Latest & greatest articles for constipation

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Top results for constipation

21. Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus Lcr35 in the Management of Functional Constipation in Children: A Randomized Trial

Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus Lcr35 in the Management of Functional Constipation in Children: A Randomized Trial 28284477 2017 03 12 2017 04 24 1097-6833 184 2017 May The Journal of pediatrics J. Pediatr. Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus Lcr35 in the Management of Functional Constipation in Children: A Randomized Trial. 101-105.e1 S0022-3476(17)30178-6 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.01.068 To assess the effectiveness of Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus Lcr35 (Lcr35) in the management of functional constipation (...) in children. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 94 children aged <5 years with functional constipation according to the Rome III criteria. Children were assigned to receive Lcr35 (8 × 10(8) colony-forming units, n = 48) or placebo (n = 46), twice daily, for 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was treatment success, defined as 3 or more spontaneous stools per week, without episodes of fecal soiling, in the last week of the intervention. Analyses were by intention

EvidenceUpdates2017

23. Plecanatide (Trulance) - Chronic Idiopathic Constipation (CIC)

Plecanatide (Trulance) - Chronic Idiopathic Constipation (CIC) Trulance (plecanatide) Tablets U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Search FDA Submit search Trulance (plecanatide) Tablets Trulance Company: Synergy Pharmaceuticals Inc. Application No.: 208745 Approval Date: 01/19/2017 Persons with disabilities having problems accessing the PDF files below may call (301) 796-3634 for assistance. (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) Date

FDA - Drug Approval Package2017

24. Effectiveness of Pelvic Physiotherapy in Children With Functional Constipation Compared With Standard Medical Care

Effectiveness of Pelvic Physiotherapy in Children With Functional Constipation Compared With Standard Medical Care 27650174 2016 09 21 2016 12 18 1528-0012 152 1 2017 Jan Gastroenterology Gastroenterology Effectiveness of Pelvic Physiotherapy in Children With Functional Constipation Compared With Standard Medical Care. 82-91 S0016-5085(16)35086-7 10.1053/j.gastro.2016.09.015 Functional constipation (FC) is a common childhood problem often related to pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. We compared

EvidenceUpdates2017

27. Palliative care - constipation

Palliative care - constipation Palliative care - constipation - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - constipation: Summary Constipation is defecation that is unsatisfactory because of infrequent stools, difficult stool passage, or seemingly incomplete defecation. Stools are often dry and hard, and may be abnormally large or abnormally small. About 80% of people with cancer will require treatment with laxatives at some time. People receiving palliative care have multiple (...) causes of constipation, such as: Drugs, for example, opioid analgesics, antimuscarinic drugs, antacids. Secondary effects of disease, for example, dehydration, inadequate dietary fibre, inactivity, delirium, spinal cord compression, lack of privacy. Direct effects of malignant tumours, causing bowel obstruction, hypercalcaemia, nerve damage. When assessing a person with constipation in palliative care: The history should include information about the frequency and character of stools, discomfort

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2017

28. Moving along the management of constipation predominant IBS ? Is it worth the cost?

Moving along the management of constipation predominant IBS ? Is it worth the cost? Tools for Practice is proudly sponsored by the Alberta College of Family Physicians (ACFP). ACFP is a provincial, professional voluntary organization, representing more than 4,500 family physicians, family medicine residents, and medical students in Alberta. Established over sixty years ago, the ACFP strives for excellence in family practice through advocacy, continuing medical education and primary (...) care research. www.acfp.ca June 12, 2017 Moving along the management of constipation predominant IBS – Is it worth the cost? Clinical Question: What is the efficacy and safety of linaclotide in constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C)? Bottom Line: Compared to placebo, for every seven patients treated with linaclotide one more will be a “responder” [30% improvement in pain and one additional “complete” spontaneous bowel movement (CSBM) per week for six weeks in 12]. Overall, patients

Tools for Practice2017

29. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) for treatment of constipation in children.

Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) for treatment of constipation in children. BACKGROUND: Childhood constipation is a common problem with substantial health, economic and emotional burdens. Existing therapeutic options, mainly pharmacological, are not consistently effective, and some are associated with adverse effects after prolonged use. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES), a non-pharmacological approach, is postulated to facilitate bowel movement by modulating the nerves (...) of the large bowel via the application of electrical current transmitted through the abdominal wall. OBJECTIVES: Our main objective was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of TES when employed to improve bowel function and constipation-related symptoms in children with constipation. SEARCH METHODS: We searched MEDLINE (PubMed) (1950 to July 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 7, 2015), EMBASE (1980 to July 2015), the Cochrane IBD Group

Cochrane2016

30. WITHDRAWN: Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) for treatment of constipation in children.

WITHDRAWN: Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) for treatment of constipation in children. BACKGROUND: Childhood constipation is a common problem with substantial health, economic and emotional burdens. Existing therapeutic options, mainly pharmacological, are not consistently effective, and some are associated with adverse effects after prolonged use. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES), a non-pharmacological approach, is postulated to facilitate bowel movement by modulating (...) the nerves of the large bowel via the application of electrical current transmitted through the abdominal wall. OBJECTIVES: Our main objective was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of TES when employed to improve bowel function and constipation-related symptoms in children with constipation. SEARCH METHODS: We searched MEDLINE (PubMed) (1950 to July 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 7, 2015), EMBASE (1980 to July 2015), the Cochrane

Cochrane2016

31. Prucalopride (Resolor) and chronic constipation in men

Prucalopride (Resolor) and chronic constipation in men Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''In the October issue of Prescrire International: Prucalopride (Resolor°) and chronic constipation in men'', 1 October 2016 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > In the October issue of Prescrire International: Prucalopride (Resolor°) and chronic constipation in men Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |    (...) |   |   |  Spotlight In the October issue of Prescrire International: Prucalopride (Resolor°) and chronic constipation in men FREE DOWNLOAD For men presenting with constipation, a troublesome but usually benign disorder, prucalopride carries a disproportionate risk of cardiovascular disorders, depression and suicidal ideation. As in women, it is better to optimise the use of standard laxatives, and to avoid prucalopride altogether. Full text available for free download. Summary

Prescrire2016

32. Acupuncture for Chronic Severe Functional Constipation: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

Acupuncture for Chronic Severe Functional Constipation: A Randomized, Controlled Trial. Background: Acupuncture has been used for chronic constipation, but evidence for its effectiveness remains scarce. Objective: To determine the efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) for chronic severe functional constipation (CSFC). Design: Randomized, parallel, sham-controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01726504 ). Setting: 15 hospitals in China. Participants: Patients with CSFC and no serious underlying (...) pathologic cause for constipation. Intervention: 28 sessions of EA at traditional acupoints or sham EA (SA) at nonacupoints over 8 weeks. Measurements: The primary outcome was the change from baseline in mean weekly complete spontaneous bowel movements (CSBMs) during weeks 1 to 8. Participants were followed until week 20. Results: 1075 patients (536 and 539 in the EA and SA groups, respectively) were enrolled. The increase from baseline in mean weekly CSBMs during weeks 1 to 8 was 1.76 (95% CI, 1.61

Annals of Internal Medicine2016

33. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) for treatment of constipation in children.

Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) for treatment of constipation in children. BACKGROUND: Childhood constipation is a common problem with substantial health, economic and emotional burdens. Existing therapeutic options, mainly pharmacological, are not consistently effective, and some are associated with adverse effects after prolonged use. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES), a non-pharmacological approach, is postulated to facilitate bowel movement by modulating the nerves (...) of the large bowel via the application of electrical current transmitted through the abdominal wall. OBJECTIVES: Our main objective was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of TES when employed to improve bowel function and constipation-related symptoms in children with constipation. SEARCH METHODS: We searched MEDLINE (PubMed) (1950 to July 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 7, 2015), EMBASE (1980 to July 2015), the Cochrane IBD Group

Cochrane2016

34. Naldemedine for opioid-induced constipation in adults

Naldemedine for opioid-induced constipation in adults Naldemedine for opioid-induced constipation in adults Naldemedine for opioid-induced constipation in adults NIHR HSRIC Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation NIHR HSRIC. Naldemedine for opioid-induced constipation in adults. Birmingham: NIHR Horizon Scanning Research&Intelligence Centre. Horizon (...) Scanning Review. 2016 Authors' conclusions Opioids are a class of drugs that are commonly prescribed for pain. Constipation is a side effect that affects nearly all patients taking opioid treatment. There has been an increase in the use of opioids to treat chronic pain in recent years. Current treatment for opioid-induced constipation often involves laxatives. But, it has been estimated that 50–80% of people taking laxatives for opioid-induced constipation get only a limited improvement in symptoms

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2016

35. Linaclotide for Constipation: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness

Linaclotide for Constipation: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Linaclotide for Constipation: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Linaclotide for Constipation: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Linaclotide for Constipation: Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Published on: June 21, 2016 Project Number: RA0852-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Reference List Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of linaclotide (...) for the treatment of patients with chronic idiopathic constipation? What is the clinical effectiveness of linaclotide for the treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation? What is the cost-effectiveness of linaclotide for the treatment of patients with chronic idiopathic constipation What is the cost-effectiveness of linaclotide for the treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation? Key Message Eight systematic reviews, three randomized controlled trials, six non

