Latest & greatest articles for dementia

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Top results for dementia

1. Memantine for dementia. (PubMed)

Memantine for dementia. BACKGROUND: Memantine is a moderate affinity uncompetitive antagonist of glutamate NMDA receptors. It is licensed for use in moderate and severe Alzheimer's disease (AD); in the USA, it is also widely used off-label for mild AD. OBJECTIVES: To determine efficacy and safety of memantine for people with dementia. To assess whether memantine adds benefit for people already taking cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs). SEARCH METHODS: We searched ALOIS, the Cochrane Dementia (...) and Cognitive Improvement Group's register of trials (http://www.medicine.ox.ac.uk/alois/) up to 25 March 2018. We examined clinical trials registries, press releases and posters of memantine manufacturers; and the web sites of the FDA, EMEA and NICE. We contacted authors and companies for missing information. SELECTION CRITERIA: Double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled, randomised trials of memantine in people with dementia. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We pooled and analysed data from four

2019 Cochrane

2. Computerised cognitive training for preventing dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment. (PubMed)

Computerised cognitive training for preventing dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment. BACKGROUND: The number of people living with dementia is increasing rapidly. Clinical dementia does not develop suddenly, but rather is preceded by a period of cognitive decline beyond normal age-related change. People at this intermediate stage between normal cognitive function and clinical dementia are often described as having mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Considerable research and clinical (...) efforts have been directed toward finding disease-modifying interventions that may prevent or delay progression from MCI to clinical dementia. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of at least 12 weeks of computerised cognitive training (CCT) on maintaining or improving cognitive function and preventing dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment. SEARCH METHODS: We searched to 31 May 2018 in ALOIS (www.medicine.ox.ac.uk/alois) and ran additional searches in MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL

2019 Cochrane

3. Association of Midlife Diet With Subsequent Risk for Dementia. (PubMed)

Association of Midlife Diet With Subsequent Risk for Dementia. Importance: Observational studies suggest that diet is linked to cognitive health. However, the duration of follow-up in many studies is not sufficient to take into account the long preclinical phase of dementia, and the evidence from interventional studies is not conclusive. Objective: To examine whether midlife diet is associated with subsequent risk for dementia. Design, Setting, and Participants: Population-based cohort study (...) established in 1985-1988 that had dietary intake assessed in 1991-1993, 1997-1999, and 2002-2004 and follow-up for incident dementia until March 31, 2017. Exposures: Food frequency questionnaire to derive the Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), an 11-component diet quality score (score range, 0-110), with higher scores indicating a healthier diet. Main Outcome and Measures: Incident dementia ascertained through linkage to electronic health records. Results: Among 8225 participants without dementia

2019 JAMA

4. AD-8 for detection of dementia across a variety of healthcare settings. (PubMed)

AD-8 for detection of dementia across a variety of healthcare settings. BACKGROUND: Dementia assessment often involves initial screening, using a brief tool, followed by more detailed assessment where required. The AD-8 is a short questionnaire, completed by a suitable 'informant' who knows the person well. AD-8 is designed to assess change in functional performance secondary to cognitive change. OBJECTIVES: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the informant-based AD-8 questionnaire (...) , in detection of all-cause (undifferentiated) dementia in adults. Where data were available, we described the following: the diagnostic accuracy of the AD-8 at various predefined threshold scores; the diagnostic accuracy of the AD-8 for each healthcare setting and the effects of heterogeneity on the reported diagnostic accuracy of the AD-8. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following sources on 27 May 2014, with an update to 7 June 2018: ALOIS (Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group), MEDLINE (Ovid

2019 Cochrane

5. Peri-operative care of people with dementia. Online Supporting Information

Peri-operative care of people with dementia. Online Supporting Information Online Supporting Information S1 Sources of further information S2 Quality assessment/quality improvement (QA/QI) toolkit S4 Abbey pain scale [90] S1 Sources of further information • Alzheimer’s Society, Royal College of Nursing. This is me. A support tool to enable person-centred care. This proforma can be completed pre- operatively by a person with cognitive impairment or their carers, to provide information (...) for hospital staff about how to care for that person when they are admitted for surgery. https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/download/downloads/id/3423/this_is_me.pdf (accessed 20/02/2018). • Alzheimer’s Society. Fix Dementia Care: Hospitals. January, 2016. This document describes the experiences of people with dementia admitted to hospital, and recommends care improvements that should be made. https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/download/downloads/id/2907/fix_dementia_care_- _hospitals.pdf (accessed 20/02/2018

