Latest & greatest articles for colon cancer screening

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Top results for colon cancer screening

21. Improving Internal Medicine Residents’ Colorectal Cancer Screening Knowledge Using a Smartphone App: Pilot Study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Improving Internal Medicine Residents’ Colorectal Cancer Screening Knowledge Using a Smartphone App: Pilot Study Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. About one in three adults in the United States is not getting the CRC screening as recommended. Internal medicine residents are deficient in CRC screening knowledge.The objective of our study was to assess the improvement in internal medicine residents (...) ' CRC screening knowledge via a pilot approach using a smartphone app.We designed a questionnaire based on the CRC screening guidelines of the American Cancer Society, American College of Gastroenterology, and US Preventive Services Task Force. We emailed the questionnaire via a SurveyMonkey link to all the residents of an internal medicine department to assess their knowledge of CRC screening guidelines. Then we designed an educational intervention in the form of a smartphone app containing all

2018 JMIR medical education

22. Revised Australian national guidelines for colorectal cancer screening: family history

Revised Australian national guidelines for colorectal cancer screening: family history Revised Australian national guidelines for colorectal cancer screening: family history | The Medical Journal of Australia mja-search search Use the for more specific terms. Title contains Body contains Date range from Date range to Article type Author's surname Volume First page doi: 10.5694/mja__.______ Search Reset  close Individual Login Purchase options Connect person_outline Login keyboard_arrow_down (...) Individual Login Purchase options menu search Advertisement close Revised Australian national guidelines for colorectal cancer screening: family history Mark A Jenkins, Driss Ait Ouakrim, Alex Boussioutas, John L Hopper, Hooi C Ee, Jon D Emery, Finlay A Macrae, Albert Chetcuti, Laura Wuellner and D James B St John Med J Aust 2018; 209 (10): . || doi: 10.5694/mja18.00142 Published online: 29 October 2018 Topics Abstract Introduction: Screening is an effective means for colorectal cancer prevention

2018 MJA Clinical Guidelines

23. Colorectal cancer screening in persons with a relevant family history - Update to commission S11-01

in Health Care (IQWiG) - ii - IQWiG employees ? Mareike Kracht ? Tatjana Hermanns ? Julia Kreis ? Fabian Lotz ? Christoph Mosch ? Ulrike Paschen Keywords: Early Detection of Cancer, Mass Screening, Colorectal Neoplasms, Family History, Benefit Assessment, Systematic Review Extract of rapid report S17-01 Version 1.0 Colorectal cancer screening in persons with a family history – update 24 April 2018 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) - iii - Key statement Research question (...) Colorectal cancer screening in persons with a relevant family history - Update to commission S11-01 1 Translation of the key statement of the rapid report S17-01 Darmkrebsfrüherkennung bei Personen unter 55 Jahren mit familiärem Risiko – Aktualisierung (Version 1.0; Status: 24 April 2018). Please note: This document was translated by an external translator and is provided as a service by IQWiG to English-language readers. However, solely the German original text is absolutely authoritative

2018 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare (IQWiG)

24. Novel Stool-Based Protein Biomarkers for Improved Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Case-Control Study. (Abstract)

Novel Stool-Based Protein Biomarkers for Improved Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Case-Control Study. The fecal immunochemical test (FIT) for detecting hemoglobin is used widely for noninvasive colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, but its sensitivity leaves room for improvement.To identify novel protein biomarkers in stool that outperform or complement hemoglobin in detecting CRC and advanced adenomas.Case-control study.Colonoscopy-controlled referral population from several centers.315 stool (...) samples from one series of 12 patients with CRC and 10 persons without colorectal neoplasia (control samples) and a second series of 81 patients with CRC, 40 with advanced adenomas, and 43 with nonadvanced adenomas, as well as 129 persons without colorectal neoplasia (control samples); 72 FIT samples from a third independent series of 14 patients with CRC, 16 with advanced adenomas, and 18 with nonadvanced adenomas, as well as 24 persons without colorectal neoplasia (control samples).Stool samples

