Latest & greatest articles for constipation

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Top results for constipation

161. How useful is docusate in patients at risk for constipation: a systematic review of the evidence in the chronically ill

How useful is docusate in patients at risk for constipation: a systematic review of the evidence in the chronically ill How useful is docusate in patients at risk for constipation: a systematic review of the evidence in the chronically ill How useful is docusate in patients at risk for constipation: a systematic review of the evidence in the chronically ill Hurdon V, Viola R, Schroder C Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of docusate for constipation in chronic illness. Searching (...) Searches were conducted of the following sources for articles published after 1940: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE (Issue 3) and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register using the terms 'constipation', 'dioctyl', and 'docusate'; MEDLINE (1966 to April 1997) and CINAHL (1982 to April 1997) using the terms 'constipation' and 'docusate' and 'dioctyl', both as subject headings and textwords, 'doxidan' as a textword, and 'docusate' via its MEDLINE drug registry number. Floating sub-headings

DARE.2000

162. Methylnaltrexone for reversal of constipation due to chronic methadone use: a randomized controlled trial.

Methylnaltrexone for reversal of constipation due to chronic methadone use: a randomized controlled trial. 10647800 2000 02 10 2000 02 10 2016 11 24 0098-7484 283 3 2000 Jan 19 JAMA JAMA Methylnaltrexone for reversal of constipation due to chronic methadone use: a randomized controlled trial. 367-72 Constipation is the most common chronic adverse effect of opioid pain medications in patients who require long-term opioid administration, such as patients with advanced cancer, but conventional (...) measures for ameliorating constipation often are insufficient. To evaluate the efficacy of methylnaltrexone, the first peripheral opioid receptor antagonist, in treating chronic methadone-induced constipation. Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial conducted between May 1997 and December 1998. Clinical research center of a university hospital. Twenty-two subjects (9 men and 13 women; mean [SD] age, 43.2 [5.5] years) enrolled in a methadone maintenance program and having methadone-induced

JAMA2000

163. Interventions for treating constipation in pregnancy.

Interventions for treating constipation in pregnancy. BACKGROUND: Circulating progesterone may be the cause of slower gastrointestinal movement in mid and late pregnancy. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of different methods for treating constipation in pregnancy. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and Medline (1987 to 1997). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (...) of any treatment for constipation in pregnancy. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Trial quality assessments and data extraction were done independently by two reviewers. MAIN RESULTS: One trial of 40 women was included. Fibre supplements increased the frequency of defaecation (odds ratio 0.18, 95% confidence interval 0.05 to 0.67), and lead to softer stools. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Dietary supplements of fibre in the form of bran or wheat fibre are likely to help women experiencing constipation

Cochrane2000

164. Abdominal massage therapy for chronic constipation: a systematic review of controlled clinical trials

Abdominal massage therapy for chronic constipation: a systematic review of controlled clinical trials Abdominal massage therapy for chronic constipation: a systematic review of controlled clinical trials Abdominal massage therapy for chronic constipation: a systematic review of controlled clinical trials Ernst E Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of abdominal massage therapy for chronic constipation. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CISCOM and the Cochrane Library were searched to June (...) 1997 using the following search terms: massage; abdominal massage; manual therapy; constipation; complementary medicine; alternative medicine; and controlled clinical trials. Experts in the field were contacted for published and unpublished material and the author's own files were scanned. Bibliographies of retrieved studies were reviewed. No language restrictions were applied. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review Controlled trials of abdominal massage conducted

DARE.1999

165. Intolerance of cow's milk and chronic constipation in children.

Intolerance of cow's milk and chronic constipation in children. 9770556 1998 10 15 1998 10 15 2004 11 17 0028-4793 339 16 1998 Oct 15 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Intolerance of cow's milk and chronic constipation in children. 1100-4 Chronic diarrhea is the most common gastrointestinal symptom of intolerance of cow's milk among children. On the basis of a prior open study, we hypothesized that intolerance of cow's milk can also cause severe perianal lesions with pain (...) on defecation and consequent constipation in young children. We performed a double-blind, crossover study comparing cow's milk with soy milk in 65 children (age range, 11 to 72 months) with chronic constipation (defined as having one bowel movement every 3 to 15 days). All had been referred to a pediatric gastroenterology clinic and had previously been treated with laxatives without success; 49 had anal fissures and perianal erythema or edema. After 15 days of observation, the patients received cow's milk

NEJM1998

166. The treatment of chronic constipation in adults: a systematic review

The treatment of chronic constipation in adults: a systematic review The treatment of chronic constipation in adults: a systematic review The treatment of chronic constipation in adults: a systematic review Tramonte S M, Brand M B, Mulrow C D, Amato M G, O'Keefe M E, Ramirez G Authors' objectives To evaluate whether laxatives and fibre therapy improve symptoms and bowel movement frequency in adults with chronic constipation. Searching The following sources were searched: MEDLINE from 1966 (...) included in the review were psyllium, ispaghula, bran, prucara, lactulose, lactitol, propylethylene glycol, docusate sodium, docusate calcium, cisapride, senna, agiolax, lunelax, calcium polycarbophil, methylcellulose, magnesium hydroxide, laxamucil, sorbitol, dorbanex and sodium picosulphate. Participants included in the review Patients with a constipation for a minimum of two weeks, whose constipation was treated for a minimum of one week. Patients from special populations, such as peripartum

DARE.1997

167. Biofeedback training in treatment of childhood constipation: a randomised controlled study.

Biofeedback training in treatment of childhood constipation: a randomised controlled study. 8813983 1996 10 31 1996 10 31 2015 06 16 0140-6736 348 9030 1996 Sep 21 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Biofeedback training in treatment of childhood constipation: a randomised controlled study. 776-80 Because abnormal defaecation dynamics, which can be modified by biofeedback, are considered to be the underlying problem in constipation, biofeedback training may be a useful treatment for constipation (...) . This treatment has mainly been studied in uncontrolled trials. We evaluated defaecation dynamics and clinical outcome in chronically constipated children in a randomised study comparing conventional treatment and conventional treatment with biofeedback training. Patients, 5 to 16 years old, were referred to the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam by general practitioners, school doctors, paediatricians, and psychiatrists. They had to fulfil at least two of four criteria for paediatric constipation and were

Lancet1996

168. Chronic constipation in long stay elderly patients: a comparison of lactulose and a senna-fibre combination.

Chronic constipation in long stay elderly patients: a comparison of lactulose and a senna-fibre combination. 8219947 1993 12 22 1993 12 22 2013 09 19 0959-8138 307 6907 1993 Sep 25 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Chronic constipation in long stay elderly patients: a comparison of lactulose and a senna-fibre combination. 769-71 To compare the efficacy and cost effectiveness of a senna-fibre combination and lactulose in treating constipation in long stay elderly patients. Randomised, double blind (...) , cross over study. Four hospitals in Northern Ireland, one hospital in England, and two nursing homes in England. 77 elderly patients with a history of chronic constipation in long term hospital or nursing home care. A senna-fibre combination (10 ml daily) or lactulose (15 ml twice daily) with matching placebo for two 14 day periods, with 3-5 days before and between treatments. Stool frequency, stool consistency, and ease of evacuation; deviation from recommended dose; daily dose and cost per stool

BMJ1993 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro