Latest & greatest articles for colorectal cancer

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Top results for colorectal cancer

821. Cost-effectiveness of a single colonoscopy in screening for colorectal cancer

Cost-effectiveness of a single colonoscopy in screening for colorectal cancer Cost-effectiveness of a single colonoscopy in screening for colorectal cancer Cost-effectiveness of a single colonoscopy in screening for colorectal cancer Sonnenberg A, Delco F Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment (...) on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The use of single or repeated colonoscopy for the screening of colorectal cancer (CRC). Single colonoscopy was performed at 65 years of age, while repeated colonoscopy was performed every 10 years starting at the age of 50. Type of intervention Screening. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population The study population was the general population in the USA. Setting The setting was the community. The economic study

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2002

822. Costs and consequences of different chemotherapy regimens in metastatic colorectal cancer

Costs and consequences of different chemotherapy regimens in metastatic colorectal cancer Costs and consequences of different chemotherapy regimens in metastatic colorectal cancer Costs and consequences of different chemotherapy regimens in metastatic colorectal cancer Hale J P, Cohen D R, Maughan T S, Stephens R J Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods (...) , the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The study involved patients with advanced colorectal cancer who were given one of the three following chemotherapy treatments. 1. De Gramont regimen, i.e. dl-folinic acid 100 mg/m2 (in the effectiveness study this is given as 200 mg/m2), 5-fluorouracil (5FU) bolus 400 mg/m2 and infusion 600 mg/m2 day 1 and 2, ql4d. 2. Lokich regimen, i.e. a protracted venous

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2002

823. Screening for colorectal cancer in adults

Screening for colorectal cancer in adults Screening for colorectal cancer in adults Screening for colorectal cancer in adults Pignone M P, Rich M, Teutsch S, Berg A, Lohr K Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Pignone M P, Rich M, Teutsch S, Berg A, Lohr K. Screening for colorectal cancer in adults. Rockville: Agency (...) for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Preventive Services Task Force Systematic Evidence Review No. 7. 2002 Authors' objectives This review aims to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different colorectal cancer screening tests. Authors' conclusions Colorectal cancer screening is effective in reducing mortality from colorectal cancer. Current data are insufficient to determine the most effective or cost-effective strategy for screening, although all major strategies have favorable cost

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2002

824. Screening for colorectal cancer

Screening for colorectal cancer Screening for colorectal cancer We use cookies on this website. By using this site, you agree that we may store and access cookies on your device. Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services Screening for colorectal cancer Share: Reading time approx. 6 minutes This document was published more than 2 years ago. The nature of the evidence may have changed. Findings by SBU Alert This is a translation of version 1, published (...) on April 11, 2000. The latest version of this report is not available in English. Cancer of the colon and rectum is third most common cause of death from cancer. Each year, approximately 2 500 people in Sweden die because of the disease. The risk of being affected is the same in men and women and increases with age. One way to reduce morbidity and mortality is to detect cancer at an early stage where surgical intervention has good results. General screening in the population can be conducted

Swedish Council on Technology Assessement2002

825. Colorectal Cancer: Screening

Colorectal Cancer: Screening Screening: Colorectal Cancer U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Screening for Colorectal Cancer Release Date: July 2002 / Summary of Recommendations The USPSTF strongly recommends that clinicians screen men and women 50 years of age or older for colorectal cancer. Rating: . Rationale : The USPSTF found fair to good evidence that several screening methods are effective in reducing mortality from colorectal cancer. The USPSTF concluded that the benefits from (...) screening substantially outweigh potential harms, but the quality of evidence, magnitude of benefit, and potential harms vary with each method. The USPSTF found good evidence that periodic fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) reduces mortality from colorectal cancer and fair evidence that sigmoidoscopy alone or in combination with FOBT reduces mortality. The USPSTF did not find direct evidence that screening colonoscopy is effective in reducing colorectal cancer mortality; efficacy of colonoscopy

Publication 3262002

826. Single flexible sigmoidoscopy screening to prevent colorectal cancer: baseline findings of a UK multicentre randomised trial.