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review2016

36. Prucalopride (Resolor) - chronic constipation in men

Prucalopride (Resolor) - chronic constipation in men Final Appraisal Recommendation Advice No: 0816 – March 2016 Prucalopride (Resolor ® ) 1 mg and 2 mg film-coated tablets Limited submission by Shire Pharmaceutical Contracts Ltd Additional note(s): • Please refer to the recommended NICE Technology Appraisal 211 for prucalopride use in women. • Please refer to the Summary of Product Characteristics for the full licensed indication. In reaching the above recommendation AWMSG has taken account (...) . Statement of use: No part of this recommendation may be reproduced without the whole recommendation being quoted in full and cited as: All Wales Medicines Strategy Group. Final Appraisal Recommendation – 0816: Prucalopride (Resolor ® ) 1 mg and 2 mg film-coated tablets. March 2016. Recommendation of AWMSG Prucalopride (Resolor ® ) is recommended as an option for use within NHS Wales for the treatment of chronic constipation in men in whom laxatives fail to provide adequate relief.

All Wales Medicines Strategy Group2016

37. Easing the strain: put your feet up for constipation

Easing the strain: put your feet up for constipation Easing the strain: put your feet up for constipation - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By February 24, 2016 // In this guest blog, pelvic physiotherapist and comedian Elaine Miller tells us what we need to know to avoid constipation and when the going gets tough. This is the third blog in our new series Evidence for Everyday Health Choices. Constipation is a miserable condition which can worsen co-morbidities like low back pain, muscle (...) can cause constipation, particularly in children – it’s best to move your bowels when you feel the first urge. Poo position You can help reduce the stress on the tissues and reduce straining by squatting to pass a bowel movement. This position encourages the pelvic floor to relax. This can be mimicked on a Western style toilet by raising the feet on a low stool. A stool stool, if you will. Sitting with hips at 90 degrees means the puborectalis muscle is not relaxed, which means the kink

Evidently Cochrane2016

38. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Evaluation and Management of Constipation

Clinical Practice Guideline for the Evaluation and Management of Constipation Copyright © The American Society of Colon & Rectal Surgeons, Inc. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. 479 Diseases of the Colon & ReCtum Volume 59: 6 (2016) t he a merican s ociety of Colon and Rectal surgeons is dedicated to assuring high-quality patient care by advancing the science, prevention, and manage- ment of disorders and diseases of the colon, rectum, and anus. t he Clinical Practice (...) - ment regarding the propriety of any specific procedure must be made by the physician in light of all of the cir- cumstances presented by the individual patient. STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM Constipation is a benign condition that can have a signifi- cant impact on quality of life. t he prevalence has been es- timated to be as high as 30% in select populations and has been noted to be higher in women, nonwhites, those aged >65 years, and those with lower socioeconomic status. 1–6 Constipation

American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons2016

39. Prevention of Constipation in the Older Adult Population

Prevention of Constipation in the Older Adult Population Prevention of Constipation in the Older Adult Population | Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario l’Association des infirmières et infirmiers autorisés de l’Ontario Speaking out for nursing. Speaking out for health. » » Prevention of Constipation in the Older Adult Population Project / Initiative: Type of Guideline: Clinical Status: Published Publish Date: 2005 About this Guideline : The purpose of this guideline is to reduce (...) the frequency and severity of constipation among older adults through the use of adequate hydration and dietary fibre, regular consistent toileting and physical activity. Achieving and maintaining a pattern of normal bowel elimination will prevent constipation, decrease the use of laxatives, and improve the quality of life for older adults. This guideline has relevance in all areas of clinical practice, including acute care, community care and long-term care. However, the recommendations should

Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario2016

40. Constipation in older adults: Stepwise approach to keep things moving

Constipation in older adults: Stepwise approach to keep things moving Constipation in older adults | The College of Family Physicians of Canada Main menu User menu Search Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Research Article Practice Constipation in older adults Stepwise approach to keep things moving Brenda G. Schuster , Lynette Kosar and Rejina Kamrul Canadian Family Physician February 2015, 61 (2) 152-158; Brenda G. Schuster Clinical Pharmacist in the Academic Family Medicine Unit (...) , Regina Division, at the University of Saskatchewan, and Academic Detailer for the RxFiles Academic Detailing Program. Lynette Kosar Clinical Pharmacist for the RxFiles Academic Detailing Program. Rejina Kamrul Assistant Professor in the Academic Family Medicine Unit, Regina Division. Constipation is a common complaint and challenge for older adults. The prevalence of constipation increases with age and differs among settings. In individuals 65 years of age or older in the community, the prevalence

RxFiles2016