2017 Annals of Internal Medicine

25. Colorectal Cancer Screening: What Is the Population's Opinion Full Text available with Trip Pro

age 54.6 years; 61.4% women; 22.1% had a family history of colorectal cancer. The main risk factors mentioned by the respondents were family history of CRC, previous history of intestinal polyps, and intestinal infection. Screening was considered useful by all respondents. About 60% of the respondents had been counselled, at least, on one screening technique, mainly by their general practitioner: colonoscopy in 31, fecal occult blood test in 44, and flexible sigmoidoscopy in 9. Most (...) Colorectal Cancer Screening: What Is the Population's Opinion Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the first cause of death by cancer in Portugal and mortality has been increasing in the last 30 years.During a raising awareness campaign performed by our Gastroenterology Department, in Setúbal, Portugal, an anonymous written questionnaire was developed and presented in order to evaluate the population's knowledge and attitude regarding CRC screening.The following results were reported: 140 persons; mean

2017 GE Portuguese journal of gastroenterology

26. Screening for Colorectal Cancer With Fecal Immunochemical Testing With and Without Postpolypectomy Surveillance Colonoscopy: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. (Abstract)

Screening for Colorectal Cancer With Fecal Immunochemical Testing With and Without Postpolypectomy Surveillance Colonoscopy: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. Population-based screening to prevent colorectal cancer (CRC) death is effective, but the effectiveness of postpolypectomy surveillance is unclear.To evaluate the additional benefit in terms of cost-effectiveness of colonoscopy surveillance in a screening setting.Microsimulation using the ASCCA (Adenoma and Serrated pathway to Colorectal (...) CAncer) model.Dutch CRC screening program and published literature.Asymptomatic persons aged 55 to 75 years without a prior CRC diagnosis.Lifetime.Health care payer.Fecal immunochemical test (FIT) screening with colonoscopy surveillance performed according to the Dutch guideline was simulated. The comparator was no screening or surveillance. FIT screening without colonoscopy surveillance and the effect of extending surveillance intervals were also evaluated.CRC burden, colonoscopy demand, life-years

2017 Annals of Internal Medicine

27. Patient navigation to reduce social inequalities in colorectal cancer screening participation: A cluster randomized controlled trial (Abstract)

Patient navigation to reduce social inequalities in colorectal cancer screening participation: A cluster randomized controlled trial Despite free colorectal cancer screening in France, participation remains low and low socioeconomic status is associated with a low participation. Our aim was to assess the effect of a screening navigation program on participation and the reduction in social inequalities in a national-level organized mass screening program for colorectal cancer by fecal-occult (...) with a phone number available defined as the navigable population. A screening navigator was added to the usual screening organization to identify and eliminate barriers to CRC screening with personalized contact. The participation rate by strata increased in the intervention arm. The increase was greater in affluent strata than in deprived ones. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that the intervention mainly with phone navigation increased individual participation (OR=1.19 [1.10, 1.29]) in the navigable

2017 EvidenceUpdates

28. Effect of Physician Notification Regarding Nonadherence to Colorectal Cancer Screening on Patient Participation in Fecal Immunochemical Test Cancer Screening: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Physician Notification Regarding Nonadherence to Colorectal Cancer Screening on Patient Participation in Fecal Immunochemical Test Cancer Screening: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Increasing participation in fecal screening tests is a major challenge in countries that have implemented colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programs.To determine whether providing general practitioners (GPs) a list of patients who are nonadherent to CRC screening enhances patient participation in fecal (...) immunochemical testing (FIT).A 3-group, cluster-randomized study was conducted from July 14, 2015, to July 14, 2016, on the west coast of France, with GPs in 801 practices participating and involving adult patients (50-74 years) who were at average risk of CRC and not up-to-date with CRC screening. The final follow-up date was July 14, 2016.General practitioners were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: 496 received a list of patients who had not undergone CRC screening (patient-specific reminders group

2017 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

29. Effect of Colonoscopy Outreach vs Fecal Immunochemical Test Outreach on Colorectal Cancer Screening Completion: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Colonoscopy Outreach vs Fecal Immunochemical Test Outreach on Colorectal Cancer Screening Completion: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Mailed fecal immunochemical test (FIT) outreach is more effective than colonoscopy outreach for increasing 1-time colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, but long-term effectiveness may need repeat testing and timely follow-up for abnormal results.Compare the effectiveness of FIT outreach and colonoscopy outreach to increase completion of the CRC screening (...) for individuals in the FIT outreach group with normal results and completion of diagnostic and screening colonoscopy for those with an abnormal FIT result or assigned to colonoscopy outreach.Primary outcome was screening process completion, defined as adherence to colonoscopy completion, annual testing for a normal FIT result, diagnostic colonoscopy for an abnormal FIT result, or treatment evaluation if CRC was detected. Secondary outcomes included detection of any adenoma or advanced neoplasia (including CRC