2019 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

6. Peri-operative care of people with dementia

Peri-operative care of people with dementia Guidelines Peri-operative care of people with dementia February 2019Guidelines Guidelinesfortheperi-operativecareofpeoplewithdementia GuidelinesfromtheAssociationofAnaesthetists S.White, 1 R.Grif?ths, 2 M.Baxter, 3 T.Beanland, 4 J.Cross, 5 J.Dhesi, 6 A.B.Docherty, 7 I.Foo, 8 G.Jolly, 9 J.Jones, 10 I.K.Moppett, 11 E.Plunkett 12 andK.Sachdev 13 1ConsultantAnaesthetist,RoyalSussexCountyHospital,Brighton,UKandco-Chair,AssociationofAnaesthetists (...) 13ConsultantinOlderAdultPsychiatry,HomertonUniversityHospitalNHSFoundationTrust,London,UK Summary Ageing populations have greater incidences of dementia. People with dementia present for emergency and, increasingly, elective surgery, but are poorly served by the lack of available guidance on their peri-operative management, particularly relating to pharmacological, medico-legal, environmental and attitudinal considerations. These guidelines seek to deliver such guidance, by providing information for peri-operative care

2019 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

7. Quick guide: National clinical guideline on dementia and medicine

Quick guide: National clinical guideline on dementia and medicine National clinical guideline on dementia and medicine Published by the Danish Health Authority, December 2018 NATIONAL CLINICAL GUIDELINE ON DEMENTIA AND MEDICINE Quick guide It is good practice to consider a break in treatment in terms of discontinuation of dementia drugs during clinical observation for persons with very severe dementia. Good practice In the event of clinical worsening, including declining functional level (...) , increased need for care or increased incidence of behavioural disorders and psychological symptoms within 2-4 weeks of starting the break in treatment, the treatment should be resumed. It is essential to involve relatives and nursing staff in this assessment. Upon discontinuation of dementia drugs, clinical follow-up is recommended. Discontinue antipsychotic medication (as a general rule with tapering) in persons with dementia in long-term (> 3 months) treatment. Strong recommendation In general, long

2019 Danish National Clinical Guidelines

8. Traumatic Brain Injury and Dementia

Traumatic Brain Injury and Dementia 4 February 2019 Prepared for: Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Health Administration Health Services Research & Development Service Washington, DC 20420 Prepared by: Evidence Synthesis Program (ESP) Coordinating Center Portland VA Health Care System Portland, OR Mark Helfand, MD, MPH, MS, Director Evidence Brief: Traumatic Brain Injury and Dementia Authors: Kim Peterson, MS Stephanie Veazie, MPH Donald Bourne, MPH Johanna Anderson, MPH Evidence (...) Synthesis Program 4 Evidence Brief: TBI and Dementia Evidence Synthesis Program i PREFACE The VA Evidence Synthesis Program (ESP) was established in 2007 to provide timely and accurate syntheses of targeted healthcare topics of importance to clinicians, managers, and policymakers as they work to improve the health and healthcare of Veterans. These reports help: · Develop clinical policies informed by evidence; · Implement effective services to improve patient outcomes and to support VA clinical practice

2019 Veterans Affairs Evidence-based Synthesis Program Reports

9. Antidepressants do not help treat depression in people living with dementia

Antidepressants do not help treat depression in people living with dementia Antidepressants do not help treat depression in dementia Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Antidepressants do not help treat depression in people living with dementia Published on 8 January 2019 doi: Antidepressants do not reduce symptoms of depression in people with dementia compared with placebo (dummy pills). Measured 6 to 13 weeks after starting the treatment, there is little or no difference (...) in participants’ symptoms, but an increased chance of unwanted side effects. The review did not identify enough data to determine if antidepressants have an effect in the longer-term. This Cochrane review included randomised controlled trials of any antidepressant drugs compared to placebo. Participants were aged 75 years on average, with mild or moderate dementia. The quality of the included trials was mixed, with not enough information reported to fully assess the risk of bias, though the main result

