Latest & greatest articles for colon cancer screening

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Top results for colon cancer screening

1. Is 45 really the new 50 in colorectal cancer screening?

Is 45 really the new 50 in colorectal cancer screening? Tools for Practice is proudly sponsored by the Alberta College of Family Physicians (ACFP). ACFP is a provincial, professional voluntary organization, representing more than 4,800 family physicians, family medicine residents, and medical students in Alberta. Established over sixty years ago, the ACFP strives for excellence in family practice through advocacy, continuing medical education and primary care research. www.acfp.ca June 29, 2020 (...) Is 45 really the new 50 in colorectal cancer screening? Clinical Question: Should we lower the age that average risk patients commence colorectal cancer screening from 50 to 45? Bottom Line: In developed countries, the incidence of colorectal cancer in persons under 50 years old has increased by 20-30% in the last 20 years. However, the absolute risk increase is only 1-4 per 100,000 persons. Screening average risk patients under age 50 should not be encouraged at this time. Evidence: • Population

2020 Tools for Practice

2. Long-Term Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality After a Single Negative Screening Colonoscopy. (Abstract)

Long-Term Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality After a Single Negative Screening Colonoscopy. Current guidelines recommend a 10-year interval between screening colonoscopies, but evidence is limited.To assess the long-term risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) and death from CRC after a high- and low-quality single negative screening colonoscopy.Observational study.Polish Colonoscopy Screening Program.Average-risk individuals aged 50 to 66 years who had a single negative colonoscopy (...) (no neoplastic findings).Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of CRC after high- and low-quality single negative screening colonoscopy. High-quality colonoscopy included a complete examination, with adequate bowel preparation, performed by endoscopists with an adenoma detection rate of 20% or greater.Among 165 887 individuals followed for up to 17.4 years, CRC incidence (0.28 [95% CI, 0.25 to 0.30]) and mortality (0.19 [CI, 0.16 to 0.21]) were 72% and 81% lower

2020 Annals of Internal Medicine

3. Role of gastrointestinal endoscopy in the screening of digestive tract cancers in Europ

leadtounderuseorpoorresourcingofhealthfacilities involved inprovidingscreeningservices, with consequent failuretofully realizethe potential benefits to patients. Methods In 2017, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Governing Board established a task force (Public Affairs Working Group led by A.S.) to produce a Position Statement concerning the value of endoscopy for screening purposes in GI cancers. The most prevalent digestive cancers (esophageal squamous cellcarcinoma,esophagealadenocarcinoma,gastric carcinoma (...) relative with BEor esophageal adenocarcinoma [EAC]). – For pancreatic cancer screening, endoscopic ultra- sound may be used in selected high-risk patients such as those with a strong family history and/or genetic suscep- tibility. ABBREVIATIONS BE Barrett’sesophagus CT computed tomography EAC esophageal adenocarcinoma ESGE European Societyof Gastrointestinal Endoscopy EUS endoscopic ultrasound FIT fecal immunochemical testing FOBT fecal occult blood test GERD gastroesophageal reflux disease GI

2020 European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

4. Cancer Screening: Interventions Engaging Community Health Workers – Colorectal Cancer

or screening or "early detection of cancer").mp. 2. ((neoplasm* or ductal breast carcinoma* or "hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome") and (diagnosis or prevention)).mp. [mp=title, abstract, heading word, table of contents, key concepts, original title, tests & measures] 3. ((adenoma* or neoplasia or cancer* or neoplasm* or tumo?r* or carcinoma* or adenocarcinoma*) and (breast or cervical or cervix or colon or colorectal or crc)).mp. 4. 2 or 3 5. 1 and 4 6. ((colonography or colonoscopy (...) or screening).ti,ab. or "early detection of cancer"/ 20. (neoplasms/ or breast neoplasms/ or colorectal neoplasms/ or uterine cervical neoplasms/ or carcinoma, ductal, breast/ or "hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome"/ or inflammatory breast neoplasms/ or colonic neoplasms/ or rectal neoplasms/) and (di or pc).fs. 21. ((adenoma* or neoplasia or cancer* or neoplasm* or tumo?r* or carcinoma* or adenocarcinoma*) and (breast or cervical or cervix or colon or colorectal or crc)).ti,ab. 22. 20 or 21 23

2020 Community Preventive Services Task Force

5. Colorectal cancer screening with faecal immunochemical testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Have inflammatory bowel disease Have hereditary syndromes that increase the risk of colorectal cancer, such as Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis. Several factors influence individuals’ decisions whether to be screened, even when they are presented with the same information: Variation in an individual’s values and preferences A close balance of benefits versus harms and burdens (for example, for a baseline risk of 3%, FIT every two years results in five fewer deaths from colorectal (...) recommendations: an international comparison of high income countries . NHS. Bowel scope screening. . Navarro M , Nicolas A , Ferrandez A , Lanas A . Colorectal cancer population screening programs worldwide in 2016: An update . Levin TR , Corley DA , Jensen CD , et al . Effects of organized colorectal cancer screening on cancer incidence and mortality in a large community-based population . Cancer Research UK. Bowel cancer incidence statistics. . Danckert B FJ, Engholm G, Hansen HL, et al. NORDCAN: Cancer

2019 BMJ Rapid Recommendations

6. Screening for Colorectal Cancer in Asymptomatic Average-Risk Adults: A Guidance Statement From the American College of Physicians. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Screening for Colorectal Cancer in Asymptomatic Average-Risk Adults: A Guidance Statement From the American College of Physicians. The purpose of this guidance statement is to guide clinicians on colorectal cancer screening in average-risk adults.This guidance statement is derived from a critical appraisal of guidelines on screening for colorectal cancer in average-risk adults and the evidence presented in these guidelines. National guidelines published in English between 1 June 2014 and 28 May (...) should screen for colorectal cancer in average-risk adults between the ages of 50 and 75 years.Clinicians should select the colorectal cancer screening test with the patient on the basis of a discussion of benefits, harms, costs, availability, frequency, and patient preferences. Suggested screening tests and intervals are fecal immunochemical testing or high-sensitivity guaiac-based fecal occult blood testing every 2 years, colonoscopy every 10 years, or flexible sigmoidoscopy every 10 years plus

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

7. Bowel cancer screening: imaging use

screening: imaging use Information about imaging practice standards for bowel cancer screening of individuals unsuitable for a colonoscopy. Published 1 November 2012 Last updated 14 October 2019 — From: Documents Ref: PHE publications gateway number: GW-810 HTML Details This publication explains the use of whole colon imaging as an alternative to a colonoscopy as part of the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme ( 14 October 2019 Added new guidelines on CTC imaging in NHS bowel cancer screening. 1 (...) Bowel cancer screening: imaging use Bowel cancer screening: imaging use - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies which are essential for the site to work. We also use non-essential cookies to help us improve government digital services. Any data collected is anonymised. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Accept cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Register by 26 November to vote in the General Election on 12 December. Guidance Bowel cancer

2019 Public Health England

8. Colorectal cancer screening with faecal immunochemical testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy: a microsimulation modelling study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Colorectal cancer screening with faecal immunochemical testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy: a microsimulation modelling study. To estimate benefits and harms of different colorectal cancer screening strategies, stratified by (baseline) 15-year colorectal cancer risk.Microsimulation modelling study using MIcrosimulation SCreening ANalysis-Colon (MISCAN-Colon).A parallel guideline committee (BMJ Rapid Recommendations) defined the time frame and screening interventions, including selection (...) of outcome measures.Norwegian men and women aged 50-79 years with varying 15-year colorectal cancer risk (1-7%).Four screening strategies were compared with no screening: biennial or annual faecal immunochemical test (FIT) or single sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy at 100% adherence.Colorectal cancer mortality and incidence, burdens, and harms over 15 years of follow-up. The certainty of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach.Over 15 years of follow-up, screening individuals aged 50-79 at 3% risk

2019 BMJ

9. Colorectal Cancer Screening Evidence Brief

with a personal or family history of colorectal cancer or adenomatous polyps, persons with inflammatory bowel disease, and those with symptoms that may be attributable to colorectal. Background Recently, the American Cancer Society (ACS) released their updated 2018 Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Screening Guidelines. These guidelines added the qualified recommendation* that screening for average risk patients start at 45 years of age regardless of race. Screening all adults aged 50 years and older, which (...) fruits and vegetables, fiber, and calcium). Awareness Given the data that colorectal cancer is increasing in younger individuals we must be more vigilant for signs and symptoms that could indicate a problem. I want to know if you develop blood in your stools, anemia, abdominal pain, or changes in bowel habits. However, it is also important to realize that early colon cancers and precancerous polyps do not commonly cause symptoms. 5 References American Academy of Family Physicians Statement: https

2019 Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement

10. Towards risk-stratified colorectal cancer screening. Adding risk factors to the fecal immunochemical test: Evidence, evolution and expectations (Abstract)

Towards risk-stratified colorectal cancer screening. Adding risk factors to the fecal immunochemical test: Evidence, evolution and expectations With increasing incidence and mortality, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a growing health problem worldwide. An effective way to address CRC is by screening for fecal (occult) blood by the fecal immunochemical test (FIT). However, there is room for improvement since precursor lesions and CRC bleed intermittent and can therefore be missed by the FIT (false

2019 EvidenceUpdates

11. Eicosapentaenoic acid and/or aspirin for preventing colorectal adenomas during colonoscopic surveillance in the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme: the seAFOod RCT Full Text available with Trip Pro