2017 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

30. Time to Diagnostic Testing After a Positive Colorectal Cancer Screening Test Full Text available with Trip Pro

TR Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland. eng U54 CA163262 CA NCI NIH HHS United States Letter Comment United States JAMA 7501160 0098-7484 AIM IM JAMA. 2017 Apr 25;317(16):1627-1628 28444260 JAMA. 2017 Aug 1;318(5):483-484 28763547 Colonoscopy Colorectal Neoplasms Early Detection of Cancer Humans Mass Screening Occult Blood 2017 8 2 6 0 2017 8 2 6 0 2017 9 8 6 0 ppublish 28763543 2646711 10.1001/jama.2017.9312 PMC6197858 NIHMS988941 J Comp Eff Res. 2015 Nov;4(6 (...) Time to Diagnostic Testing After a Positive Colorectal Cancer Screening Test 28763543 2017 09 07 2018 11 13 1538-3598 318 5 2017 08 01 JAMA JAMA Time to Diagnostic Testing After a Positive Colorectal Cancer Screening Test. 483 10.1001/jama.2017.9312 Doubeni Chyke A CA Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia. Corley Douglas A DA Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland. Levin Theodore R

2017 JAMA

31. Another brick in the large wall against colorectal cancer: a commentary on effectiveness of screening colonoscopy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Another brick in the large wall against colorectal cancer: a commentary on effectiveness of screening colonoscopy 28713863 2018 11 13 2415-1289 2 2017 Translational gastroenterology and hepatology Transl Gastroenterol Hepatol Another brick in the large wall against colorectal cancer: a commentary on effectiveness of screening colonoscopy. 59 10.21037/tgh.2017.06.02 Glazer Yair Y Department of Surgery A, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer Sheva, Israel. Perry Zvi H ZH Department of Surgery (...) A, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer Sheva, Israel. Department of Epidemiology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. Avital Itzhak I Department of Surgery A, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer Sheva, Israel. Soroka University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Beer-Sheva, Israel. Department of Healthcare Sciences, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, Israel. eng Editorial Comment 2017 06 30 China Transl Gastroenterol Hepatol 101683450 2415-1289 Gut. 2016 Oct 12;: 27733426 Conflicts

2017 Translational gastroenterology and hepatology

32. Effect of Combined Patient Decision Aid and Patient Navigation vs Usual Care for Colorectal Cancer Screening in a Vulnerable Patient Population: A Randomized Clinical Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Combined Patient Decision Aid and Patient Navigation vs Usual Care for Colorectal Cancer Screening in a Vulnerable Patient Population: A Randomized Clinical Trial Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is underused, especially among vulnerable populations. Decision aids and patient navigation are potentially complementary interventions for improving CRC screening rates, but their combined effect on screening completion is unknown.To determine the combined effect of a CRC screening decision (...) aid and patient navigation compared with usual care on CRC screening completion.In this randomized clinical trial, data were collected from January 2014 to March 2016 at 2 community health center practices, 1 in North Carolina and 1 in New Mexico, serving vulnerable populations. Patients ages 50 to 75 years who had average CRC risk, spoke English or Spanish, were not current with recommended CRC screening, and were attending primary care visits were recruited and randomized 1:1 to intervention

2017 EvidenceUpdates

33. Recommendations on Fecal Immunochemical Testing to Screen for Colorectal Neoplasia: A Consensus Statement by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer Full Text available with Trip Pro

Recommendations on Fecal Immunochemical Testing to Screen for Colorectal Neoplasia: A Consensus Statement by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer The use of the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is supported by randomized trials demonstrating effectiveness in cancer prevention and widely recommended by guidelines for this purpose. The fecal immunochemical test (FIT), as a direct measure of human hemoglobin in stool has a number of advantages (...) relative to conventional FOBT and is increasingly used relative to that test. This review summarizes current evidence for FIT in colorectal neoplasia detection and the comparative effectiveness of FIT relative to other commonly used CRC screening modalities. Based on evidence, guidance statements on FIT application were developed and quality metrics for program implementation proposed.Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute, American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society for Gastrointestinal