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

10. Person-centred care improves quality of life for care home residents with dementia

Person-centred care improves quality of life for care home residents with dementia Signal - Person-centred care improves quality of life for care home residents with dementia Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Person-centred care improves quality of life for care home residents with dementia Published on 20 March 2018 A person-centred care intervention for people with dementia living in care homes improved their quality of life, reduced agitation and improved interactions (...) use, as this was low to start with, which is in line with policy to limit use. It supports the feasibility of the intervention, but there is a need to understand which components are most effective and could be implemented on a wide scale with sustainable effects. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? Over 400,000 older people currently live in care homes in the UK. This includes over a third of the UK population with dementia. Many people with dementia have complex care

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

11. A third of people with dementia have treatable vision problems

A third of people with dementia have treatable vision problems Signal - A third of people with dementia have treatable vision problems Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover A third of people with dementia have treatable vision problems Published on 27 September 2016 New data shows that around a third of people with dementia have serious vision problems, such as cataracts or short sightedness, more than the general population of that age. Levels are higher still for people (...) with dementia in care homes – about half have vision problems. Yet this study showed that many of the people with dementia and vision impairment had not received the right treatment. This often involves simple measures. For many, spectacles could have improved poor sight. A quarter had cataracts, which surgery could have corrected. Quality of life is known to improve if visual impairment is corrected. Failure to receive treatment may be due to lack of awareness amongst people with dementia and their carers

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

12. Coordinating care for people with long term conditions and dementia: room for improvement

Coordinating care for people with long term conditions and dementia: room for improvement Signal - Coordinating care for people with long term conditions and dementia: room for improvement Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Coordinating care for people with long term conditions and dementia: room for improvement Published on 26 May 2016 New evidence shows that almost one fifth of people with dementia also have other serious conditions such as stroke, diabetes and visual (...) impairment. Services are not currently designed to provide adequate integrated care for people with dementia plus other conditions. For instance, people with dementia are less likely to get diabetes checks or cataract surgery than those without dementia. Carers are not routinely contacted, and there is a lack of guidance for health professionals covering more than one condition. Implications for practice include incorporating the impact of a diagnosis of dementia on pre-existing conditions into care

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2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

13. Case managers improve outcomes for people with dementia and their carers

Case managers improve outcomes for people with dementia and their carers Case managers improve outcomes for people with dementia and their carers Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Case managers improve outcomes for people with dementia and their carers Published on 24 April 2018 Using a case manager to coordinate health and social care improves the challenging behaviour of people with dementia and reduces the burden on caregivers. Quality of life of caregivers improves (...) the most when case managers have a professional background in nursing. This NIHR-funded review compared the effectiveness of standard community treatment and interventions with case managers overseeing the interventions for people living with dementia. It considered evidence from 14 trials in a number of countries, with different health systems and support. Care coordination is variable across the UK, but this is often not provided by a qualified professional, so they are not able to develop and update

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

14. A staff training intervention to improve communication between people living with dementia and health-care professionals in hospital: the VOICE mixed-methods development and evaluation study

A staff training intervention to improve communication between people living with dementia and health-care professionals in hospital: the VOICE mixed-methods development and evaluation study A staff training intervention to improve communication between people living with dementia and health-care professionals in hospital: the VOICE mixed-methods development and evaluation study Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page (...) not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} VOICE communication training for health-care professionals working with people with dementia is likely to be beneficial to staff and patients, but further evaluation is necessary. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , , , & . Rowan

2019 NIHR HTA programme

15. France has delisted anti-dementia agents

France has delisted anti-dementia agents MED CHECK - TIP December 2018/ Vol.4 No.12 · Page 29 -The Informed Prescriber C N o 12 M ED HECK D e ce m b e r 2 0 1 8 Dying Cochrane: Could it be resuscitated? Herpes zoster subunit vaccine Shingrix: Baloxavir (Xofluza®) for Influenza: No Value No difference from Tamiflu in efficacy, and suppresses immunity Cochrane review on HPV vaccine should be revised: Due to missing trials, adjuvant toxicity, mortality and healthy user bias Editorial Dying

2019 Med Check - The Informed Prescriber

16. National clinical guideline for diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and dementia

National clinical guideline for diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and dementia National clinical guideline for diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and dementia Published by the Danish Health Authority, October 2018 NATIONAL CLINICAL GUIDELINE FOR DIAGNOSIS OF MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT AND DEMENTIA Quick guide Use a brief cognitive test as part of a basic clinical assessment of MCI or dementia in order to achieve a systematic, structured assessment of the level of cognitive functioning (...) . Strong recommendation A brief cognitive test cannot stand alone, and the results should always be understood in the light of other test results and the overall clinical context. Despite certain methodological weaknesses as regards the evidence base, the results indicate that a brief cognitive test contributes relevant information in the assessment of dementia and MCI. There is no documentation that a brief cognitive test alone can contribute significantly towards predicting which persons with MCI

