Latest & greatest articles for colon cancer screening

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Top results for colon cancer screening

141. Randomised controlled trials: A decision aid to enhance informed decision making about bowel cancer screening improved knowledge but reduced screening uptake

Randomised controlled trials: A decision aid to enhance informed decision making about bowel cancer screening improved knowledge but reduced screening uptake A decision aid to enhance informed decision making about bowel cancer screening improved knowledge but reduced screening uptake | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we (...) use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here A decision aid to enhance informed decision making about bowel cancer screening improved knowledge

2011 Evidence-Based Medicine

142. Randomised controlled trial: A decision aid to support informed choice about bowel cancer screening in people with low educational level improves knowledge but reduces screening uptake

adults with low education: randomised controlled trial . . Colorectal cancer (CRC) accounts for 9% of cancer deaths worldwide, making it the second leading cause of cancer death. 1 Survival is strongly related to the stage of disease, with up to 90% of CRC deaths estimated to be preventable if the disease is diagnosed at an early stage. 2 Randomised controlled trial data show that annual or biennial screening using faecal occult blood testing (FOBT) reduces mortality by up to 27% in those who use (...) Randomised controlled trial: A decision aid to support informed choice about bowel cancer screening in people with low educational level improves knowledge but reduces screening uptake A decision aid to support informed choice about bowel cancer screening in people with low educational level improves knowledge but reduces screening uptake | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your

2011 Evidence-Based Nursing

143. Cohort study: Repeat invitations to non-attenders increase uptake of colorectal cancer screening; incidence screening continues to detect important cancers

cancer: preventable and treatable Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in men and women. CRC is preventable by polypectomy, and, with proper screening, it can be found in early stages when the disease is most treatable, minimising morbidity and mortality. The American Cancer Society recommends screening for average-risk adults to start at age 50, but about half of the people who should be screened are not screened. The faecal occult blood test (FOBT) is an inexpensive (...) Cohort study: Repeat invitations to non-attenders increase uptake of colorectal cancer screening; incidence screening continues to detect important cancers Repeat invitations to non-attenders increase uptake of colorectal cancer screening; incidence screening continues to detect important cancers | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about

2011 Evidence-Based Nursing

144. Screening by chest radiograph and lung cancer mortality: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) randomized trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Screening by chest radiograph and lung cancer mortality: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) randomized trial. The effect on mortality of screening for lung cancer with modern chest radiographs is unknown.To evaluate the effect on mortality of screening for lung cancer using radiographs in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial.Randomized controlled trial that involved 154,901 participants aged 55 through 74 years, 77,445 of whom were assigned (...) % at years 1 through 3; the rate of screening use in the usual care group was 11%. Cumulative lung cancer incidence rates through 13 years of follow-up were 20.1 per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group and 19.2 per 10,000 person-years in the usual care group (rate ratio [RR]; 1.05, 95% CI, 0.98-1.12). A total of 1213 lung cancer deaths were observed in the intervention group compared with 1230 in usual care group through 13 years (mortality RR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.87-1.22). Stage and histology were

2011 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

145. Cost effectiveness and projected national impact of colorectal cancer screening in France Full Text available with Trip Pro

summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary The objective was to examine the cost-effectiveness of a programme to screen the population for colorectal cancer, using colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, second-generation colon capsule endoscopy (CCE), the faecal immunochemical test (FIT), or the guaiac faecal occult blood test (FOBT). FIT every year was the most cost-effective (...) strategy, in France, but further studies were needed. The cost-effectiveness methods were robust and key areas of uncertainty were investigated. The authors’ conclusions appear to be valid. Type of economic evaluation Cost-effectiveness analysis Study objective The objective was to examine the cost-effectiveness of a programme to screen the population for colorectal cancer, using colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, second-generation colon capsule endoscopy (CCE), the faecal immunochemical test (FIT

2011 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

146. Effect of evidence based risk information on "informed choice" in colorectal cancer screening: randomised controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of evidence based risk information on "informed choice" in colorectal cancer screening: randomised controlled trial. To compare the effect of evidence based information on risk with that of standard information on informed choice in screening for colorectal cancer.Randomised controlled trial with 6 months' follow-up.German statutory health insurance scheme.1577 insured people who were members of the target group for colorectal cancer screening (age 50-75, no history of colorectal cancer (...) ).Brochure with evidence based risk information on colorectal cancer screening and two optional interactive internet modules on risk and diagnostic tests; official information leaflet of the German colorectal cancer screening programme (control).The primary end point was "informed choice," comprising "knowledge," "attitude," and "combination of actual and planned uptake." Secondary outcomes were "knowledge" and "combination of actual and planned uptake." Knowledge and attitude were assessed after 6 weeks

2011 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

147. Effect of screening on ovarian cancer mortality: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Randomized Controlled Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of screening on ovarian cancer mortality: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Randomized Controlled Trial. Screening for ovarian cancer with cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) and transvaginal ultrasound has an unknown effect on mortality.To evaluate the effect of screening for ovarian cancer on mortality in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial.Randomized controlled trial of 78,216 women aged 55 to 74 years assigned to undergo (...) %). There were 2924 deaths due to other causes (excluding ovarian, colorectal, and lung cancer) (76.6 per 10,000 person-years) in the intervention group and 2914 deaths (76.2 per 10,000 person-years) in the usual care group (RR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.96-1.06).Among women in the general US population, simultaneous screening with CA-125 and transvaginal ultrasound compared with usual care did not reduce ovarian cancer mortality. Diagnostic evaluation following a false-positive screening test result was associated

2011 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

148. Effect of repeated invitations on uptake of colorectal cancer screening using faecal occult blood testing: analysis of prevalence and incidence screening. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of repeated invitations on uptake of colorectal cancer screening using faecal occult blood testing: analysis of prevalence and incidence screening. To analyse the effects of prevalence and incidence screening on uptake and detection of cancer in an ongoing, dynamic programme for colorectal screening using faecal occult blood testing.Analysis of prevalence and incidence screening.Three rounds of biennial colorectal screening using the guaiac faecal occult blood test in east and north east (...) % and for a second incidence screen were 1.1% and 94.5%. The positive predictive value of a positive faecal occult blood test result for cancer was 11.0% for prevalence screening, 6.5% for the first incidence screen, and 7.5% for the second incidence screen. The corresponding values for the positive predictive value for adenoma were 35.5%, 29.4%, and 26.7%. The proportion of cancers at stage I dropped from 46.5% for prevalence screening to 41% for first incidence screening and 35% for second incidence

2010 BMJ

149. Analysis of deaths occurring within the Nottingham trial of faecal occult blood screening for colorectal cancer (Abstract)

Analysis of deaths occurring within the Nottingham trial of faecal occult blood screening for colorectal cancer To report the causes of, and ages at, death of subjects in an English colorectal cancer screening trial.Analysis of 78 708 deaths occurring between 1981 and 2008, within the Nottingham randomised controlled trial of biennial faecal occult blood testing.Cause of death, age at death by sex and by cause.Significantly more subjects died from verified colorectal cancer in the trial's (...) control group than in the intervention group (3.2% vs 2.9%). For no other major cause of death was the difference in proportion across the two groups statistically significant. Age at death was lower for cancer than for other principal causes, except for ischaemic heart disease among women. However, mean age at death was higher for colorectal cancer than for other cancers, except for prostate cancer among men. Increasing levels of material deprivation significantly lowered the expected ages at death

2010 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

150. Comparison of guaiac-based and quantitative immunochemical fecal occult blood testing in a population at average risk undergoing colorectal cancer screening (Abstract)

Comparison of guaiac-based and quantitative immunochemical fecal occult blood testing in a population at average risk undergoing colorectal cancer screening Although some studies have shown that the quantitative, immunochemical fecal occult blood test (FOBT) (qFIT) has better performance characteristics than the standard guaiac-based FOBT (GT) for identifying advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACRN), there is limited information on test performance of these tests in average-risk populations.Seven (...) hundred seventy consecutive average-risk patients from four centers who were undergoing screening colonoscopy also provided stool samples. Stool specimens from three consecutive bowel movements were applied to a hemoccult II test card (Beckman Coulter, Fullerton, CA) and OC-SENSA MICRO (Eiken Chemical, Tokyo, Japan) sampling probes at the same time. We measured the diagnostic value of the qFIT for detecting an ACRN by using three criteria: sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios. A receiver

2010 EvidenceUpdates

151. Stool DNA testing to screen for colorectal cancer in the medicare population: a cost-effectiveness analysis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

at a cost of $350 per test if the relative adherence to stool DNA testing were at least 50% better than that with other screening tests.None of the results changed substantially when a cohort of persons aged 50 years was considered.No pathways other than the traditional adenoma-carcinoma sequence were modeled.Stool DNA testing could be a cost-effective alternative for colorectal cancer screening if the cost of the test substantially decreased or if its availability would entice a large fraction (...) Stool DNA testing to screen for colorectal cancer in the medicare population: a cost-effectiveness analysis. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services considered whether to reimburse stool DNA testing for colorectal cancer screening among Medicare enrollees.To evaluate the conditions under which stool DNA testing could be cost-effective compared with the colorectal cancer screening tests currently reimbursed by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.Comparative microsimulation modeling

2010 Annals of Internal Medicine

152. A randomized controlled trial of a multilevel intervention to increase colorectal cancer screening among Latino immigrants in a primary care facility Full Text available with Trip Pro

A randomized controlled trial of a multilevel intervention to increase colorectal cancer screening among Latino immigrants in a primary care facility Latino immigrants face a higher burden of colorectal cancer (CRC) and screening rates are low.To assess the effectiveness of a multilevel intervention in increasing the rate of CRC screening among Latino immigrants.A randomized controlled trial, with randomization at the physician level.Pairs of 65 primary care physicians and 65 Latino immigrant (...) patients participated, 31 in the intervention and 34 in the control group.CRC educational video in Spanish on a portable personal digital video display device accompanied by a brochure with key information for the patient, and a patient-delivered paper-based reminder for their physician.Completed CRC screening, physician recommendation for CRC screening, and patient adherence to physician recommended CRC screening.The overall rate of completed screening for CRC was 55% for the intervention and 18

2010 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

153. How equitable are colorectal cancer screening programs which include FOBTs? A review of qualitative and quantitative studies (Abstract)

How equitable are colorectal cancer screening programs which include FOBTs? A review of qualitative and quantitative studies To review published literature on the equity of participation in colorectal cancer screening amongst different population subgroups, in addition to identifying factors identified as barriers and facilitators to equitable screening. Studies were included in the review if they included FOBT as at least one of the screening tests.Relevant published articles were identified (...) through systematic electronic searches of selected databases and the examination of the bibliographies of retrieved articles. Studies of the association with colorectal cancer screening test participation, barriers to equitable participation in screening, and studies examining interventional actions to facilitate screening test participation were included. Data extraction and analysis was undertaken using an approach to the synthesis of qualitative and quantitative studies called Realist Review.Sixty

2010 EvidenceUpdates

154. Could the colonic capsule PillCam Colon be clinically useful for selecting patients who deserve a complete colonoscopy?: results of clinical comparison with colonoscopy in the perspective of colorectal cancer screening (Abstract)

Could the colonic capsule PillCam Colon be clinically useful for selecting patients who deserve a complete colonoscopy?: results of clinical comparison with colonoscopy in the perspective of colorectal cancer screening Preliminary studies have shown the possibility of detecting colonic polyps and tumors using the PillCam Colon capsule endoscope (CCE) (Given Imaging, Yoqneam, Israel). The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of CCE to detect clinically relevant colonic findings (...) as compared with colonoscopy, and further, to test the assumption that CCE used in the frame of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening could accurately discriminate patients deserving a complete colonoscopy.A total of 128 patients (67 men, 55+/-14 years) with an indication of colonoscopy were investigated by CCE, followed by colonoscopy under general anesthesia on the next day. Bowel cleansing was carried out according to a previously published protocol (3 l polyethylene glycol+2 doses of sodium phosphate

2010 EvidenceUpdates

155. Screening for colorectal cancer: randomised trial comparing guaiac-based and immunochemical faecal occult blood testing and flexible sigmoidoscopy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Screening for colorectal cancer: randomised trial comparing guaiac-based and immunochemical faecal occult blood testing and flexible sigmoidoscopy Screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) is widely accepted, but there is no consensus on the preferred strategy. We conducted a randomised trial comparing participation and detection rates (DR) per screenee of guaiac-based faecal occult blood test (gFOBT), immunochemical FOBT (FIT), and flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) for CRC screening.A representative (...) %) for gFOBT, 61.5% (CI, 60.1 to 62.9%) for FIT and 32.4% (CI, 31.1 to 33.7%) for FS screening. gFOBT was positive in 2.8%, FIT in 4.8% and FS in 10.2%. The DR of advanced neoplasia was significantly higher in the FIT (2.4%; OR, 2.0; CI, 1.3 to 3.1) and the FS arm (8.0%; OR, 7.0; CI, 4.6 to 10.7) than the gFOBT arm (1.1%). FS demonstrated a higher diagnostic yield of advanced neoplasia per 100 invitees (2.4; CI, 2.0 to 2.8) than gFOBT (0.6; CI, 0.4 to 0.8) or FIT (1.5; CI, 1.2 to 1.9) screening.This

2010 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

156. Enhancing Use and Quality of Colorectal Cancer Screening

is needed and must be a scientific priority. Screening is defined as the testing of individuals for a disease prior to the onset of any symptoms. The goal of colorectal cancer screening is to reduce disease-specific mortality through prevention and early detection. Colorectal cancer screening, as with any screening test, is most effective when it is applied to a large percentage of eligible people and utilized appropriately. Major published guidelines describe the eligible target population (...) people are newly diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 50,000 die. Polyps are abnormal growths of tissue along the lining of the colon. Many polyps are harmless, but a common type of polyp, the adenoma, can develop over time into a colorectal cancer. An effective way to reduce mortality from colorectal cancer is to screen for it and its precursor, the adenoma. Although screening methods have been available for decades and new methods continue to develop, screening rates remain low. The purpose

2010 NIH Consensus Statements

157. A decision aid to support informed choices about bowel cancer screening among adults with low education: randomised controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

A decision aid to support informed choices about bowel cancer screening among adults with low education: randomised controlled trial. To determine whether a decision aid designed for adults with low education and literacy can support informed choice and involvement in decisions about screening for bowel cancer.Randomised controlled trial.Areas in New South Wales, Australia identified as socioeconomically disadvantaged (low education attainment, high unemployment, and unskilled occupations).572 (...) adults aged between 55 and 64 with low educational attainment, eligible for bowel cancer screening.Patient decision aid comprising a paper based interactive booklet (with and without a question prompt list) and a DVD, presenting quantitative risk information on the possible outcomes of screening using faecal occult blood testing compared with no testing. The control group received standard information developed for the Australian national bowel screening programme. All materials and a faecal occult

2010 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

158. Randomised controlled trial: Once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy screening for adults aged 55?64 years old reduces the incidence of colorectal cancer and colorectal cancer deaths

Randomised controlled trial: Once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy screening for adults aged 55?64 years old reduces the incidence of colorectal cancer and colorectal cancer deaths Once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy screening for adults aged 55–64 years old reduces the incidence of colorectal cancer and colorectal cancer deaths | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser (...) years old reduces the incidence of colorectal cancer and colorectal cancer deaths Article Text Diagnostics Randomised controlled trial Once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy screening for adults aged 55–64 years old reduces the incidence of colorectal cancer and colorectal cancer deaths Johannes Blom Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Atkin WS , Edwards R , Kralj-Hans I , et al .; UK Flexible Sigmoidoscopy Trial Investigators . Once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy screening in prevention

2010 Evidence-Based Medicine

159. Impact of technology overlapping: a case study on colorectal cancer screening Full Text available with Trip Pro

published sources. Measure of benefit: Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were the summary benefit measure and they were discounted at an annual rate of 5%. Cost data: The economic analysis included the direct medical costs of the colorectal cancer screening tests, the treatment of screening-related complications, and the treatment of colorectal cancer, which depended on the disease stage. The unit costs were reported for the screening tests; the other costs were presented as category totals. The costs (...) , and it is not possible to judge their validity. Some data were varied in the sensitivity analysis. QALYs were a valid measure, as colorectal cancer has an impact on survival and quality of life. They can also be compared with the benefits for disease interventions. Costs: The economic analysis was consistent with the perspective adopted. The authors stated that the costs of developing a screening programme were not considered because the analysis focused on the screening tests per patient pathway. The unit costs

2010 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

160. Comparison of immunochemical and guaiac-based fecal occult blood test in screening and surveillance for advanced colorectal neoplasms: a meta-analysis

Comparison of immunochemical and guaiac-based fecal occult blood test in screening and surveillance for advanced colorectal neoplasms: a meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2010 DARE.