Latest & greatest articles for colorectal cancer

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on colorectal cancer and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for colorectal cancer

1. Dental radiograph as an opportunistic screening tool for a colorectal cancer syndrome (CAT#3342)

Dental radiograph as an opportunistic screening tool for a colorectal cancer syndrome (CAT#3342) UTCAT3342, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Dental radiograph as an opportunistic screening tool for a colorectal cancer syndrome Clinical Question Does dental radiograph serve as an opportunistic screening tool for early detection of extraintestinal manifestations of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP (...) ) in children and adults? Clinical Bottom Line Incidental findings on dental radiographs could serve as screening tools for systemic diseases and syndromes. The attention should be raised when gene mutation, congenitally diseases or familial colorectal cancer are reported by patients during the medical history questionnaire. For patients with risk of FAP, the Dental panoramic radiographic score (DPRS) is inexpensive, and reinforce the referral for the further clinical investigation, gene mapping

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2018

3. Efficacy and Tolerability of First-Line Cetuximab Plus Leucovorin, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX-4) Versus FOLFOX-4 in Patients With RAS Wild-Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: The Open-Label, Randomized, Phase III TAILOR Trial

Efficacy and Tolerability of First-Line Cetuximab Plus Leucovorin, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX-4) Versus FOLFOX-4 in Patients With RAS Wild-Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: The Open-Label, Randomized, Phase III TAILOR Trial 30199311 2018 09 10 1527-7755 2018 Sep 10 Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology J. Clin. Oncol. Efficacy and Tolerability of First-Line Cetuximab Plus Leucovorin, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX-4 (...) ) Versus FOLFOX-4 in Patients With RAS Wild-Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: The Open-Label, Randomized, Phase III TAILOR Trial. JCO2018783183 10.1200/JCO.2018.78.3183 Purpose Cetuximab in combination with chemotherapy is a standard-of-care first-line treatment regimen for patients with RAS wild-type (wt) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC); however, the efficacy of cetuximab plus leucovorin, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) has never before been proven in a controlled and randomized phase III

EvidenceUpdates2018

4. Population health interventions to improve colorectal cancer screening by fecal immunochemical tests: A systematic review

Population health interventions to improve colorectal cancer screening by fecal immunochemical tests: A systematic review 30367972 2018 11 16 1096-0260 118 2018 Oct 24 Preventive medicine Prev Med Population health interventions to improve colorectal cancer screening by fecal immunochemical tests: A systematic review. 113-121 S0091-7435(18)30340-2 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.10.021 Despite clear evidence that colorectal cancer (CRC) screening reduces mortality, screening, including fecal (...) Colorectal cancer Electronic health records Fecal immunochemical test Interventions Population management Screening Systematic review 2018 06 10 2018 09 07 2018 10 20 2018 10 28 6 0 2018 10 28 6 0 2018 10 28 6 0 aheadofprint 30367972 S0091-7435(18)30340-2 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.10.021

EvidenceUpdates2018

5. Evaluation of Interventions Intended to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates in the United States: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Evaluation of Interventions Intended to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates in the United States: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis 30326005 2018 10 19 2168-6114 2018 Oct 15 JAMA internal medicine JAMA Intern Med Evaluation of Interventions Intended to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates in the United States: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.4637 Colorectal cancer screening (CRC) is recommended by all major US medical organizations but remains (...) underused. To identify interventions associated with increasing CRC screening rates and their effect sizes. PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, the Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched from January 1, 1996, to August 31, 2017. Key search terms included colorectal cancer and screening. Randomized clinical trials of US-based interventions in clinical settings designed to improve CRC screening test completion in average-risk adults. At least 2 investigators

EvidenceUpdates2018

6. Influence of Varying Quantitative Fecal Immunochemical Test Positivity Thresholds on Colorectal Cancer Detection: A Community-Based Cohort Study.

Influence of Varying Quantitative Fecal Immunochemical Test Positivity Thresholds on Colorectal Cancer Detection: A Community-Based Cohort Study. Background: The fecal immunochemical test (FIT) is commonly used for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Despite demographic variations in stool hemoglobin concentrations, few data exist regarding optimal positivity thresholds by age and sex. Objective: To identify programmatic (multitest) FIT performance characteristics and optimal FIT quantitative (...) hemoglobin positivity thresholds in a large, population-based, screening program. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: Kaiser Permanente Northern and Southern California. Participants: Adults aged 50 to 75 years who were eligible for screening and had baseline quantitative FIT results (2013 to 2014) and 2 years of follow-up. Nearly two thirds (411 241) had FIT screening in the previous 2 years. Measurements: FIT programmatic sensitivity for CRC and number of positive test results per cancer case

Annals of Internal Medicine2018

7. Effectiveness of a Mailed Colorectal Cancer Screening Outreach Program in Community Health Clinics: The STOP CRC Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial

Effectiveness of a Mailed Colorectal Cancer Screening Outreach Program in Community Health Clinics: The STOP CRC Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial 30083752 2018 09 05 2168-6114 178 9 2018 Sep 01 JAMA internal medicine JAMA Intern Med Effectiveness of a Mailed Colorectal Cancer Screening Outreach Program in Community Health Clinics: The STOP CRC Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial. 1174-1181 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3629 Approximately 24 million US individuals receive care at federally qualified (...) health centers, which historically have low rates of colorectal cancer screening. The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends routine colorectal cancer screening for individuals aged 50 to 75 years. To determine the effectiveness of an electronic health record (EHR)-embedded mailed fecal immunochemical test (FIT) outreach program implemented in health centers as part of standard care. This cluster randomized pragmatic clinical trial was conducted in 26 federally qualified health center clinics

EvidenceUpdates2018

8. Incidence of faecal occult blood test interval cancers in population-based colorectal cancer screening: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Incidence of faecal occult blood test interval cancers in population-based colorectal cancer screening: a systematic review and meta-analysis 29934436 2018 06 23 1468-3288 2018 Jun 22 Gut Gut Incidence of faecal occult blood test interval cancers in population-based colorectal cancer screening: a systematic review and meta-analysis. gutjnl-2017-315340 10.1136/gutjnl-2017-315340 Faecal immunochemical tests (FITs) are replacing guaiac faecal occult blood tests (gFOBTs) for colorectal cancer (CRC (...) ) screening. Incidence of interval colorectal cancer (iCRC) following a negative stool test result is not yet known. We aimed to compare incidence of iCRC following a negative FIT or gFOBT. We searched Ovid Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Science Citation Index, PubMed and Google Scholar from inception to 12 December 2017 for citations related to CRC screening based on stool tests. We included studies on FIT or gFOBT iCRC in average-risk screening populations. Main outcome was pooled incidence rate

EvidenceUpdates2018

9. Colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer Top results for colorectal cancer - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast My query is: English Français Deutsch Čeština Español Magyar Svenska ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box (...) and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for colorectal cancer The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical

Trip Latest and Greatest2018

11. Colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer Autosynthesis - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast My query is: English Français Deutsch Čeština Español Magyar Svenska ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button

Trip Evidence Maps2018

12. Effect of Fruquintinib vs Placebo on Overall Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: The FRESCO Randomized Clinical Trial.

Effect of Fruquintinib vs Placebo on Overall Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: The FRESCO Randomized Clinical Trial. Importance: Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) have limited effective and tolerable treatment options. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral fruquintinib, a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor, as third-line or later therapy in patients with metastatic CRC. Design, Setting (...) , and Participants: FRESCO (Fruquintinib Efficacy and Safety in 3+ Line Colorectal Cancer Patients) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter (28 hospitals in China), phase 3 clinical trial. From December 2014 to May 2016, screening took place among 519 patients aged 18 to 75 years who had metastatic CRC that progressed after at least 2 lines of chemotherapy but had not received VEGFR inhibitor therapy; 416 met the eligibility criteria and were stratified by prior anti-VEGF therapy and K

JAMA2018

13. 3 versus 6 months of adjuvant oxaliplatin-fluoropyrimidine combination therapy for colorectal cancer (SCOT): an international, randomised, phase 3, non-inferiority trial

3 versus 6 months of adjuvant oxaliplatin-fluoropyrimidine combination therapy for colorectal cancer (SCOT): an international, randomised, phase 3, non-inferiority trial 29611518 2018 04 08 1474-5488 19 4 2018 Apr The Lancet. Oncology Lancet Oncol. 3 versus 6 months of adjuvant oxaliplatin-fluoropyrimidine combination therapy for colorectal cancer (SCOT): an international, randomised, phase 3, non-inferiority trial. 562-578 S1470-2045(18)30093-7 10.1016/S1470-2045(18)30093-7 6 months (...) of oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy is usually given as adjuvant treatment for stage 3 colorectal cancer. We investigated whether 3 months of oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy would be non-inferior to the usual 6 months of treatment. The SCOT study was an international, randomised, phase 3, non-inferiority trial done at 244 centres. Patients aged 18 years or older with high-risk stage II and stage III colorectal cancer underwent central randomisation with minimisation for centre, choice of regimen, sex

EvidenceUpdates2018

14. Modified XELIRI (capecitabine plus irinotecan) versus FOLFIRI (leucovorin, fluorouracil, and irinotecan), both either with or without bevacizumab, as second-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (AXEPT): a multicentre, open-label, randomised, non-

Modified XELIRI (capecitabine plus irinotecan) versus FOLFIRI (leucovorin, fluorouracil, and irinotecan), both either with or without bevacizumab, as second-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (AXEPT): a multicentre, open-label, randomised, non- 29555258 2018 05 04 1474-5488 19 5 2018 May The Lancet. Oncology Lancet Oncol. Modified XELIRI (capecitabine plus irinotecan) versus FOLFIRI (leucovorin, fluorouracil, and irinotecan), both either with or without bevacizumab, as second-line (...) therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (AXEPT): a multicentre, open-label, randomised, non-inferiority, phase 3 trial. 660-671 S1470-2045(18)30140-2 10.1016/S1470-2045(18)30140-2 Studies of a modified XELIRI (mXELIRI; capecitabine plus irinotecan) regimen suggest promising efficacy and tolerability profiles in the first-line and second-line settings. Therefore, we aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of the mXELIRI regimen with that of standard FOLFIRI (leucovorin, fluorouracil, and irinotecan

EvidenceUpdates2018

15. Effect of More vs Less Frequent Follow-up Testing on Overall and Colorectal Cancer-Specific Mortality in Patients With Stage II or III Colorectal Cancer: The COLOFOL Randomized Clinical Trial.

Effect of More vs Less Frequent Follow-up Testing on Overall and Colorectal Cancer-Specific Mortality in Patients With Stage II or III Colorectal Cancer: The COLOFOL Randomized Clinical Trial. Importance: Intensive follow-up of patients after curative surgery for colorectal cancer is common in clinical practice, but evidence of a survival benefit is limited. Objective: To examine overall mortality, colorectal cancer-specific mortality, and colorectal cancer-specific recurrence rates among (...) patients with stage II or III colorectal cancer who were randomized after curative surgery to 2 alternative schedules for follow-up testing with computed tomography and carcinoembryonic antigen. Design, Setting, and Participants: Unblinded randomized trial including 2509 patients with stage II or III colorectal cancer treated at 24 centers in Sweden, Denmark, and Uruguay from January 2006 through December 2010 and followed up for 5 years; follow-up ended on December 31, 2015. Interventions: Patients

JAMA2018

16. Association Between Intensity of Posttreatment Surveillance Testing and Detection of Recurrence in Patients With Colorectal Cancer.

Association Between Intensity of Posttreatment Surveillance Testing and Detection of Recurrence in Patients With Colorectal Cancer. Importance: Surveillance testing is performed after primary treatment for colorectal cancer (CRC), but it is unclear if the intensity of testing decreases time to detection of recurrence or affects patient survival. Objective: To determine if intensity of posttreatment surveillance is associated with time to detection of CRC recurrence, rate of recurrence (...) , resection for recurrence, or overall survival. Design, Setting, and Participants: A retrospective cohort study of patient data abstracted from the medical record as part of a Commission on Cancer Special Study merged with records from the National Cancer Database. A random sample of patients (n=8529) diagnosed with stage I, II, or III CRC treated at a Commission on Cancer-accredited facilities (2006-2007) with follow-up through December 31, 2014. Exposures: Intensity of imaging and carcinoembryonic

JAMA2018

17. Association of Colonoscopy Adenoma Findings With Long-term Colorectal Cancer Incidence.

Association of Colonoscopy Adenoma Findings With Long-term Colorectal Cancer Incidence. Importance: Individuals with adenomatous polyps are advised to undergo repeated colonoscopy surveillance to prevent subsequent colorectal cancer (CRC), but the relationship between adenomas at colonoscopy and long-term CRC incidence is unclear. Objective: To compare long-term CRC incidence by colonoscopy adenoma findings. Design, Setting, and Participants: Multicenter, prospective cohort study (...) of participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer randomized clinical trial of flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSG) beginning in 1993 with follow-up for CRC incidence to 2013 across the United States. Participants included 154 900 men and women aged 55 to 74 years enrolled in PLCO of whom 15 935 underwent colonoscopy following their first positive FSG screening result. The final day of follow-up was December 31, 2013. Exposures: Enrolled participants had been randomized to FSG or usual care

JAMA2018

18. Effect of public reporting of surgeons' outcomes on patient selection, "gaming," and mortality in colorectal cancer surgery in England: population based cohort study.

Effect of public reporting of surgeons' outcomes on patient selection, "gaming," and mortality in colorectal cancer surgery in England: population based cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of surgeon specific outcome reporting in colorectal cancer surgery on risk averse clinical practice, "gaming" of clinical data, and 90 day postoperative mortality. DESIGN: National cohort study. SETTING: English National Health Service hospital trusts. POPULATION: 111 431 patients diagnosed (...) as having colorectal cancer from 1 April 2011 to 31 March 2015 included in the National Bowel Cancer Audit. INTERVENTION: Public reporting of surgeon specific 90 day mortality in elective colorectal cancer surgery in England introduced in June 2013. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of patients with colorectal cancer who had an elective major resection, predicted 90 day mortality based on characteristics of patients and tumours, and observed 90 day mortality adjusted for differences in characteristics

BMJ2018

19. Comparison of prognostic models to predict the occurrence of colorectal cancer in asymptomatic individuals: a systematic literature review and external validation in the EPIC and UK Biobank prospective cohort studies

Comparison of prognostic models to predict the occurrence of colorectal cancer in asymptomatic individuals: a systematic literature review and external validation in the EPIC and UK Biobank prospective cohort studies 29615487 2018 04 04 1468-3288 2018 Apr 03 Gut Gut Comparison of prognostic models to predict the occurrence of colorectal cancer in asymptomatic individuals: a systematic literature review and external validation in the EPIC and UK Biobank prospective cohort studies. gutjnl-2017 (...) -315730 10.1136/gutjnl-2017-315730 To systematically identify and validate published colorectal cancer risk prediction models that do not require invasive testing in two large population-based prospective cohorts. Models were identified through an update of a published systematic review and validated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and the UK Biobank. The performance of the models to predict the occurrence of colorectal cancer within 5 or 10 years after study

EvidenceUpdates2018