2019 Danish National Clinical Guidelines

17. Communication training and its effects on carer and care-receiver outcomes in dementia settings: A systematic review

Communication training and its effects on carer and care-receiver outcomes in dementia settings: A systematic review 30357952 2018 11 21 1365-2702 2018 Oct 24 Journal of clinical nursing J Clin Nurs Communication training and its effects on carer and care-receiver outcomes in dementia settings: A systematic review. 10.1111/jocn.14697 To review communication interventions that aim to improve regular care interactions between people with dementia and their carers in various settings (...) ; and to examine the impact of such interventions on both carer and care-receiver outcomes. Effective communication is imperative to ensure quality of care for people living with dementia. Due to neurodegenerative changes, people with dementia encounter ongoing and progressive difficulties in both understanding and expressing themselves. This in turn creates challenges for carers, which highlights the need for equipping them with necessary communication skills to respond to the specific communication needs

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2019 EvidenceUpdates

18. Effect of Intensive vs Standard Blood Pressure Control on Probable Dementia: A Randomized Clinical Trial. (PubMed)

Effect of Intensive vs Standard Blood Pressure Control on Probable Dementia: A Randomized Clinical Trial. 30688979 2019 01 28 1538-3598 2019 Jan 28 JAMA JAMA Effect of Intensive vs Standard Blood Pressure Control on Probable Dementia: A Randomized Clinical Trial. 10.1001/jama.2018.21442 There are currently no proven treatments to reduce the risk of mild cognitive impairment and dementia. To evaluate the effect of intensive blood pressure control on risk of dementia. Randomized clinical trial (...) (intensive treatment group; n = 4678) or less than 140 mm Hg (standard treatment group; n = 4683). The primary cognitive outcome was occurrence of adjudicated probable dementia. Secondary cognitive outcomes included adjudicated mild cognitive impairment and a composite outcome of mild cognitive impairment or probable dementia. Among 9361 randomized participants (mean age, 67.9 years; 3332 women [35.6%]), 8563 (91.5%) completed at least 1 follow-up cognitive assessment. The median intervention period

2019 JAMA

19. Traditional Chinese herbal medicine for vascular dementia. (PubMed)

Traditional Chinese herbal medicine for vascular dementia. BACKGROUND: Traditional Chinese herbal medicine (TCHM) is widely used for treating vascular dementia (VaD) in China. Recent studies of a number of TCHMs have demonstrated in vitro biological activity and therapeutic effects in animals, but the published clinical evidence has not been systematically appraised. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of TCHMs listed in either the Chinese Pharmacopoeia (CP) or the Chinese National (...) Essential Drug List (NEDL) that are used to treat VaD. A secondary aim was to identify promising TCHMs for further clinical research. SEARCH METHODS: We searched ALOIS, the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group's Specialised Register (on 14 March 2018) and also several Chinese biomedical databases: the Chinese Biological Medicine Database (January 1979 to May 2015), Wanfang database (January 1998 to May 2015), Chongqing VIP Information Co. Ltd or Weipu (January 1998 to May 2015

2018 Cochrane

20. Agitation in Dementia: Quantifying the effects of antipsychotics

Agitation in Dementia: Quantifying the effects of antipsychotics Tools for Practice is proudly sponsored by the Alberta College of Family Physicians (ACFP). ACFP is a provincial, professional voluntary organization, representing more than 4,800 family physicians, family medicine residents, and medical students in Alberta. Established over sixty years ago, the ACFP strives for excellence in family practice through advocacy, continuing medical education and primary care research. www.acfp.ca (...) February 26, 2018 Agitation in Dementia: Quantifying the effects of antipsychotics Clinical Question: What are the benefits and harms of antipsychotics for agitation in dementia? Bottom Line: A strong placebo effect explains most of the perceived efficacy, with antipsychotics providing little additional improvement over placebo on agitation scales (~3 additional points out of 144). However, 50% improvement in behaviour occurs in ~46% on antipsychotic versus ~33% on placebo. Harms are serious (increased

2018 Tools for Practice