Secretariat

Dementia: Report by the Secretariat WHO IRIS: Dementia: report by the Secretariat Browse Related links Files in This Item: File Description Size Format 219.86 kB Adobe PDF Title: Dementia: report by the Secretariat Authors: Issue Date: 2016 Publisher: World Health Organization Place of publication: Geneva Language: English Subject: Gov't Doc #: EB139/3 URI: Appears in Collections: Items in WHO IRIS are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. |

WHO2016

185. Systematic review: Training programmes and mealtime assistance may improve eating performance for elderly long-term care residents with dementia

Systematic review: Training programmes and mealtime assistance may improve eating performance for elderly long-term care residents with dementia Training programmes and mealtime assistance may improve eating performance for elderly long-term care residents with dementia | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts (...) Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Training programmes and mealtime assistance may improve eating performance for elderly long-term care residents with dementia Article Text Care of the older person Systematic review Training programmes and mealtime assistance may

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2016

186. Systematic review: Non-pharmacological interventions for agitation in dementia: various strategies demonstrate effectiveness for care home residents; further research in home settings is needed

Systematic review: Non-pharmacological interventions for agitation in dementia: various strategies demonstrate effectiveness for care home residents; further research in home settings is needed Non-pharmacological interventions for agitation in dementia: various strategies demonstrate effectiveness for care home residents; further research in home settings is needed | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log (...) in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Non-pharmacological interventions for agitation in dementia: various strategies demonstrate effectiveness for care home residents; further

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2016

187. Cohort study: Community palliative care use by dementia sufferers may reduce emergency department use at end of life

Cohort study: Community palliative care use by dementia sufferers may reduce emergency department use at end of life Community palliative care use by dementia sufferers may reduce emergency department use at end of life | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search (...) for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Community palliative care use by dementia sufferers may reduce emergency department use at end of life Article Text Care of the older person Cohort study Community palliative care use by dementia sufferers may reduce emergency department use at end of life David Kenneth Wright , Amanda Digel Vandyk

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2016

188. Systematic review: Health professionals generally have more restrictive attitudes towards assisted dying in dementia than the public

Systematic review: Health professionals generally have more restrictive attitudes towards assisted dying in dementia than the public Health professionals generally have more restrictive attitudes towards assisted dying in dementia than the public | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your (...) user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Health professionals generally have more restrictive attitudes towards assisted dying in dementia than the public Article Text Care of the older person Systematic review Health professionals generally have more restrictive attitudes towards assisted dying

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2016

189. Primary and secondary prevention interventions for cognitive decline and dementia

Primary and secondary prevention interventions for cognitive decline and dementia Primary and secondary prevention interventions for cognitive decline and dementia - NIPH Selected items added to basket Close Vis søkefelt How can we help you today? Search for: Søk Menu • • Primary and secondary prevention interventions for cognitive decline and dementia Søk i Folkehelsa.no Search for: Søk Infectious diseases & Vaccines Close Mental & Physical health Close Environment & Lifestyle Close Health (...) in Norway Close Quality and Knowledge Close More topics Close Dementia is a syndrome characterised by deterioration in memory, thinking, behaviour, and the ability to perform everyday activities, which ultimately may lead to total dependence and death. Since the world’s population is steadily growing older, the number of people with dementia is also increasing. It is therefore of utmost importance to identify effective strategies to prevent or delay its onset. The key findings of this overview

Norwegian Institute of Public Health2016

190. Supporting carers of people with dementia

Supporting carers of people with dementia Supporting carers of people with dementia Dissemination Centre Search this site Supporting carers of people with dementia Dementia is becoming more common as we live longer. Caring for people with dementia is demanding, with increased dependency as the disease progresses and behaviour which is often challenging. Many carers are older and may have their own health problems as well. We need to know more about the needs of carers and which kinds of support (...) are likely to be most helpful. To find out about taking part in dementia research visit . The findings boiled down, alongside practical questions for healthcare professionals and patients. How can we help reduce depression and anxiety in carers? How much do we understand about the psychological issues involved in caring for a loved one? How common are continence problems and how do carers cope? A study looked at the impact of regular walking on the symptoms of dementia. A survey of health professionals

NIHR Dissemination Centre - Highlights2016

191. Miscellaneous: Promoting multilevel primary prevention of depression and diabetes during midlife may protect against dementia

Miscellaneous: Promoting multilevel primary prevention of depression and diabetes during midlife may protect against dementia Promoting multilevel primary prevention of depression and diabetes during midlife may protect against dementia | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user (...) name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Promoting multilevel primary prevention of depression and diabetes during midlife may protect against dementia Article Text Electronic pages Miscellaneous Promoting multilevel primary prevention of depression and diabetes during midlife may protect against

Evidence-Based Mental Health2016

192. Causes and risk factors: Mediterranean diet and treating diabetes and depression in old age may reduce dementia risk

Causes and risk factors: Mediterranean diet and treating diabetes and depression in old age may reduce dementia risk Mediterranean diet and treating diabetes and depression in old age may reduce dementia risk | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search (...) for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Mediterranean diet and treating diabetes and depression in old age may reduce dementia risk Article Text Electronic pages Causes and risk factors Mediterranean diet and treating diabetes and depression in old age may reduce dementia risk Michaela Defrancesco Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric

Evidence-Based Mental Health2016

193. Dementia

Dementia Dementia - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Dementia: Summary Dementia is a clinical syndrome of deterioration in mental function which interferes with activities of daily living (ADLs). It affects more than one cognitive domain (for example memory, language, orientation, or judgement) and social behaviour (for example, emotional control or motivation). Early (or young) onset dementia is generally defined as dementia that develops before 65 years of age. Mild cognitive (...) impairment is cognitive impairment that does not fulfil the diagnostic criteria for dementia — for example, only one cognitive domain is affected, or ADLs are not significantly affected. The most common subtypes of dementia include: Alzheimer's disease (50–75%) which often co-exists with vascular dementia. Vascular dementia (up to 20%). Dementia with Lewy bodies (10–15%). Frontotemporal dementia (2%). Modification of specific risk factors (in particular, cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2016