2017 EvidenceUpdates

34. Predictors of primary care provider adoption of CT colonography for colorectal cancer screening Full Text available with Trip Pro

Predictors of primary care provider adoption of CT colonography for colorectal cancer screening To examine factors influencing primary care provider (PCP) adoption of CT colonography (CTC) for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening.We performed a retrospective cohort study linking electronic health record (EHR) data with PCP survey data. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they were not up-to-date with CRC screening and if they had CTC insurance coverage in the year prior to survey (...) administration. PCPs were included if they had at least one eligible patient in their panel and completed the survey (final sample N = 95 PCPs; N = 6245 patients). Survey data included perceptions of CRC screening by any method, as well as CTC specifically. Multivariate logistic regression estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for PCP and clinic predictors of CRC screening by any method and screening with CTC.Substantial variation in CTC use was seen among PCPs and clinics (range 0-16% of CRC

2017 Abdominal radiology (New York)

35. The necessity of colorectal cancer screening for elderly patients Full Text available with Trip Pro

The necessity of colorectal cancer screening for elderly patients 28447054 2018 11 13 2415-1289 2 2017 Translational gastroenterology and hepatology Transl Gastroenterol Hepatol The necessity of colorectal cancer screening for elderly patients. 19 10.21037/tgh.2017.03.03 Kudo Shin-Ei SE Digestive Disease Center, Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, Yokohama, Japan. Kudo Toyoki T Digestive Disease Center, Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, Yokohama, Japan. eng Editorial Comment

2017 Translational gastroenterology and hepatology

36. What is the optimal colorectal cancer screening program for an average-risk population? Full Text available with Trip Pro

What is the optimal colorectal cancer screening program for an average-risk population? 28447052 2018 11 13 2415-1289 2 2017 Translational gastroenterology and hepatology Transl Gastroenterol Hepatol What is the optimal colorectal cancer screening program for an average-risk population? 17 10.21037/tgh.2017.03.05 Sekiguchi Masau M Cancer Screening Center, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Endoscopy Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Division of Screening (...) Technology, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan. Matsuda Takahisa T Cancer Screening Center, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Endoscopy Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Division of Screening Technology, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan. Saito Yutaka Y Endoscopy Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. eng Editorial Comment 2017 03 16 China Transl Gastroenterol Hepatol 101683450

2017 Translational gastroenterology and hepatology

37. Social networks as predictors of colorectal cancer screening in African Americans. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Social networks as predictors of colorectal cancer screening in African Americans. Early detection can reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality by 15%-33%, and screening is widely recommended for average-risk adults beginning at age 50 years. Colorectal cancer mortality rates are higher in African Americans than in whites, while screening rates are somewhat lower. Individual social networks can reduce emotional and/or logistical barriers to health-promoting but distasteful procedures (...) diversity and a large number of people in social networks may enhance CRC screening rates among African Americans.

2017 Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association Controlled trial quality: uncertain

38. Colorectal Cancer Screening

E, Castells A, Bujanda L, et al. Colonoscopy versus fecal immunochemical testing in colorectal- cancer screening. N Engl J Med. 2012 Feb 23; 366(8):697-706. Redwood DG, Asay ED, Blake ID et al. Stool DNA Testing for Screening Detection of Colorectal Neoplasia in Alaska Native People. Mayo Clin Proc. 2016 Jan; 91(1):61-70. Rosty C, Hewett DG, Brown IS, Leggett BA, Whitehall VL. Serrated polyps of the large intestine: current understanding of diagnosis, pathogenesis, and clinical management. J (...) deaths in the United States. There is good evidence that CRC-related morbidity and mortality can be reduced through early detection and treatment of early-stage disease and through the identification and removal of adenomas, the precursor of colorectal cancers. Definitions: Neoplastic Colorectal Polyps and Adenomas Adenomatous polyps (also called adenomas) are growths with malignant potential, and are the most common type of colorectal polyp. Adenomatous polyps may be pathologically classified

2017 Kaiser Permanente Clinical Guidelines