Latest & greatest articles for colon cancer screening

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Top results for colon cancer screening

181. CT colonography (virtual colonoscopy) for colon cancer screening

included comments from the principal investigator of the trial citing the importance of adequate training and credentialing of CT colonography readers for the effectiveness of the technique. This suggests the need to credential providers who perform this procedure, at least in the initial phase of dissemination. The 2008 guideline on colon cancer screening, a joint guideline of the American Cancer Society, the U.S. Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology (...) for CT colonography to be an effective screening test. Based on the above, CT colonography for the purpose of colon cancer screening meets the TEC criteria. Project page URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Blue Cross Blue Shield Insurance Plans; Colonic Neoplasms /diagnosis /radiography; Colonic Polyps /diagnosis /radiography; Colonography, Computed Tomographic /methods; Colonoscopy; Device Approvals; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Technology Assessment, Biomedical; United

2009 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

182. Fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening: a systematic review of accuracy and compliance

Fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening: a systematic review of accuracy and compliance Fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening of average risk individuals: a systematic review of accuracy and compliance Fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening of average risk individuals: a systematic review of accuracy and compliance Mujoomdar M, Cimon K, Spry C Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from (...) a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Mujoomdar M, Cimon K, Spry C. Fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening of average risk individuals: a systematic review of accuracy and compliance . Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). 2009 Authors' objectives To review the evidence on diagnostic accuracy and patient compliance when using fecal immunochemical tests to screen for colorectal

2009 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

183. Fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening: a systematic review of accuracy and compliance

to deciding if FIT is an appropriate CRC screening tool. Project page URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Colorectal Neoplasms; Early Detection of Cancers; Immunologic Tests; Mass Screening; Occult Blood; Predictive Value of Tests Language Published English Country of organisation Canada Province or state Ontario Address for correspondence Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health, 865 Carling Avenue, Suite 600, K1S 5S8 Ottawa, Ontario Canada Email: htainfo@cadth.ca (...) Fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening: a systematic review of accuracy and compliance Fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening: a systematic review of accuracy and compliance Fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening: a systematic review of accuracy and compliance Mujoomdar M, Cimon K, Spry C Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality

2009 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

184. Fecal immunochemical testing in colorectal cancer screening of average risk individuals: economic evaluation

was associated with a cost per QALY of $4,350, which was robust to sensitivity analysis. If jurisdictions implement screening programs using FIT, volume-based contracts could be used to achieve lower prices for the FIT assays. To optimize FIT test performance, programs could include the testing of two to three stool samples. Project page URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Colorectal Neoplasms; Early Detection of Cancer; Fecess; Mass Screening; Occult Blood Language Published English (...) Fecal immunochemical testing in colorectal cancer screening of average risk individuals: economic evaluation Fecal immunochemical testing in colorectal cancer screening of average risk individuals: economic evaluation Fecal immunochemical testing in colorectal cancer screening of average risk individuals: economic evaluation Heitman S, Au F, Hilsden R, Manns B Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation

2009 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

185. Risk of colorectal cancer seven years after flexible sigmoidoscopy screening: randomised controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Risk of colorectal cancer seven years after flexible sigmoidoscopy screening: randomised controlled trial. To determine the risk of colorectal cancer after screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy.Randomised controlled trial.Population based screening in two areas in Norway-city of Oslo and Telemark county (urban and mixed urban and rural populations).55 736 men and women aged 55-64 years.Once only flexible sigmoidoscopy screening with or without a single round of faecal occult blood testing (n=13 (...) 823) compared with no screening (n=41 913).Planned end points were cumulative incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer after 5, 10, and 15 years. This first report from the study presents cumulative incidence after 7 years of follow-up and hazard ratio for mortality after 6 years.No difference was found in the 7 year cumulative incidence of colorectal cancer between the screening and control groups (134.5 v 131.9 cases per 100 000 person years). In intention to screen analysis, a trend towards

2009 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

186. Evaluating test strategies for colorectal cancer screening - age to begin, age to stop, and timing of screening intervals: a decision analysis of colorectal cancer screening for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force from the Cancer Intervention and Surv

Evaluating test strategies for colorectal cancer screening - age to begin, age to stop, and timing of screening intervals: a decision analysis of colorectal cancer screening for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force from the Cancer Intervention and Surv Evaluating test strategies for colorectal cancer screening - age to begin, age to stop, and timing of screening intervals: a decision analysis of colorectal cancer screening for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force from the Cancer (...) Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET). Evaluating test strategies for colorectal cancer screening - age to begin, age to stop, and timing of screening intervals: a decision analysis of colorectal cancer screening for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force from the Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET). Lansdorp-Vogelaar I, Knudsen AB, Wilschut J, van Ballegooijen M, Kuntz KM Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment

2009 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

187. CT colonography to screen for colorectal cancer and aortic aneurysm in the Medicare population: cost-effectiveness analysis

the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary The objective was to assess the cost-effectiveness of computed tomography colonography (CTC) screening for colorectal cancer and abdominal aortic aneurysms. The authors concluded that CTC was a highly cost-effective screening strategy. The methods were adequate, but could (...) have been reported in more detail, particularly for the cost calculations. Assuming that the best clinical evidence was used, the conclusions appear to be valid. Type of economic evaluation Cost-effectiveness analysis Study objective The objective was to assess the cost-effectiveness of computed tomography colonography (CTC) screening for colorectal cancer and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in a Medicare population. Interventions The interventions were no screening; CTC screening every five years

2009 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

188. Costs and cost effectiveness of a health care provider-directed intervention to promote colorectal cancer screening

Costs and cost effectiveness of a health care provider-directed intervention to promote colorectal cancer screening Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

189. Stool DNA and occult blood testing for screen detection of colorectal neoplasia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Stool DNA and occult blood testing for screen detection of colorectal neoplasia. Stool DNA testing is a new approach to colorectal cancer detection. Few data are available from the screening setting.To compare stool DNA and fecal blood testing for detection of screen-relevant neoplasia (curable-stage cancer, high-grade dysplasia, or adenomas >1 cm).Blinded, multicenter, cross-sectional study.Communities surrounding 22 participating academic and regional health care systems in the United States (...) for screen-relevant neoplasms was 20% by SDT-1, 11% by Hemoccult (P = 0.020), 21% by HemoccultSensa (P = 0.80); sensitivity for cancer plus high-grade dysplasia did not differ among tests. Specificity was 96% by SDT-1, compared with 98% by Hemoccult (P < 0.001) and 97% by HemoccultSensa (P = 0.20). Stool DNA test 2 detected 46% of screen-relevant neoplasms, compared with 16% by Hemoccult (P < 0.001) and 24% by HemoccultSensa (P < 0.001). Stool DNA test 2 detected 46% of adenomas 1 cm or larger, compared

2008 Annals of Internal Medicine

190. Screening for Colorectal Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. (Abstract)

Screening for Colorectal Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Update of the 2002 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for colorectal cancer.To update its recommendation, the USPSTF commissioned 2 studies: 1) a targeted systematic evidence review on 4 selected questions relating to test characteristics and benefits and harms of screening technologies, and 2) a decision analytic modeling analysis using population (...) modeling techniques to compare the expected health outcomes and resource requirements of available screening modalities when used in a programmatic way over time.The USPSTF recommends screening for colorectal cancer using fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy in adults, beginning at age 50 years and continuing until age 75 years. The risks and benefits of these screening methods vary. (A recommendation). The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for colorectal cancer in adults

2008 Annals of Internal Medicine

191. Evaluating Test Strategies for Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Decision Analysis for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Evaluating Test Strategies for Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Decision Analysis for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force requested a decision analysis to inform their update of recommendations for colorectal cancer screening.To assess life-years gained and colonoscopy requirements for colorectal cancer screening strategies and identify a set of recommendable screening strategies.Decision analysis using 2 colorectal cancer microsimulation models from (...) SENSA testing. Annual Hemoccult II and flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years alone were less effective.The results were most sensitive to beginning screening at age 40 years.The stop age for screening was based only on chronologic age.The findings support colorectal cancer screening with the following: colonoscopy every 10 years, annual screening with a sensitive FOBT, or flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years with a midinterval sensitive FOBT from age 50 to 75 years.

2008 Annals of Internal Medicine

192. Prevention and screening of colorectal cancer.

Prevention and screening of colorectal cancer. Guidelines and Measures | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality HHS.gov Search ahrq.gov Search ahrq.gov Menu Topics A - Z Healthcare Delivery Latest available findings on quality of and access to health care Searchable database of AHRQ Grants, Working Papers & HHS Recovery Act Projects AHRQ Projects funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund You are here Guidelines and Measures Funding for the National Guideline Clearinghouse

2008 Finnish Medical Society Duodecim

193. Review: colorectal cancer screening with the faecal occult blood test reduced colorectal cancer mortality

Review: colorectal cancer screening with the faecal occult blood test reduced colorectal cancer mortality Review: colorectal cancer screening with the faecal occult blood test reduced colorectal cancer mortality | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: colorectal cancer screening with the faecal occult blood test reduced colorectal cancer mortality Article Text Treatment Review: colorectal cancer screening with the faecal

2008 Evidence-Based Nursing

194. Five-year risk of colorectal neoplasia after negative screening colonoscopy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

adenoma (relative risk, 3.31; 95% CI, 1.02 to 10.8).Among persons with no colorectal neoplasia on initial screening colonoscopy, the 5-year risk of colorectal cancer is extremely low. The risk of advanced adenoma is also low, although it is higher among men than among women. Our findings support a rescreening interval of 5 years or longer after a normal colonoscopic examination.2008 Massachusetts Medical Society (...) Five-year risk of colorectal neoplasia after negative screening colonoscopy. The appropriate interval for endoscopic rescreening after a negative colonoscopic examination is uncertain.We identified persons with no adenomas on baseline screening colonoscopy who returned at 5 years for follow-up colonoscopy. Findings were categorized according to the most advanced lesion present: no polyp, a hyperplastic polyp, a tubular adenoma less than 1 cm in diameter, an advanced adenoma (a tubular adenoma