194. Memantine and Cognition in Parkinson's Disease Dementia/Dementia With Lewy Bodies: A Meta‐Analysis

Memantine and Cognition in Parkinson's Disease Dementia/Dementia With Lewy Bodies: A Meta‐Analysis 30363483 2018 11 14 2330-1619 3 2 2016 Mar-Apr Movement disorders clinical practice Mov Disord Clin Pract Memantine and Cognition in Parkinson's Disease Dementia/Dementia With Lewy Bodies: A Meta-Analysis. 161-167 10.1002/mdc3.12264 The aim of this work was to utilize meta-analysis in examining the effects of memantine on neuropsychological functioning in patients with Parkinson's disease (...) dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Included studies fulfilled these criteria: included objective cognitive measures, a comparison group of participants not taking memantine, and provided sufficient data for calculation of effect size. We examined effect sizes across global cognition and five specific neuropsychological domains. Moderator variables examined included neuropsychological domain, diagnostic cohort (PDD, DLB, or mixed PDD-DLB cohort), study design (open label or placebo

Movement disorders clinical practice2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

195. Detecting dementia: how hit and miss is this questionnaire?

Detecting dementia: how hit and miss is this questionnaire? Detecting dementia: how hit and miss is this questionnaire? - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By December 4, 2015 // In the UK, 9.9 million people are aged over 65 and it has been estimated that around 6.6% have dementia; in the over 85s, this may be as high as 50%. Dementia has been identified as a national priority in health and social care and recent guidelines have emphasized early diagnosis to help with planning (...) and management, though ‘screening’ for dementia remains the subject of debate. A questionnaire to identify possible dementia Currently, less than half those with dementia will be diagnosed as having it. There are lots of different ways of assessing people for possible dementia and no clear agreement about the best way to do it. One approach is to ask someone who knows the person about changes they’ve observed and a questionnaire that is commonly used for this purpose is the Informant Questionnaire

Evidently Cochrane2015

196. Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia and Antipsychotic Drug Use in the Elderly with Dementia in Korean Long-Term Care Facilities

Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia and Antipsychotic Drug Use in the Elderly with Dementia in Korean Long-Term Care Facilities 26688788 2018 11 13 2199-1154 2 4 2015 Dec Drugs - real world outcomes Drugs Real World Outcomes Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia and Antipsychotic Drug Use in the Elderly with Dementia in Korean Long-Term Care Facilities. 363-368 10.1007/s40801-015-0047-0 Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are known predictors (...) of institutionalization, lower quality of life, and caregiver distress. Guidelines recommend initial management with non-pharmacological means, but antipsychotic drugs are widely used for the treatment of certain BPSD. The objective of the current study is to analyze the prevalence of BPSD and antipsychotic drug use in long-term care facilities in Korea. Retrospective chart review and cross-sectional analysis was conducted with 529 residents diagnosed with dementia out of a total 835 residents in 20 long-term care

Drugs - real world outcomes2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

197. Changing practice in dementia care in the community: developing and testing evidence-based interventions, from timely diagnosis to end of life (EVIDEM)

Changing practice in dementia care in the community: developing and testing evidence-based interventions, from timely diagnosis to end of life (EVIDEM) Changing practice in dementia care in the community: developing and testing evidence-based interventions, from timely diagnosis to end of life (EVIDEM) Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose (...) a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} The programme has shown the benefits of interdisciplinarity collaboration in dementia research from diagnosis through to end-of-life care and demonstrated the value of mixed methodologies in addressing complex problems. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , & . Steve Iliffe, 1 ,* Jane Wilcock, 1 Vari Drennan, 2

NIHR HTA programme2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

198. Montreal Cognitive Assessment for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.

Montreal Cognitive Assessment for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. BACKGROUND: Dementia is a progressive syndrome of global cognitive impairment with significant health and social care costs. Global prevalence is projected to increase, particularly in resource-limited settings. Recent policy changes in Western countries to increase detection mandates a careful examination of the diagnostic accuracy of neuropsychological tests for dementia. OBJECTIVES: To determine (...) the diagnostic accuracy of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) at various thresholds for dementia and its subtypes. SEARCH METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS Previews, Science Citation Index, PsycINFO and LILACS databases to August 2012. In addition, we searched specialised sources containing diagnostic studies and reviews, including MEDION (Meta-analyses van Diagnostisch Onderzoek), DARE (Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects), HTA (Health Technology Assessment Database), ARIF

Cochrane2015

199. The Burden of Health Care Costs for Patients With Dementia in the Last 5 Years of Life.

The Burden of Health Care Costs for Patients With Dementia in the Last 5 Years of Life. BACKGROUND: Common diseases, particularly dementia, have large social costs for the U.S. population. However, less is known about the end-of-life costs of specific diseases and the associated financial risk for individual households. OBJECTIVE: To examine social costs and financial risks faced by Medicare beneficiaries 5 years before death. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort. SETTING: The HRS (Health (...) and Retirement Study). PARTICIPANTS: Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries, aged 70 years or older, who died between 2005 and 2010 (n = 1702), stratified into 4 groups: persons with a high probability of dementia or those who died because of heart disease, cancer, or other causes. MEASUREMENTS: Total social costs and their components, including Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance, out-of-pocket spending, and informal care, measured over the last 5 years of life; and out-of-pocket spending as a proportion

Annals of Internal Medicine2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro