Latest & greatest articles for corticosteroids

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Top results for corticosteroids

161. Treating Atopic Dermatitis: Wet Wraps With Corticosteroids Versus Wet Wrap Therapy Without Corticosteroids

Treating Atopic Dermatitis: Wet Wraps With Corticosteroids Versus Wet Wrap Therapy Without Corticosteroids "Treating Atopic Dermatitis: Wet Wraps With Corticosteroids Versus Wet " by Jennie Hoke < > > > > > Off-campus Pacific University users: To download campus access theses and dissertations, please with your PUNet ID and password. Non-Pacific University users: Please talk to your librarian about requesting this thesis or dissertation through interlibrary loan. Theses or dissertations (...) , is usually reserved for children and adults with severe atopic dermatitis. The mainstay of treatment for atopic dermatitis has been emollients and topical corticosteroids. However, corticosteroids, especially when used long-term can have side effects that are a cause for concern. What additional benefits can be seen when adding a topical steroid to wet wrap therapy versus using emollient with wet wrap therapy alone? Methods: An exhaustive search of available medical literature was conducted using MEDLINE

Pacific University EBM Capstone Project2015

162. Association of Topical Corticosteroid Use and Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

Association of Topical Corticosteroid Use and Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis "Association of Topical Corticosteroid Use and Bone Mineral Density in " by Carsten Paulson < > > > > > Title Author Date of Award Summer 8-8-2015 Degree Type Capstone Project Degree Name Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies First Advisor Annjanette Sommers, PA-C, MS Rights . Abstract Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common pruritic inflammatory skin disease. First-line (...) therapy for AD involves the use of topical corticosteroids. With long-term use, these agents exert systemic effects and have been associated with adverse effects on bone health. This review assesses the current evidence for an association between topical corticosteroid use and bone mineral density in patients with atopic dermatitis. Methods An exhaustive search of available literature was conducted in using the MEDLINE-Ovid, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews Multifile

Pacific University EBM Capstone Project2015

163. Corticosteroids - topical (skin), nose, and eyes

Corticosteroids - topical (skin), nose, and eyes Corticosteroids - topical (skin), nose, and eyes - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Corticosteroids - topical (skin), nose, and eyes - Summary Corticosteroids are synthetic analogues of the natural hormones that are produced by the adrenal cortex. Local corticosteroids are predominantly glucocorticoids. They have 4 main effects: Anti-inflammatory. Immunosuppressive. Anti-proliferative (anti-mitotic). Vasoconstrictive. Topical (...) corticosteroids exert these effects on the skin: Eczema — the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects are important. Psoriasis — is characterized by rapid cell turnover, and the anti-mitotic effects are important. Intranasal corticosteroids exert these effects on the nasal mucosa. They relieve or prevent the symptoms associated with allergic rhinitis. They can also be used in the short-term to shrink nasal polyps. Corticosteroid eye preparations control inflammation of the eye due to allergy, trauma

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2015

164. Corticosteroids - oral

Corticosteroids - oral Corticosteroids - oral - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Corticosteroids - oral - Summary Corticosteroids are synthetic analogues of hormones produced by the adrenal cortex. Corticosteroids are either high in glucocorticoid or mineralocorticoid activity. Oral corticosteroids with a high glucocorticoid activity are: Betamethasone. Cortisone. Deflazacort. Dexamethasone. Hydrocortisone. Methylprednisolone. Prednisolone. Fludrocortisone acetate is an oral (...) corticosteroid with a high mineralocorticoid activity. Oral corticosteroids should only be prescribed following a firm clinical diagnosis. As a general principle, short courses of oral corticosteroids (less than 3 weeks) can be stopped abruptly. Gradual withdrawal should be considered for people whose disease is unlikely to relapse and who have: Received more than 3 weeks of corticosteroid treatment. Recently received repeated courses of corticosteroids (especially if taken for longer than 3 weeks

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2015

165. Corticosteroids - inhaled

Corticosteroids - inhaled Corticosteroids - inhaled - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Corticosteroids - inhaled - Summary Corticosteroids are synthetic analogues of hormones produced by the adrenal cortex. Inhaled corticosteroids are glucocorticoids and have 4 main effects, which are: Anti-inflammatory. Immunosuppressive. Anti-proliferative (anti-mitotic). Vasoconstrictive. Inhaled corticosteroids exert these effects on the airways to reduce inflammation, oedema, and mucus secretion (...) . Because they are delivered directly to the lungs (via a number of devices), they cause fewer systemic adverse effects than oral corticosteroids. Inhaled corticosteroids available in the UK include: Beclometasone dipropionate (aerosol inhaler and dry powder inhaler). Budesonide (dry powder inhaler, aerosol inhaler, and single dose units for nebulization). Ciclesonide (aerosol inhaler). Fluticasone propionate (dry powder inhaler, aerosol inhaler, and single dose units for nebulization). Mometasone

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2015

166. Randomised controlled trial: Similar clinical outcomes but more healthcare use in shoulder impingement patients following corticosteroid injection compared with physical therapy

Randomised controlled trial: Similar clinical outcomes but more healthcare use in shoulder impingement patients following corticosteroid injection compared with physical therapy Similar clinical outcomes but more healthcare use in shoulder impingement patients following corticosteroid injection compared with physical therapy | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Similar clinical outcomes but more healthcare use in shoulder impingement patients following corticosteroid injection compared with physical therapy Article Text Therapeutics

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2015

168. Corticosteroid Injections Accelerate Pain Relief and Recovery of Function Compared With Oral NSAIDs in Patients With Adhesive Capsulitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Corticosteroid Injections Accelerate Pain Relief and Recovery of Function Compared With Oral NSAIDs in Patients With Adhesive Capsulitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial 26657263 2016 02 02 2016 09 19 2016 02 02 1552-3365 44 2 2016 Feb The American journal of sports medicine Am J Sports Med Corticosteroid Injections Accelerate Pain Relief and Recovery of Function Compared With Oral NSAIDs in Patients With Adhesive Capsulitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial. 474-81 10.1177/0363546515616238 Intra (...) -articular corticosteroid injection is a common therapy for adhesive capsulitis, but there is a lack of prospective randomized controlled studies analyzing the efficacy of single injections applied blindly to accelerate improvement in pain and function. In patients with adhesive capsulitis, a single intra-articular corticosteroid injection without image control applied before the beginning of a physical therapy program will accelerate pain relief and recovery of function compared with oral

EvidenceUpdates2015

169. Treating tennis elbow (lateral epicondylalgia) with corticosteroid injections are beneficial in the short term but harmful in the long term

Treating tennis elbow (lateral epicondylalgia) with corticosteroid injections are beneficial in the short term but harmful in the long term

Swedish Council on Technology Assessement2014

170. Intra-articular and soft tissue injections, a systematic review of relative efficacy of various corticosteroids

Intra-articular and soft tissue injections, a systematic review of relative efficacy of various corticosteroids Intra-articular and soft tissue injections, a systematic review of relative efficacy of various corticosteroids Intra-articular and soft tissue injections, a systematic review of relative efficacy of various corticosteroids Garg N, Perry L, Deodhar A CRD summary This review concluded that there was insufficient evidence on the comparative efficacy of different corticosteroid (...) injections. A few trials favoured triamcinolone hexacetonide over the other corticosteroids. These conclusions reflect the evidence presented and appear to be reliable. Authors' objectives To determine the comparative efficacy of corticosteroid injections for intra-articular or periarticular soft tissue injections. Searching MEDLINE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched in October or November 2013, for articles

DARE.2014

171. Pegylated interferon-alpha-2b reduces corticosteroid requirement in patients with Behcet's disease with upregulation of circulating regulatory T cells and reduction of Th17

Pegylated interferon-alpha-2b reduces corticosteroid requirement in patients with Behcet's disease with upregulation of circulating regulatory T cells and reduction of Th17 25269831 2015 05 09 2015 07 28 2016 11 25 1468-2060 74 6 2015 Jun Annals of the rheumatic diseases Ann. Rheum. Dis. Pegylated interferon-α-2b reduces corticosteroid requirement in patients with Behçet's disease with upregulation of circulating regulatory T cells and reduction of Th17. 1138-44 10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-205571 (...) To determine whether the addition of 26 weeks of subcutaneous peginterferon-α-2b could reduce the requirement for systemic corticosteroids and conventional immunosuppressive medication in patients with Behçet's disease (BD). We conducted a multicentre randomised trial in patients with BD requiring systemic therapy. Patients were randomised to 26 weeks of peginterferon-α-2b in addition to their standard care or to standard care only and followed 6-monthly for 3 years with BD activity scores and quality

EvidenceUpdates2014

172. Are inhaled corticosteroids effective for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

Are inhaled corticosteroids effective for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease? Are inhaled corticosteroids effective for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease? Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Are inhaled corticosteroids effective for patients (...) with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease? View/ Open Date 2010-02 Format Metadata Abstract In patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) do not decrease the risk of all-cause mortality when compared with or added to nonsteroid inhaled therapy, although they increase the risk of pneumonia. (SOR A, based on 2 meta- analyses.) Combination therapy with ICS and long-acting β2-agonists (LABA) is associated with a lower incidence of moderate (but not severe) COPD exacerbations and

Evidence Based Practice 2014

173. Use of antenatal corticosteroids and tocolytic drugs in preterm births in 29 countries: an analysis of the WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health.

Use of antenatal corticosteroids and tocolytic drugs in preterm births in 29 countries: an analysis of the WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health. BACKGROUND: Despite the global burden of morbidity and mortality associated with preterm birth, little evidence is available for use of antenatal corticosteroids and tocolytic drugs in preterm births in low-income and middle-income countries. We analysed data from the WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health (WHOMCS (...) ) to assess coverage for these interventions in preterm deliveries. METHODS: WHOMCS is a facility-based, cross-sectional survey database of birth outcomes in 359 facilities in 29 countries, with data collected prospectively from May 1, 2010, to Dec 31, 2011. For this analysis, we included deliveries after 22 weeks' gestation and we excluded births that occurred outside a facility or quicker than 3 h after arrival. We calculated use of antenatal corticosteroids in women who gave birth between 26 and 34

Lancet2014

174. What are the benefits and risks of inhaled corticosteroids for COPD?

What are the benefits and risks of inhaled corticosteroids for COPD? What are the benefits and risks of inhaled corticosteroids for COPD? Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics What are the benefits and risks of inhaled corticosteroids for COPD? View/ Open Date 2014-05 Format Metadata Abstract Q: What (...) are the benefits and risks of inhaled corticosteroids for COPD? A: Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), either alone or with a long-acting [beta] agonist (LABA), reduce the frequency of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and statistically, but not clinically, improve quality of life (QOL) (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, meta-analyses of heterogeneous studies). However, ICS have no mortality benefit and don’t consistently improve forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (SOR: B

Clinical Inquiries2014

175. One-year outcome of subacromial corticosteroid injection compared with manual physical therapy for the management of the unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome: a pragmatic randomized trial.

One-year outcome of subacromial corticosteroid injection compared with manual physical therapy for the management of the unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome: a pragmatic randomized trial. BACKGROUND: Corticosteroid injections (CSIs) and physical therapy are used to treat patients with the shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) but have never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of 2 common nonsurgical treatments for SIS. DESIGN: Randomized, single-blind, comparative

Annals of Internal Medicine2014

176. Psychiatric Adverse Effects of Pediatric Corticosteroid Use

Psychiatric Adverse Effects of Pediatric Corticosteroid Use 24943696 2014 06 19 2014 08 13 2014 06 19 1942-5546 89 6 2014 Jun Mayo Clinic proceedings Mayo Clin. Proc. Psychiatric adverse effects of pediatric corticosteroid use. 817-34 10.1016/j.mayocp.2014.01.010 S0025-6196(14)00063-9 Corticosteroids, highly effective drugs for myriad disease states, have considerable neuropsychiatric adverse effects that can manifest in cognitive disorders, behavioral changes, and frank psychiatric disease (...) . Recent reviews have summarized these effects in adults, but a comprehensive review on corticosteroid effects in children has not been published since 2005. Here, we systematically review articles published since then that, we find, naturally divide into 3 main areas: (1) chronic effects of acute prenatal and neonatal exposure associated with prematurity and congenital conditions; (2) immediate behavioral effects of acute exposure via oncological protocols; and (3) acute behavioral effects of sporadic

EvidenceUpdates2014

177. Combination inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting beta2-agonists for children and adults with bronchiectasis.

Combination inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting beta2-agonists for children and adults with bronchiectasis. BACKGROUND: Bronchiectasis is a major contributor to chronic respiratory morbidity and mortality worldwide. Wheeze and other asthma-like symptoms and bronchial hyperreactivity may occur in people with bronchiectasis. Physicians often use asthma treatments in patients with bronchiectasis. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of inhaled long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA) combined (...) with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in children and adults with bronchiectasis during (1) acute exacerbations and (2) stable state. SEARCH METHODS: The Cochrane Airways Group searched the the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of Trials, which includes records identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and other databases. The Cochrane Airways Group performed the latest searches in October 2013. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised controlled trials

Cochrane2014

178. Use of corticosteroids after hepatoportoenterostomy for bile drainage in infants with biliary atresia: the START randomized clinical trial.

Use of corticosteroids after hepatoportoenterostomy for bile drainage in infants with biliary atresia: the START randomized clinical trial. IMPORTANCE: Biliary atresia is the most common cause of end-stage liver disease in children. Controversy exists as to whether use of steroids after hepatoportoenterostomy improves clinical outcome. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the addition of high-dose corticosteroids after hepatoportoenterostomy is superior to surgery alone in improving biliary drainage

JAMA2014

179. Long-acting beta-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review of the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness

Long-acting beta-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review of the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness Long-acting beta-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review of the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness Long-acting beta-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review of the clinical efficacy and cost (...) -effectiveness CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation CADTH. Long-acting beta-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review of the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response - Summary with Critical

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2014

180. Sacroiliac joint injections with corticosteroids for treatment of chronic low back pain

Sacroiliac joint injections with corticosteroids for treatment of chronic low back pain Sacroiliac joint injections with corticosteroids for treatment of chronic low back pain Sacroiliac joint injections with corticosteroids for treatment of chronic low back pain Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Sacroiliac joint injections with corticosteroids for

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2014