Single flexible sigmoidoscopy screening to prevent colorectal cancer: baseline findings of a UK multicentre randomised trial. 11965274 2002 04 19 2002 04 30 2016 11 24 0140-6736 359 9314 2002 Apr 13 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Single flexible sigmoidoscopy screening to prevent colorectal cancer: baseline findings of a UK multicentre randomised trial. 1291-300 This randomised controlled trial is examining the hypothesis that a single flexible sigmoidoscopy screening offered at around age 60 (...) years can lower the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer. We report here on acceptability, safety, feasibility, and yield. Men and women aged 55-64 years, in 14 UK centres, who responded to a mailed questionnaire that they would attend for flexible sigmoidoscopy screening if invited, were randomly assigned screening or control (ratio one to two). The control group was not contacted. Small polyps were removed during screening, and colonoscopy was undertaken if high-risk polyps (three or more

Lancet2002

827. Comparison of survival, palliation, and quality of life with three chemotherapy regimens in metastatic colorectal cancer: a multicentre randomised trial.

Comparison of survival, palliation, and quality of life with three chemotherapy regimens in metastatic colorectal cancer: a multicentre randomised trial. 12047964 2002 06 05 2002 07 12 2015 11 19 0140-6736 359 9317 2002 May 04 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Comparison of survival, palliation, and quality of life with three chemotherapy regimens in metastatic colorectal cancer: a multicentre randomised trial. 1555-63 This randomised trial compared three chemotherapy regimens in the first-line (...) treatment of advanced colorectal cancer, in terms of their effect on overall and progression-free survival; other endpoints included toxicity, symptom palliation, and quality of life. 905 patients were randomly assigned the de Gramont regimen (n=303; folinic acid 200 mg/m(2), fluorouracil bolus 400 mg/m(2), and infusion 600 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 2, repeated every 14 days), the Lokich regimen (n=301; protracted venous infusion of fluorouracil 300 mg/m(2) daily), or raltitrexed (n=301; 3 mg/m(2

Lancet2002

828. Follow-up strategies for patients treated for non-metastatic colorectal cancer.

Follow-up strategies for patients treated for non-metastatic colorectal cancer. BACKGROUND: It is common clinical practise to follow patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) for several years following their definitive surgery and/or adjuvant therapy. Despite this widespread practice there is considerable controversy about how often patients should be seen, what tests should be performed and whether these varying strategies have any significant impact on patient outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To review (...) the available evidence concerning the benefits of intensive follow-up of colorectal cancer patients with respect to survival. Secondary endpoints include time to diagnosis of recurrence, quality of life and the harms and costs of surveillance and investigations. SEARCH STRATEGY: Relevant trials were identified by electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CANCERLIT, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Science Citation Index, conference proceedings, trial registers, reference lists and contact

Cochrane2002

829. Aspirin as an adjunct to screening for prevention of sporadic colorectal cancer. A cost-effectiveness analysis.

Aspirin as an adjunct to screening for prevention of sporadic colorectal cancer. A cost-effectiveness analysis. BACKGROUND: Aspirin may decrease colorectal cancer incidence, but its role as an adjunct to or substitute for screening has not been evaluated. OBJECTIVE: To examine the potential cost-effectiveness of aspirin chemoprophylaxis in relation to screening. DESIGN: Markov model. DATA SOURCES: Literature on colorectal cancer epidemiology, screening, costs, and aspirin chemoprevention (1980 (...) -1999). TARGET POPULATION: General U.S. population. TIME HORIZON: 50 to 80 years of age. PERSPECTIVE: Third-party payer. INTERVENTION: Aspirin therapy in patients screened with sigmoidoscopy every 5 years and fecal occult blood testing every year (FS/FOBT) or colonoscopy every 10 years (COLO). OUTCOME MEASURES: Discounted cost per life-year gained. RESULTS OF BASE-CASE ANALYSIS: When a 30% reduction in colorectal cancer risk was assumed, aspirin increased costs and decreased life-years because

Annals of Internal Medicine2001

830. Bethesda guidelines: relation to microsatellite instability and MLH1 promoter methylation in patients with colorectal cancer.

Bethesda guidelines: relation to microsatellite instability and MLH1 promoter methylation in patients with colorectal cancer. BACKGROUND: Microsatellite instability is a hallmark of mismatch repair deficiency in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer and results from mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1 or MSH2 or from gene inactivation associated with DNA methylation. The Bethesda guidelines were established to identify patients with colorectal cancer who should be tested (...) for microsatellite instability. OBJECTIVE: To assess the Bethesda guidelines for detection of microsatellite instability and to determine the role of MLH1 promoter methylation in colorectal cancer. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Tertiary care referral center in Frankfurt, Germany. PATIENTS: 125 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer. MEASUREMENTS: Patients were assessed according to the Bethesda guidelines, and tumor specimens were analyzed for microsatellite instability. Patients

Annals of Internal Medicine2001

831. Cost-effectiveness of microsatellite instability screening as a method for detecting hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

Cost-effectiveness of microsatellite instability screening as a method for detecting hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. BACKGROUND: The National Cancer Institute has published consensus guidelines for universal screening for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) in patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer. OBJECTIVE: To determine the cost-effectiveness of screening compared with standard care in eligible patients with colorectal cancer and their siblings and children (...) . DESIGN: Cost-effectiveness analysis. DATA SOURCES: National colorectal cancer registry data, the Creighton International Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Registry, Medicare claims records, and published literature. TARGET POPULATION: Patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer and their siblings and children. TIME HORIZON: Lifetime (varies depending on age at screening). PERSPECTIVE: Societal. INTERVENTIONS: Initial office-based screening to determine eligibility (based on personal and family cancer

Annals of Internal Medicine2001

832. One-time screening for colorectal cancer with combined fecal occult-blood testing and examination of the distal colon.

One-time screening for colorectal cancer with combined fecal occult-blood testing and examination of the distal colon. BACKGROUND: Fecal occult-blood testing and sigmoidoscopy have been recommended for screening for colorectal cancer, but the sensitivity of such combined testing for detecting neoplasia is uncertain. At 13 Veterans Affairs medical centers, we performed colonoscopy to determine the prevalence of neoplasia and the sensitivity of one-time screening with a fecal occult-blood test (...) plus sigmoidoscopy. METHODS: Asymptomatic subjects (age range, 50 to 75 years) provided stool specimens on cards from three consecutive days for fecal occult-blood testing, which were rehydrated for interpretation. They then underwent colonoscopy. Sigmoidoscopy was defined in this study as examination of the rectum and sigmoid colon during colonoscopy, and sensitivity was estimated by determining how many patients with advanced neoplasia had an adenoma in the rectum or sigmoid colon. Advanced

NEJM2001

833. A rapid and systematic review of the evidence for the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of irinotecan, oxaliplatin and raltitrexed for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer

A rapid and systematic review of the evidence for the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of irinotecan, oxaliplatin and raltitrexed for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer A rapid and systematic review of the evidence for the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of irinotecan, oxaliplatin and raltitrexed for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer A rapid and systematic review of the evidence for the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of irinotecan (...) , oxaliplatin and raltitrexed for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer Lloyd Jones M, Hummel S, Bansback N, Orr B, Seymour M Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Lloyd Jones M, Hummel S, Bansback N, Orr B, Seymour M. A rapid and systematic review of the evidence for the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of irinotecan

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2001

834. PET scans for solitary pulmonary nodules, non-small cell lung cancer, recurrent colorectal cancer, lymphoma, and recurrent melanoma

PET scans for solitary pulmonary nodules, non-small cell lung cancer, recurrent colorectal cancer, lymphoma, and recurrent melanoma PET scans for solitary pulmonary nodules, non-small cell lung cancer, recurrent colorectal cancer, lymphoma, and recurrent melanoma PET scans for solitary pulmonary nodules, non-small cell lung cancer, recurrent colorectal cancer, lymphoma, and recurrent melanoma Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published (...) health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. PET scans for solitary pulmonary nodules, non-small cell lung cancer, recurrent colorectal cancer, lymphoma, and recurrent melanoma. Bloomington MN: Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement (ICSI) 2001 Authors' objectives This review aims to assess the available evidence on the effectiveness of PET scans for solitary pulmonary nodules

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2001

835. Screening strategies for colorectal cancer: systematic review and recommendations

Screening strategies for colorectal cancer: systematic review and recommendations Screening strategies for colorectal cancer: systematic review and recommendations Screening strategies for colorectal cancer: systematic review and recommendations McLeod R, with the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation (...) McLeod R, with the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Screening strategies for colorectal cancer: systematic review and recommendations. London, Ontario: Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (CTFPHC) 2001: 35 Authors' objectives The aims of this report were to make recommendations on the effectiveness of specific screening techniques for colorectal cancer in asymptomatic patients. Effectiveness in normal risk patients was reviewed for: 1) multiphase screening with the Hemoccult

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2001

836. Use of irinotecan (Camptosar, CPT-11) combined with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (5FU/LV) as first-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

Use of irinotecan (Camptosar, CPT-11) combined with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (5FU/LV) as first-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer Use of irinotecan (Camptosar, CPT-11) combined with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (5FU/LV) as first-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer Use of irinotecan (Camptosar, CPT-11) combined with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (5FU/LV) as first-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer Gastrointestinal Cancer Disease Site Group CRD summary (...) irinotecan to first-line therapy with 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin (5FU-LV) improves survival, time to disease progression, or quality of life in people with metastatic colorectal cancer. Searching MEDLINE (1976 to January 2003), Cancerlit (1983 to October 2002), the Cochrane Library (Issue 4, 2002), PDQ, the proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (to 2002), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration website, and reference lists from retrieved papers were searched; the search terms were

DARE.2001

837. Screening strategies for colorectal cancer: a systematic review of the evidence

Screening strategies for colorectal cancer: a systematic review of the evidence Screening strategies for colorectal cancer: a systematic review of the evidence Screening strategies for colorectal cancer: a systematic review of the evidence McLeod R S, Canadian Task Force on Preventive Care Authors' objectives The authors assessed the effectiveness of different screening techniques for colorectal cancer (CRC) in asymptomatic people at normal or an above average risk. Searching MEDLINE (...) for people with familial adenomatous polyposis; colonoscopy for people at risk of hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer; or colonoscopy for people with immediate family history of polyps or CRC. Reference standard test against which the new test was compared The authors did not define a 'gold' standard comparator as an inclusion criterion. Some studies included in the review used colonoscopy as the gold standard comparator. Others used clinical follow-up to assess mortality and faecal occult blood testing

DARE.2001

838. An individual patient data meta-analysis of long supported adjuvant chemotherapy with oral carmofur in patients with curatively resected colorectal cancer

An individual patient data meta-analysis of long supported adjuvant chemotherapy with oral carmofur in patients with curatively resected colorectal cancer An individual patient data meta-analysis of long supported adjuvant chemotherapy with oral carmofur in patients with curatively resected colorectal cancer An individual patient data meta-analysis of long supported adjuvant chemotherapy with oral carmofur in patients with curatively resected colorectal cancer Sakamoto J, Kodaira S, Hamada C (...) , Ito K, Maehara Y, Takagi H, Sugimachi K, Nakazato H, Ohashi Y Authors' objectives To assess the effect of adjuvant chemotherapy with oral carmofur on survival and disease-free survival in people with curatively resected colorectal cancer. Searching MEDLINE, the PDQ database and conference abstracts were searched; the search terms and search dates were not reported. The authors also approached personal contacts for additional studies. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included

DARE.2001

839. Oral contraceptives and colorectal cancer risk: a meta-analysis

Oral contraceptives and colorectal cancer risk: a meta-analysis Oral contraceptives and colorectal cancer risk: a meta-analysis Oral contraceptives and colorectal cancer risk: a meta-analysis Fernandez E, La Vecchia C, Balducci A, Chatenoud L, Franceschi S, Negri E Authors' objectives To investigate the association between oral contraceptive (OC) use and the risk of colorectal cancer. Searching MEDLINE and Cancerlit were searched for papers published up to June 2000. The search strategy (...) employed synonyms of the following: 'neoplasms', 'tumours', or 'cancer of colon and/or rectum'; 'exogenous female hormones', 'oral contraceptives' or 'oestro-progestins'. The authors also reviewed reference lists in relevant papers, and contacted colleagues to update the papers included in the IARC Monograph (see Other Publications of Related Interest no.1) and a previous review (see Other Publications of Related Interest no.2). Only full papers published in the English language were considered

DARE.2001

840. Alpha-interferon does not increase the efficacy of 5-fluorouracil in advanced colorectal cancer

Alpha-interferon does not increase the efficacy of 5-fluorouracil in advanced colorectal cancer Alpha-interferon does not increase the efficacy of 5-fluorouracil in advanced colorectal cancer Alpha-interferon does not increase the efficacy of 5-fluorouracil in advanced colorectal cancer Thirion P, Piedbois P, Buyse M, O'Dwyer P J, Cunningham D, Man A, Greco F A, Colucci G, Kohne C H, Di Costanzo F, Piga A, Palmeri S, Dufour P, Cassano A, Pajkos G, Pensel R, Aykan N F, Marsh J, Seymour M T (...) Authors' objectives To investigate the impact of alpha-interferon (alpha-IFN) in advanced colorectal cancer, through a meta-analytic approach based on individual patient data (IPD). Searching The search for relevant trials was initiated in October 1996. The trials were identified by searching MEDLINE, PDQ, and the proceedings of major conferences since 1989, and by contacting principal investigators. A secretariat and collaborative group of trial investigators (Meta-Analysis Group in Cancer

DARE.2001