Latest & greatest articles for constipation

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Top results for constipation

1. Constipation

Constipation Constipation - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Constipation: Summary Constipation is a symptom-based disorder which describes defecation that is unsatisfactory because of infrequent stools, difficulty passing stools, or the sensation of incomplete emptying. The Rome IV diagnostic criteria for constipation include spontaneous bowel movements occurring less than three times a week. Chronic constipation usually describes symptoms which are present for at least 12 weeks (...) in the preceding six months. Faecal loading/impaction describes retention of faeces to the extent that spontaneous evacuation is unlikely. Functional (primary or idiopathic)constipation is chronic constipation without a known cause. Secondary (organic) constipation is constipation caused by a drug or underlying medical condition. Constipation may occur at any age but is more common in women, the elderly, and during pregnancy. Assessment of a person with constipation should include: Any red flag symptoms

2015 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2. Constipation in older adults: Stepwise approach to keep things moving

Constipation in older adults: Stepwise approach to keep things moving Constipation in older adults | The College of Family Physicians of Canada Main menu User menu Search Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Research Article Practice Constipation in older adults Stepwise approach to keep things moving Brenda G. Schuster , Lynette Kosar and Rejina Kamrul Canadian Family Physician February 2015, 61 (2) 152-158; Brenda G. Schuster Clinical Pharmacist in the Academic Family Medicine Unit (...) , Regina Division, at the University of Saskatchewan, and Academic Detailer for the RxFiles Academic Detailing Program. Lynette Kosar Clinical Pharmacist for the RxFiles Academic Detailing Program. Rejina Kamrul Assistant Professor in the Academic Family Medicine Unit, Regina Division. Constipation is a common complaint and challenge for older adults. The prevalence of constipation increases with age and differs among settings. In individuals 65 years of age or older in the community, the prevalence

2016 RxFiles

3. Palliative care - constipation

Palliative care - constipation Palliative care - constipation - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - constipation: Summary Constipation is defecation that is unsatisfactory because of infrequent stools, difficult stool passage, or seemingly incomplete defecation. Stools are often dry and hard, and may be abnormally large or abnormally small. About 80% of people with cancer will require treatment with laxatives at some time. People receiving palliative care have multiple (...) causes of constipation, such as: Drugs, for example, opioid analgesics, antimuscarinic drugs, antacids. Secondary effects of disease, for example, dehydration, inadequate dietary fibre, inactivity, delirium, spinal cord compression, lack of privacy. Direct effects of malignant tumours, causing bowel obstruction, hypercalcaemia, nerve damage. When assessing a person with constipation in palliative care: The history should include information about the frequency and character of stools, discomfort

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

6. Constipation in children

Constipation in children Constipation in children - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Constipation in children: Summary Constipation is a decrease in the frequency of bowel movements characterized by the passing of hardened stools which may be large and associated with straining and pain. Normal stool frequency in children ranges from an average of 4 per day in the first week of life to 2 per day at 1 year of age. Passing between 3 stools per day and 3 per week is usually attained (...) by 4 years of age. Constipation is termed idiopathic (functional) if it cannot be explained by any anatomical or physiological abnormality. Contributing factors for constipation include pain, fever, inadequate fluid intake, reduced dietary fibre intake, toilet training issues, the effects of drugs, psychosocial issues, and a family history of constipation. Two or more of the following clinical features indicate that a child is constipated: Fewer than three complete stools per week (unless

2015 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

7. Managing functional constipation in children

Managing functional constipation in children Constipation is a common childhood problem, with both somatic and psychological effects. The etiology of paediatric constipation is likely multifactorial, and seldom due to organic pathology. Children benefit from prompt and thorough management of this disorder. The goal of treatment is to produce soft, painless stools and to prevent reaccumulation of feces. Education, behavioural modification, daily maintenance stool softeners and dietary (...) modification are all important components of therapy. Fecal disimpaction may be necessary at the outset of treatment. Investigations are rarely necessary. Polyethylene glycol is a safe, effective and well-tolerated long-term treatment for constipation. Regular follow-up for children with constipation is important. Referral to a gastroenterologist should be made in refractory cases or when there is a suspicion of organic pathology. Key Words: Constipation; Encopresis; Laxative; Paediatric

2011 Canadian Paediatric Society

8. Constipation

Constipation Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines - Constipation Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines search / / / Constipation Constipation Introduction Constipation is the passage of small, hard faeces infrequently or with difficulty, and less often than is normal for that individual. Constipation can cause unpleasant symptoms such as abdominal and rectal pain, distension, and other negative effects on the patient’s wellbeing. As well as the physical suffering, constipation can cause (...) psychological distress and agitation in the terminally ill patient. There are many reasons why palliative care patients may develop constipation and these are discussed below. Constipation can be complex and may require specialist advice if the current treatment regime is not successful. Assessment A full assessment of the patient and their symptoms should be obtained looking at: normal and current bowel pattern (frequency, consistency, ease of passage, blood present, pain on passing stool) current

