Latest & greatest articles for constipation

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Top results for constipation

81. Opioid-induced constipation relief of fixed-ratio combination prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone compared with oxycodone and morphine for chronic non-malignant pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Opioid-induced constipation relief of fixed-ratio combination prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone compared with oxycodone and morphine for chronic non-malignant pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration

2017 PROSPERO

82. Moving along the management of constipation predominant IBS ? Is it worth the cost?

Moving along the management of constipation predominant IBS ? Is it worth the cost? Tools for Practice is proudly sponsored by the Alberta College of Family Physicians (ACFP). ACFP is a provincial, professional voluntary organization, representing more than 4,500 family physicians, family medicine residents, and medical students in Alberta. Established over sixty years ago, the ACFP strives for excellence in family practice through advocacy, continuing medical education and primary care (...) research. www.acfp.ca June 12, 2017 Moving along the management of constipation predominant IBS – Is it worth the cost? Clinical Question: What is the efficacy and safety of linaclotide in constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C)? Bottom Line: Compared to placebo, for every seven patients treated with linaclotide one more will be a “responder” [30% improvement in pain and one additional “complete” spontaneous bowel movement (CSBM) per week for six weeks in 12]. Overall, patients

2017 Tools for Practice

83. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) for treatment of constipation in children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) for treatment of constipation in children. Childhood constipation is a common problem with substantial health, economic and emotional burdens. Existing therapeutic options, mainly pharmacological, are not consistently effective, and some are associated with adverse effects after prolonged use. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES), a non-pharmacological approach, is postulated to facilitate bowel movement by modulating the nerves of the large (...) bowel via the application of electrical current transmitted through the abdominal wall.Our main objective was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of TES when employed to improve bowel function and constipation-related symptoms in children with constipation.We searched MEDLINE (PubMed) (1950 to July 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 7, 2015), EMBASE (1980 to July 2015), the Cochrane IBD Group Specialized Register, trial registries

2016 Cochrane

84. WITHDRAWN: Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) for treatment of constipation in children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

WITHDRAWN: Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) for treatment of constipation in children. Childhood constipation is a common problem with substantial health, economic and emotional burdens. Existing therapeutic options, mainly pharmacological, are not consistently effective, and some are associated with adverse effects after prolonged use. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES), a non-pharmacological approach, is postulated to facilitate bowel movement by modulating the nerves (...) of the large bowel via the application of electrical current transmitted through the abdominal wall.Our main objective was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of TES when employed to improve bowel function and constipation-related symptoms in children with constipation.We searched MEDLINE (PubMed) (1950 to July 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 7, 2015), EMBASE (1980 to July 2015), the Cochrane IBD Group Specialized Register, trial

2016 Cochrane

85. Prucalopride (Resolor) and chronic constipation in men

Prucalopride (Resolor) and chronic constipation in men Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''In the October issue of Prescrire International: Prucalopride (Resolor°) and chronic constipation in men'', 1 October 2016 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > In the October issue of Prescrire International: Prucalopride (Resolor°) and chronic constipation in men Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |    (...) |   |   |  Spotlight In the October issue of Prescrire International: Prucalopride (Resolor°) and chronic constipation in men FREE DOWNLOAD For men presenting with constipation, a troublesome but usually benign disorder, prucalopride carries a disproportionate risk of cardiovascular disorders, depression and suicidal ideation. As in women, it is better to optimise the use of standard laxatives, and to avoid prucalopride altogether. Full text available for free download. Summary

2016 Prescrire

86. Acupuncture for Chronic Severe Functional Constipation: A Randomized, Controlled Trial. (Abstract)

Acupuncture for Chronic Severe Functional Constipation: A Randomized, Controlled Trial. Acupuncture has been used for chronic constipation, but evidence for its effectiveness remains scarce.To determine the efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) for chronic severe functional constipation (CSFC).Randomized, parallel, sham-controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01726504).15 hospitals in China.Patients with CSFC and no serious underlying pathologic cause for constipation.28 sessions of EA

2016 Annals of Internal Medicine Controlled trial quality: predicted high

87. Osmotic and stimulant laxatives for the management of childhood constipation. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Osmotic and stimulant laxatives for the management of childhood constipation. Constipation within childhood is an extremely common problem. Despite the widespread use of osmotic and stimulant laxatives by health professionals to manage constipation in children, there has been a long standing paucity of high quality evidence to support this practice.We set out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of osmotic and stimulant laxatives used to treat functional childhood constipation.We searched (...) for childhood constipation. GRADE analyses indicated that the overall quality of the evidence for the primary outcome (number of stools per week) was low or very low due to sparse data, inconsistency (heterogeneity), and high risk of bias in the studies in the pooled analyses. Thus, the results of the pooled analyses should be interpreted with caution because of quality and methodological concerns, as well as clinical heterogeneity, and short follow-up. There is also evidence suggesting the efficacy

2016 Cochrane

88. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) for treatment of constipation in children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) for treatment of constipation in children. Childhood constipation is a common problem with substantial health, economic and emotional burdens. Existing therapeutic options, mainly pharmacological, are not consistently effective, and some are associated with adverse effects after prolonged use. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES), a non-pharmacological approach, is postulated to facilitate bowel movement by modulating the nerves of the large (...) bowel via the application of electrical current transmitted through the abdominal wall.Our main objective was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of TES when employed to improve bowel function and constipation-related symptoms in children with constipation.We searched MEDLINE (PubMed) (1950 to July 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 7, 2015), EMBASE (1980 to July 2015), the Cochrane IBD Group Specialized Register, trial registries

2016 Cochrane

89. Naldemedine for opioid-induced constipation in adults

Naldemedine for opioid-induced constipation in adults Naldemedine for opioid-induced constipation in adults Naldemedine for opioid-induced constipation in adults NIHR HSRIC Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation NIHR HSRIC. Naldemedine for opioid-induced constipation in adults. Birmingham: NIHR Horizon Scanning Research&Intelligence Centre. Horizon (...) Scanning Review. 2016 Authors' conclusions Opioids are a class of drugs that are commonly prescribed for pain. Constipation is a side effect that affects nearly all patients taking opioid treatment. There has been an increase in the use of opioids to treat chronic pain in recent years. Current treatment for opioid-induced constipation often involves laxatives. But, it has been estimated that 50–80% of people taking laxatives for opioid-induced constipation get only a limited improvement in symptoms

2016 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

90. Comparison of efficacy of pharmacological treatments for chronic idiopathic constipation: a systematic review and network meta-analysis Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comparison of efficacy of pharmacological treatments for chronic idiopathic constipation: a systematic review and network meta-analysis To compare efficacy of pharmacotherapies for chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) based on comparisons to placebo using Bayesian network meta-analysis.We conducted searches (inception to May 2015) of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and Cochrane Central, as well as original data from authors or drug companies for the medications used for CIC.Phase IIB and phase III (...) randomised, placebo-controlled trials (RCT) of ≥4 weeks' treatment for CIC in adults with Rome II or III criteria for functional constipation; trials included at least one of four end points.Two investigators independently evaluated all full-text articles that met inclusion criteria and extracted data for primary and secondary end points, risk of bias and quality of evidence.Primary end points were ≥3 complete spontaneous bowel movements (CSBM)/week and increase over baseline by ≥1 CSBM/week. Secondary

2016 EvidenceUpdates

91. Linaclotide for Constipation: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness

Linaclotide for Constipation: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Linaclotide for Constipation: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Linaclotide for Constipation: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Linaclotide for Constipation: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Published on: June 21, 2016 Project Number: RA0852-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Reference List Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of linaclotide (...) for the treatment of patients with chronic idiopathic constipation? What is the clinical effectiveness of linaclotide for the treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation? What is the cost-effectiveness of linaclotide for the treatment of patients with chronic idiopathic constipation What is the cost-effectiveness of linaclotide for the treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation? Key Message Eight systematic reviews, three randomized controlled trials, six non

2016 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

92. Prucalopride (Resolor) - chronic constipation in men

Prucalopride (Resolor) - chronic constipation in men Final Appraisal Recommendation Advice No: 0816 – March 2016 Prucalopride (Resolor ® ) 1 mg and 2 mg film-coated tablets Limited submission by Shire Pharmaceutical Contracts Ltd Additional note(s): • Please refer to the recommended NICE Technology Appraisal 211 for prucalopride use in women. • Please refer to the Summary of Product Characteristics for the full licensed indication. In reaching the above recommendation AWMSG has taken account (...) . Statement of use: No part of this recommendation may be reproduced without the whole recommendation being quoted in full and cited as: All Wales Medicines Strategy Group. Final Appraisal Recommendation – 0816: Prucalopride (Resolor ® ) 1 mg and 2 mg film-coated tablets. March 2016. Recommendation of AWMSG Prucalopride (Resolor ® ) is recommended as an option for use within NHS Wales for the treatment of chronic constipation in men in whom laxatives fail to provide adequate relief.

2016 All Wales Medicines Strategy Group

93. Easing the strain: put your feet up for constipation

Easing the strain: put your feet up for constipation Easing the strain: put your feet up for constipation - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By February 24, 2016 // In this guest blog, pelvic physiotherapist and comedian Elaine Miller tells us what we need to know to avoid constipation and when the going gets tough. This is the third blog in our new series Evidence for Everyday Health Choices. Constipation is a miserable condition which can worsen co-morbidities like low back pain, muscle (...) can cause constipation, particularly in children – it’s best to move your bowels when you feel the first urge. Poo position You can help reduce the stress on the tissues and reduce straining by squatting to pass a bowel movement. This position encourages the pelvic floor to relax. This can be mimicked on a Western style toilet by raising the feet on a low stool. A stool stool, if you will. Sitting with hips at 90 degrees means the puborectalis muscle is not relaxed, which means the kink

2016 Evidently Cochrane

94. Efficacy and safety of laxatives for chronic constipation in long-term care settings: a systematic review protocol

Efficacy and safety of laxatives for chronic constipation in long-term care settings: a systematic review protocol Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence

2016 PROSPERO

95. Constipation

Constipation Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines - Constipation Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines search / / / Constipation Constipation Introduction Constipation is the passage of small, hard faeces infrequently or with difficulty, and less often than is normal for that individual. Constipation can cause unpleasant symptoms such as abdominal and rectal pain, distension, and other negative effects on the patient’s wellbeing. As well as the physical suffering, constipation can cause (...) psychological distress and agitation in the terminally ill patient. There are many reasons why palliative care patients may develop constipation and these are discussed below. Constipation can be complex and may require specialist advice if the current treatment regime is not successful. Assessment A full assessment of the patient and their symptoms should be obtained looking at: normal and current bowel pattern (frequency, consistency, ease of passage, blood present, pain on passing stool) current

2016 Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines

96. Constipation in older adults: Stepwise approach to keep things moving

Constipation in older adults: Stepwise approach to keep things moving Constipation in older adults | The College of Family Physicians of Canada Main menu User menu Search Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Research Article Practice Constipation in older adults Stepwise approach to keep things moving Brenda G. Schuster , Lynette Kosar and Rejina Kamrul Canadian Family Physician February 2015, 61 (2) 152-158; Brenda G. Schuster Clinical Pharmacist in the Academic Family Medicine Unit (...) , Regina Division, at the University of Saskatchewan, and Academic Detailer for the RxFiles Academic Detailing Program. Lynette Kosar Clinical Pharmacist for the RxFiles Academic Detailing Program. Rejina Kamrul Assistant Professor in the Academic Family Medicine Unit, Regina Division. Constipation is a common complaint and challenge for older adults. The prevalence of constipation increases with age and differs among settings. In individuals 65 years of age or older in the community, the prevalence

2016 RxFiles

97. MACE vs cecostomy in children with intractable constipation

MACE vs cecostomy in children with intractable constipation Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures Timing

2016 PROSPERO

98. Systematic review using GRADE evaluating the evidence of using opioid receptor antagonists and PAMORAs in the treatment of opioid induced constipation

Systematic review using GRADE evaluating the evidence of using opioid receptor antagonists and PAMORAs in the treatment of opioid induced constipation Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith

2016 PROSPERO

99. Effective nursing interventions in the resolution of constipation in adults

Effective nursing interventions in the resolution of constipation in adults Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect

2016 PROSPERO

100. Lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary tract infections in children with functional constipation: a systematic review

Lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary tract infections in children with functional constipation: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence

2016 PROSPERO