2008 NEJM

195. Survival benefit in a randomized clinical trial of faecal occult blood screening for colorectal cancer (Abstract)

Survival benefit in a randomized clinical trial of faecal occult blood screening for colorectal cancer Early detection of colorectal cancer could reduce cancer-specific mortality. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effect of faecal occult blood test (FOBT) screening on colorectal cancer mortality in a Swedish population.All 68,308 citizens in Göteborg born between 1918 and 1931 were randomized to a screening or a control group at the age of 60-64 years. All were screened two to three (...) times with rehydrated Hemoccult-II. Compliance was 70.0 per cent (23,916 individuals). Those with a positive test result were offered sigmoidoscopy and a double-contrast enema. The primary endpoint was death from colorectal cancer.After a mean of 9 years from the last screening, there was a significant reduction in colorectal cancer mortality in the screening group compared with the control group. The overall risk ratio of death from colorectal cancer was 0.84 (95 per cent confidence interval 0.71

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

196. Comparison of an established simple office-based immunological FOBT with fecal tumor pyruvate kinase type M2 (M2-PK) for colorectal cancer screening: prospective multicenter study (Abstract)

Comparison of an established simple office-based immunological FOBT with fecal tumor pyruvate kinase type M2 (M2-PK) for colorectal cancer screening: prospective multicenter study The immunological fecal occult blood test (IFOBT) has established itself as a more precise marker for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening than traditional guaiac-based FOBT. The simpler, cheaper, and more convenient newer office-based IFOBTs have been validated for diagnosing CRC. Dimeric isoenzyme of pyruvate kinase (...) , M2-PK, expressed by tumor cells, has as well been proposed as a screening tool for CRC. This is the first study comparing fecal M2-PK as a screening biomarker for CRC against previously evaluated office-based IFOBT and colonoscopy.Six hundred forty consecutive subjects (symptomatic, as well as for CRC screening) referred for colonoscopy for various indications across five centers in Germany provided the stool samples for performing M2-PK and an immunochemical FOB strip test. The IFOBT used

2008 EvidenceUpdates

197. Colorectal cancer screening.

Colorectal cancer screening. Guidelines and Measures | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality HHS.gov Search ahrq.gov Search ahrq.gov Menu Topics A - Z Healthcare Delivery Latest available findings on quality of and access to health care Searchable database of AHRQ Grants, Working Papers & HHS Recovery Act Projects AHRQ Projects funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund You are here Guidelines and Measures Funding for the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) has ended

2008 World Gastroenterology Organisation

198. [Cost-effectiveness analysis of population screening tests for colorectal cancer: systematic review of the efficacy and safety]

a greater reduction in CRC mortality compared to either modality alone.Based on the current evidence, CTC cannot be proposed for colorectal cancer screening in average risk population. Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Colorectal Neoplasms; Cost-Benefit Analysiss; Mass Screening Language Published Spanish Country of organisation Spain English summary An English language summary is available. English Summary English summary available Address for correspondence (...) [Cost-effectiveness analysis of population screening tests for colorectal cancer: systematic review of the efficacy and safety] Analisis coste-efectividad del cribado de cancer colorrectal en poblacion general. Revision sistematica sobre su eficacia y seguridad [Cost-effectiveness analysis of population screening tests for colorectal cancer: systematic review of the efficacy and safety] Analisis coste-efectividad del cribado de cancer colorrectal en poblacion general. Revision sistematica sobre

2008 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

199. Screening colonoscopy for colorectal cancer in asymptomatic people: a meta-analysis

Screening colonoscopy for colorectal cancer in asymptomatic people: a meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 DARE.

200. Screening for colorectal cancer: a targeted, updated systematic review for the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force

Screening for colorectal cancer: a targeted, updated systematic review for the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force Screening for colorectal cancer: a targeted, updated systematic review for the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force Screening for colorectal cancer: a targeted, updated systematic review for the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force Whitlock E P, Lin J S, Liles E, Beil T L, Fu R CRD summary This review evaluated the screening accuracy and harms of colonoscopy and flexible (...) sigmoidoscopy for colorectal cancer in average-risk populations. The authors concluded that colonoscopy was sensitive in detecting larger lesions (over 10 mm), but had a higher risk for complications than flexible sigmoidoscopy. The conclusions are probably reliable, but under reporting of study quality may warrant a cautious interpretation. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness, diagnostic accuracy, and harms of colonoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy as screening methods for colorectal cancer

2008 DARE.