2016 Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines

9. Constipation

Constipation Evidence Maps - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading

2018 Trip Evidence Maps

10. Laxatives for the management of constipation in people receiving palliative care. (PubMed)

Laxatives for the management of constipation in people receiving palliative care. This article describes the second update of a Cochrane review on the effectiveness of laxatives for the management of constipation in people receiving palliative care. Previous versions were published in 2006 and 2010 where we also evaluated trials of methylnaltrexone; these trials have been removed as they are included in another review in press. In these earlier versions, we drew no conclusions on individual (...) effectiveness of different laxatives because of the limited number of evaluations. This is despite constipation being common in palliative care, generating considerable suffering due to the unpleasant physical symptoms and the availability of a wide range of laxatives with known differences in effect in other populations.To determine the effectiveness and differential efficacy of laxatives used to manage constipation in people receiving palliative care.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled

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2015 Cochrane

11. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Evaluation and Management of Constipation

Clinical Practice Guideline for the Evaluation and Management of Constipation Copyright © The American Society of Colon & Rectal Surgeons, Inc. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. 479 Diseases of the Colon & ReCtum Volume 59: 6 (2016) t he a merican s ociety of Colon and Rectal surgeons is dedicated to assuring high-quality patient care by advancing the science, prevention, and manage- ment of disorders and diseases of the colon, rectum, and anus. t he Clinical Practice (...) - ment regarding the propriety of any specific procedure must be made by the physician in light of all of the cir- cumstances presented by the individual patient. STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM Constipation is a benign condition that can have a signifi- cant impact on quality of life. t he prevalence has been es- timated to be as high as 30% in select populations and has been noted to be higher in women, nonwhites, those aged >65 years, and those with lower socioeconomic status. 1–6 Constipation

2016 American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

12. Constipation in Elderly Patients with Noncancer Pain: Focus on Opioid-Induced Constipation. (PubMed)

Constipation in Elderly Patients with Noncancer Pain: Focus on Opioid-Induced Constipation. Constipation is a common and often debilitating condition in the elderly, which may be caused by underlying disease conditions, structural abnormalities in the bowel, and a variety of medications such as anticholinergics, antidepressants, and opiates. In this review, we focus on opioid-induced constipation (OIC), which is often underrecognized and undertreated in the elderly. When opioid therapy (...) is initiated, healthcare providers are encouraged to evaluate risk factors for the development of constipation as part of a thorough patient history. To this end, the patient assessment should include the use of validated instruments, such as the Bristol Stool Scale and Bowel Function Index, to confirm the diagnosis and provide a basis for evaluating treatment outcomes. Healthcare providers should use a stepwise approach to the treatment of OIC in the elderly. Conventional laxatives are a first-line option

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2016 Drugs & Aging

13. Easing the strain: put your feet up for constipation

Easing the strain: put your feet up for constipation Easing the strain: put your feet up for constipation - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By February 24, 2016 // In this guest blog, pelvic physiotherapist and comedian Elaine Miller tells us what we need to know to avoid constipation and when the going gets tough. This is the third blog in our new series Evidence for Everyday Health Choices. Constipation is a miserable condition which can worsen co-morbidities like low back pain, muscle (...) can cause constipation, particularly in children – it’s best to move your bowels when you feel the first urge. Poo position You can help reduce the stress on the tissues and reduce straining by squatting to pass a bowel movement. This position encourages the pelvic floor to relax. This can be mimicked on a Western style toilet by raising the feet on a low stool. A stool stool, if you will. Sitting with hips at 90 degrees means the puborectalis muscle is not relaxed, which means the kink

2016 Evidently Cochrane

14. Constipation in children

Constipation in children Constipation in children - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Constipation in children Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: February 2019 Summary Childhood constipation is typically characterised by infrequent bowel evacuations, large stools, and difficult or painful defecation. Symptoms may result from low fibre, poor nutrient, and/or insufficient water intake, which leads (...) to excessive hardening of the stool. This often starts as an acute problem but can progress to faecal impaction and chronic constipation. Particularly in young children, any cause of painful defecation may provoke active withholding. Withholding may worsen the constipation and lead to a vicious cycle. Duration of constipation and amount of stool burden may depend on capacity of the child's rectum, the degree of megarectum, and other factors including rectal sensory function. After faecal disimpaction

2018 BMJ Best Practice

15. Diagnosis, Assessment and Management of Constipation in Advanced Cancer: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines

Diagnosis, Assessment and Management of Constipation in Advanced Cancer: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES Diagnosis, assessment and management of constipation in advanced cancer: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines † P. J. Larkin 1,2 , N. I. Cherny 3 , D. La Carpia 4 , M. Guglielmo 5 , C. Ostgathe 6 , F. Scotte ´ 7 & C. I. Ripamonti 5 ,on behalf of the ESMO Guidelines Committee * 1 School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Systems, University College Dublin, Dublin; 2 (...) Department of Medical Oncology and Supportive Care, Foch Hospital, Suresnes, France *Correspondence to: ESMO Guidelines Committee, ESMO Head Of?ce, Via Ginevra 4, 6900 Lugano, Switzerland. E-mail: clinicalguidelines@esmo.org † Approved by the ESMO Guidelines Committee: March 2018. Introduction Constipation is a common problem in patients with advanced can- cer and a signi?cant source of major morbidity and distress, which is often under-appreciated [1]. Constipation is subjectively experi- enced

2018 European Society for Medical Oncology

16. Constipation

Constipation American Gastroenterological Association If you're seeing this message, that means JavaScript has been disabled on your browser , please enable JS to make this app work.

2013 American Gastroenterological Association Institute

17. Efficacy of pharmacological therapies for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation: systematic review and meta-analysis

Efficacy of pharmacological therapies for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation: systematic review and meta-analysis Efficacy of pharmacological therapies for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation: systematic review and meta-analysis Efficacy of pharmacological therapies for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation: systematic review and meta-analysis Ford AC, Brenner DM, Schoenfeld PS CRD summary This review found that μ-opioid receptor antagonists were safe and effective (...) for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation. There was some concern over uncertain trial quality but the results appear to be reliable. The conclusion on safety may be overstated given the evidence. Authors' objectives To investigate the evidence for the benefits of pharmacological therapies for opiate-induced constipation. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane CENTRAL were searched to December 2012 without language restrictions. Search terms were presented. Conference proceedings and reference lists

2014 DARE.

18. Treatments for Constipation

Treatments for Constipation TITLE: Treatments for Constipation: A Review of Systematic Reviews DATE: 17 November 2014 CONTEXT AND POLICY ISSUES Constipation has many definitions and is often described differently depending on the population queried. Physicians may define constipation as a reduction in the frequency of bowel movements to fewer than three times per week while patients identify more with the symptoms associated with constipation such as difficulty passing stool, hard stool (...) consistency, feelings of abdominal cramping, and feelings of incomplete stool passage. 1 Causes of constipation may be primary (idiopathic) or secondary to other factors such as diet, medication, or medical conditions. 2 Constipation can affect anyone as a minor annoyance but up to a quarter of the population experiences it chronically or severely. 2 It can substantially affect quality of life and be debilitating. 2 It is estimated that between 2% to 27% of the population are affected depending upon

2014 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

19. Naloxegol (Moventig) and opioid-induced constipation. Its abdominal adverse effects are probably as troublesome as constipation

Naloxegol (Moventig) and opioid-induced constipation. Its abdominal adverse effects are probably as troublesome as constipation Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Naloxegol (Moventig°) and opioid-induced constipation. Its abdominal adverse effects are probably as troublesome as constipation'', 1 October 2017 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Naloxegol (Moventig°) and opioid-induced constipation. Its abdominal adverse effects are probably as troublesome as constipation Spotlight Every month, the subjects (...) in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Naloxegol (Moventig°) and opioid-induced constipation. Its abdominal adverse effects are probably as troublesome as constipation FEATURED REVIEW Naloxegol tablets have been authorised in the European Union for adults with troublesome opioid-induced constipation despite laxative therapy. Does naloxegol relieve discomfort in these patients? What

2017 Prescrire

20. Evaluation and Treatment of Functional Constipation in Infants and Children: Evidence-Based Recommendations from ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN

Evaluation and Treatment of Functional Constipation in Infants and Children: Evidence-Based Recommendations from ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN Copyright 2014 by ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. Evaluation and Treatment of Functional Constipation in Infants and Children: Evidence-Based Recommendations From ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN M.M. Tabbers, C. DiLorenzo, M.Y. Berger, C. Faure, M.W. Langendam, S. Nurko, A. Staiano, Y. Vandenplas, and M.A. Benninga ABSTRACT (...) Background:Constipationisapediatricproblemcommonlyencounteredby many health care workers in primary, secondary, and tertiary care. To assist medical care providers in the evaluation and management of children with functional constipation, the North American Society for Pediatric Gastro- enterology,Hepatology,andNutritionandtheEuropeanSocietyforPediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition were charged with the task of developing a uniform document of evidence-based guidelines. Methods: Nine clinical questions addressing diagnostic, therapeutic

2014 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition