Latest & greatest articles for colon cancer screening

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Top results for colon cancer screening

121. Guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance after screening and polypectomy: A Consensus Update by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer

. Alberts DS, Maratinez ME, Hess LM, et al. Phase III trial of ursodeoxycholic acid to prevent colorectal adenoma recurrence. J Natl Cancer Inst 2005;97:846–853. 14. Lieberman DA, Weiss DG, Harford WV, et al. Five year colon surveillanceafterscreeningcolonoscopy.Gastroenterology2007; 133:1077–1085. 15. Schoenfeld P, Cash B, Flood A, et al. Colonoscopic screening of average-risk women for colorectal neoplasia. N Engl J Med 2005; 352:2061–2068. 16. Baxter NN, Sutradhar R, Forbes SS, et al. Analysis (...) - ferences in proximal polyp/cancer morphology, the skill of the endoscopist, and variable quality of colonoscopy. Serrated polyps and some classic adenomatous polyps in the proximal colon may be challenging to detect if they are ?at, covered with mucus, or behind folds. Most prior studies of colonoscopy have failed to report on the quality of the colonoscopy examinations. A second hypothesis is that neoplastic lesions of the proximal colon may biolog- ically differ from distal lesions and progress

2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

122. Preliminary analysis of the cost-effectiveness of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: demonstrating the potential value of comprehensive real world data

and monitoring adenomas with a high-risk of developing colorectal cancer or identifying and treating cancer at an earlier stage. The distribution of disease stage at detection was from the NBCSP for both screened and unscreened groups. Data on five-year survival from time of diagnosis of colorectal cancer were from BioGrid Australia (a large database). After five years, survival was assumed to revert to the normal age-specific life expectancy from Australian government statistics. Other key parameters (...) of using real-world data from a case study of Australia's National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) to inform cost-effectiveness. Interventions Australia's NBCSP was compared with no screening. The screening programme consisted of an invitation to be screened, a faecal occult blood test (FOBT) for those who participated, colonoscopy for those with a positive result, resection or surveillance of any adenomas found, and treatment for any colorectal cancer. Without screening, detection of adenomas

2012 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

123. Population Screening Act: accelerated repeat screening for bowel cancer

: accelerated repeat screening for bowel cancer. The Hague: Health Council of the Netherlands Gezondheidsraad (GR). 2012/01. 2012 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Colorectal Neoplasms; Mass Screenings Language Published English Country of organisation Netherlands English summary An English language summary is available. Address for correspondence Postbus 16052, 2500 BB Den Haag, The Netherlands. Tel: +31 70 340 7520;Fax: +31 70 340 7523 Email: info@gr.nl (...) Population Screening Act: accelerated repeat screening for bowel cancer Population Screening Act: accelerated repeat screening for bowel cancer Population Screening Act: accelerated repeat screening for bowel cancer Health Council of the Netherlands Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Health Council of the Netherlands. Population Screening Act

2012 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

124. Interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening: an integrative review Full Text available with Trip Pro

A, Breslau ES. Interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening: an integrative review. Nursing Outlook 2012; 60(4): 172-181.e13 PubMedID DOI Original Paper URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Colorectal Neoplasms /prevention & Early Detection of Cancer /statistics & Health Promotion /methods; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; control; numerical data AccessionNumber 12012041142 Date bibliographic record published 18/12/2012 Date abstract record published 07/10/2013 (...) Interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening: an integrative review Interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening: an integrative review Interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening: an integrative review Rawl SM, Menon U, Burness A, Breslau ES CRD summary This review concluded that several effective interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening were identified, but trial limitations made it difficult to draw definitive conclusions. The review had numerous

2012 DARE.

125. Fecal DNA testing in screening for colorectal cancer in average-risk adults

in asymptomatic, average-risk patients. There is also insufficient evidence for the harms, analytic validity, and acceptability of testing in comparison to other screening modalities. Existing evidence has little or no applicability to currently available fecal DNA testing. Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Biomarkers, Tumor; Colorectal Neoplasms; DNA, Neoplasm; Fecess Language Published English Country of organisation United States English summary An English language (...) Fecal DNA testing in screening for colorectal cancer in average-risk adults Fecal DNA testing in screening for colorectal cancer in average-risk adults Fecal DNA testing in screening for colorectal cancer in average-risk adults Lin JS, Webber EM, Beil TL, Goddard KA, Whitlock EP Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Lin JS

2012 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

126. Cohort study: Cohort analysis finds that the proportion of people who meet high risk criteria for colorectal, breast or prostate cancer screening based on family history increases between age 30 and 50

Cohort study: Cohort analysis finds that the proportion of people who meet high risk criteria for colorectal, breast or prostate cancer screening based on family history increases between age 30 and 50 Cohort analysis finds that the proportion of people who meet high risk criteria for colorectal, breast or prostate cancer screening based on family history increases between age 30 and 50 | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising (...) Cohort analysis finds that the proportion of people who meet high risk criteria for colorectal, breast or prostate cancer screening based on family history increases between age 30 and 50 Article Text Therapeutics Cohort study Cohort analysis finds that the proportion of people who meet high risk criteria for colorectal, breast or prostate cancer screening based on family history increases between age 30 and 50 Harvey J Murff Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Ziogas A , Horick NK , Kinney

2012 Evidence-Based Medicine

127. Cross-sectional study: Number needed to screen to detect adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer is higher in women than in similarly aged men

Cross-sectional study: Number needed to screen to detect adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer is higher in women than in similarly aged men Number needed to screen to detect adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer is higher in women than in similarly aged men | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use (...) cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Number needed to screen to detect adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer is higher in women than

2012 Evidence-Based Medicine

128. Endoscopist-directed propofol administration versus anesthesiologist assistance for colorectal cancer screening: a cost-effectiveness analysis

Endoscopist-directed propofol administration versus anesthesiologist assistance for colorectal cancer screening: a cost-effectiveness analysis Endoscopist-directed propofol administration versus anesthesiologist assistance for colorectal cancer screening: a cost-effectiveness analysis Endoscopist-directed propofol administration versus anesthesiologist assistance for colorectal cancer screening: a cost-effectiveness analysis Hassan C, Rex DK, Cooper GS, Benamouzig R Record Status (...) This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary The study assessed the economic benefit of endoscopist-directed administration of propofol compared with anaesthetist assistance for patients undergoing colonoscopy for colorectal cancer screening in the USA

2012 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

129. Colorectal-cancer-screening update; status in Austria and European countries; and quality assurance of screening-colonoscopy

Colorectal-cancer-screening update; status in Austria and European countries; and quality assurance of screening-colonoscopy Kolonkrebsscreening - teil 3: status screening-aktivitten und qualittssicherung screening-koloskopie [Colorectal-cancer-screening update; status in Austria and European countries; and quality assurance of screening-colonoscopy] Kolonkrebsscreening - teil 3: status screening-aktivitten und qualittssicherung screening-koloskopie [Colorectal-cancer-screening update; status (...) in Austria and European countries; and quality assurance of screening-colonoscopy] Patera N Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Patera N. Kolonkrebsscreening - teil 3: status screening-aktivitten und qualittssicherung screening-koloskopie. [Colorectal-cancer-screening update; status in Austria and European countries; and quality

2012 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

130. Colorectal-cancer incidence and mortality with screening flexible sigmoidoscopy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

and deaths from the disease were ascertained.Of the 77,445 participants randomly assigned to screening (intervention group), 83.5% underwent baseline flexible sigmoidoscopy and 54.0% were screened at 3 or 5 years. The incidence of colorectal cancer after a median follow-up of 11.9 years was 11.9 cases per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group (1012 cases), as compared with 15.2 cases per 10,000 person-years in the usual-care group (1287 cases), which represents a 21% reduction (relative risk (...) Colorectal-cancer incidence and mortality with screening flexible sigmoidoscopy. The benefits of endoscopic testing for colorectal-cancer screening are uncertain. We evaluated the effect of screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy on colorectal-cancer incidence and mortality.From 1993 through 2001, we randomly assigned 154,900 men and women 55 to 74 years of age either to screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy, with a repeat screening at 3 or 5 years, or to usual care. Cases of colorectal cancer

2012 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

131. Colonoscopy versus fecal immunochemical testing in colorectal-cancer screening. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Colonoscopy versus fecal immunochemical testing in colorectal-cancer screening. Colonoscopy and fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) are accepted strategies for colorectal-cancer screening in the average-risk population.In this randomized, controlled trial involving asymptomatic adults 50 to 69 years of age, we compared one-time colonoscopy in 26,703 subjects with FIT every 2 years in 26,599 subjects. The primary outcome was the rate of death from colorectal cancer at 10 years. This interim (...) report describes rates of participation, diagnostic findings, and occurrence of major complications at completion of the baseline screening. Study outcomes were analyzed in both intention-to-screen and as-screened populations.The rate of participation was higher in the FIT group than in the colonoscopy group (34.2% vs. 24.6%, P<0.001). Colorectal cancer was found in 30 subjects (0.1%) in the colonoscopy group and 33 subjects (0.1%) in the FIT group (odds ratio, 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI

2012 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

132. The Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening score: a validated tool that stratifies risk for colorectal advanced neoplasia in asymptomatic Asian subjects (Abstract)

subjects undergoing screening colonoscopy, multiple logistic regression was applied to identify significant risk factors for advanced colorectal neoplasia defined as invasive carcinoma or advanced adenoma. The ORs for significant risk factors were utilised to develop a risk score ranging from 0 to 7 (Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening (APCS) score). Three tiers of risk were arbitrarily defined: 0-1 'average risk' (AR); 2-3 'moderate risk' (MR); and 4-7 'high risk' (HR). Subjects undergoing screening (...) The Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening score: a validated tool that stratifies risk for colorectal advanced neoplasia in asymptomatic Asian subjects To develop and validate a clinical risk score predictive of risk for colorectal advanced neoplasia for Asia.A prospective, cross-sectional and multicentre study was carried out in tertiary hospitals in 11 Asian cities. The subjects comprise 2752 asymptomatic patients undergoing screening colonoscopy. From a development set of 860 asymptomatic

2011 EvidenceUpdates

133. Sex-specific prevalence of adenomas, advanced adenomas, and colorectal cancer in individuals undergoing screening colonoscopy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Sex-specific prevalence of adenomas, advanced adenomas, and colorectal cancer in individuals undergoing screening colonoscopy. Although some studies have shown that men are at greater age-specific risk for advanced colorectal neoplasia than women, the age for referring patients to screening colonoscopy is independent of sex and usually recommended to be 50 years.To determine and compare the prevalence and number needed to screen (NNS) for adenomas, advanced adenomas (AAs), and colorectal (...) carcinomas (CRCs) for different age groups in men and women.Cohort study of 44,350 participants in a national screening colonoscopy program over a 4-year period (2007 to 2010) in Austria.Prevalence and NNS of adenomas, AAs, and CRCs in different age groups for men and women.The median ages were 60.7 years (interquartile range [IQR], 54.5-67.5 years) for women and 60.6 years (IQR, 54.3-67.6 years) for men, and the sex ratio was nearly identical (51.0% [22,598] vs 49.0% [21,572]). Adenomas were found

2011 JAMA

134. The impact of CT colonography for colorectal cancer screening on the UK NHS: costs, healthcare resources and health outcomes

The impact of CT colonography for colorectal cancer screening on the UK NHS: costs, healthcare resources and health outcomes The impact of CT colonography for colorectal cancer screening on the UK NHS: costs, healthcare resources and health outcomes The impact of CT colonography for colorectal cancer screening on the UK NHS: costs, healthcare resources and health outcomes Sweet A, Lee D, Gairy K, Phiri D, Reason T, Lock K Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation (...) that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary The aim was to assess the budget impact and health care outcomes of adding computed tomography (CT) colonography to faecal occult blood testing (FOBT) to screen for colorectal cancer, in individuals aged 50 years or older. Adding CT colonography, to triage

2011 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

135. Costs and cost-effectiveness of full implementation of a biennial faecal occult blood test screening program for bowel cancer in Australia

Costs and cost-effectiveness of full implementation of a biennial faecal occult blood test screening program for bowel cancer in Australia Costs and cost-effectiveness of full implementation of a biennial faecal occult blood test screening program for bowel cancer in Australia Costs and cost-effectiveness of full implementation of a biennial faecal occult blood test screening program for bowel cancer in Australia Pignone MP, Flitcroft KL, Howard K, Trevena LJ, Salkeld GP, St John DJ Record (...) Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary This study examined the cost-effectiveness of full implementation of biennial colorectal cancer screening for individuals aged 50 to 74 years, using the faecal occult blood test. The authors

2011 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

136. Colorectal cancer screening comparing no screening, immunochemical and guaiac fecal occult blood tests: a cost-effectiveness analysis

Colorectal cancer screening comparing no screening, immunochemical and guaiac fecal occult blood tests: a cost-effectiveness analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2011 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

137. Colorectal cancer screening among ethnically diverse, low-income patients: a randomized controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Colorectal cancer screening among ethnically diverse, low-income patients: a randomized controlled trial. Patient navigators may increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates among adults in underserved communities, but prior randomized trials have been small or conducted at single sites and have not included substantial numbers of Haitian Creole-speaking or Portuguese-speaking patients.We identified 465 primary care patients from 4 community health centers and 2 public hospital-based (...) a language-concordant navigator. The navigators offered patients the option of being screened by fecal occult blood testing or colonoscopy. The primary outcome was completion of any CRC screening within 1 year. Secondary outcomes included the proportions of patients screened by colonoscopy who had adenomas or cancer detected.During a 1-year period, intervention patients were more likely to undergo CRC screening than control patients (33.6% vs 20.0%; P < .001), to be screened by colonoscopy (26.4% vs 13.0

2011 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

138. Electronic patient messages to promote colorectal cancer screening: a randomized controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Electronic patient messages to promote colorectal cancer screening: a randomized controlled trial Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality, yet effective screening tests are often underused. Electronic patient messages and personalized risk assessments delivered via an electronic personal health record could increase screening rates.We conducted a randomized controlled trial in 14 ambulatory health centers involving 1103 patients ranging in age from 50 to 75 years with an active (...) electronic personal health record who were overdue for colorectal cancer screening. Patients were randomly assigned to receive a single electronic message highlighting overdue screening status with a link to a Web-based tool to assess their personal risk of colorectal cancer. The outcomes included colorectal cancer screening rates at 1 and 4 months.Screening rates were higher at 1 month for patients who received electronic messages than for those who did not (8.3% vs 0.2%, P < .001), but this difference

2011 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

139. Patient outreach to promote colorectal cancer screening among patients with an expired order for colonoscopy: a randomized controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

in a large general internal medicine practice. Participants included 628 patients aged 50 to 79 years with an expired order for screening colonoscopy. Patients were stratified based on receipt of any previous colorectal cancer screening and randomly assigned either to (1) an intervention group that received a mailing containing a reminder letter from their primary care physician, a brochure and digital video disc about colorectal cancer and colorectal cancer screening, and a follow-up telephone call (...) Patient outreach to promote colorectal cancer screening among patients with an expired order for colonoscopy: a randomized controlled trial Targeted interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening among specific populations could increase screening rates. Patients with an expired order for screening colonoscopy might be persuaded to follow through with screening by such an intervention.We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a combined reminder/outreach intervention among patients

2011 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

140. Cost-effectiveness analysis of colorectal cancer screening methods in Iran

Cost-effectiveness analysis of colorectal cancer screening methods in Iran Cost-effectiveness analysis of colorectal cancer screening methods in Iran Cost-effectiveness analysis of colorectal cancer screening methods in Iran Allameh Z, Davari M, Emami MH Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment (...) on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary The aim was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of four methods of screening for colorectal cancer, for healthy people aged 45 to 65 years, in Iran. The authors concluded that flexible sigmoidoscopy was the most cost-effective method, for the public sector, and faecal occult blood testing was most cost-effective, for the private sector, in Iran. The methods and results were poorly reported. The authors’ conclusions are hard to assess

2011 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.