Eicosapentaenoic acid and/or aspirin for preventing colorectal adenomas during colonoscopic surveillance in the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme: the seAFOod RCT Eicosapentaenoic acid and/or aspirin for preventing colorectal adenomas during colonoscopic surveillance in the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme: the seAFOod RCT Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could (...) not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} Neither eicosapentaenoic acid nor aspirin reduced the proportion of individuals with any colorectal adenoma recurrence during surveillance in the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , , & . Mark A Hull 1, * , Kirsty Sprange 2 , Trish Hepburn 2 , Wei

2019 NIHR HTA programme

12. Comparison of Universal Versus Age-Restricted Screening of Colorectal Tumors for Lynch Syndrome Using Mismatch Repair Immunohistochemistry: A Cohort Study. (Abstract)

Comparison of Universal Versus Age-Restricted Screening of Colorectal Tumors for Lynch Syndrome Using Mismatch Repair Immunohistochemistry: A Cohort Study. Guidelines recommend screening all patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer (CRC) for Lynch syndrome (LS). However, the efficiency of universal LS screening in elderly populations has not been well studied.To compare the performance of age-restricted and universal LS screening using reflex mismatch repair (MMR) immunohistochemistry (...) (IHC) of CRC tumors.Retrospective cohort study.A large, diverse, community-based health care system.3891 persons with newly diagnosed CRC who had LS screening between 2011 and 2016.Diagnostic yield of different LS screening strategies.Sixty-three LS cases (diagnostic yield, 1.62%) were identified by universal screening, with only 5 (7.9%) detected after age 70 years and 1 (1.6%) detected after age 80 years. When all patients with CRC who had universal screening were used as the denominator, 58 LS

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

13. Participation and Ease of Use in Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Comparison of 2 Fecal Immunochemical Tests (Abstract)

Participation and Ease of Use in Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Comparison of 2 Fecal Immunochemical Tests The impact of fecal immunochemical test (FIT)-based colorectal cancer (CRC) screening on disease incidence and mortality is affected by participation, which might be influenced by ease of use of the FIT. We compared the participation rates and ease of use of 2 different FITs in a CRC screening program.There were two study designs within the Dutch CRC screening program. In a paired cohort (...) but marginally considered easier to use than OC-Sensor, the number of analyzable tests and the participation rates in organized CRC screening are not affected when either of the FITs is implemented as a primary screening test.

2019 EvidenceUpdates

14. Screening for colorectal cancer-where does the fit-DNA test fit?

Preventive Services Task Force, Bibbins-Domingo K, Grossman DC, Curry SJ, et al. Screening for Colorectal Cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. JAMA. 2016;315(23):2564-2575. . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Health Interview Survey. Available at: . Published March 1, 2014. Accessed June 21, 2018. .National Cancer Institute. SEER Cancer Statistics Fact sheets: Colon and Rectum Cancer. Available at: .Published September, 2014. Accessed June 21, 2018 (...) will continue to improve, and blood tests for CRC are in development. Research and one blood test, Epi pro Colon, was approved by the FDA in 2016. However, it is not currently recommended by the USPSTF. As this area of research develops, it is important that physicians remain aware of all the currently available USPTSF-approved screening modalities. “One size fits all” may not be the most effective cancer screening approach for all patients. Studies have shown that colonoscopy may be avoided by large

2019 Clinical Correlations

15. Testing behavioral interventions to optimize participation in a population-based colorectal cancer screening program in Catalonia, Spain Full Text available with Trip Pro

Testing behavioral interventions to optimize participation in a population-based colorectal cancer screening program in Catalonia, Spain The aim of the study was to measure the effect of three cost-neutral behavioral interventions on participation compared to the standard invitation letter in a population-based colorectal cancer screening program in 2014. For that purpose, a four-arm randomized field trial was conducted among 5077 individuals aged 50 to 69 years. Over an 8-week period, each (...) participation (OR: 0.60; 95% CI: 0.38-0.95). While none of the intervention strategies improved participation rates we found that praising the benefit of regular screening may discourage individuals who have never been invited before as the continuous behavior may be perceived as a large request. Nevertheless, the reminder letter boosted participation rates independently of the intervention assigned.Crown Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2019 EvidenceUpdates

16. Screening for Colorectal Cancer

of CRC or advanced adenoma warrants more intense screening for CRC. Well-designed prospective studies are needed in order to make de?nitive evidence-based recommendations about the age to commence screening and appropriate interval between screening tests. Keywords: Adenoma; Cancer; Colonoscopy; Colorectal; FOBT; Neoplasms; Polyp; Screening. Executive Summary Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in Canada and the United States. A positive family history (FH) signi (...) with papillary thyroid cancer that is the cribriform-morular variant, or hepatoblastoma Individuals with a diagnosis of CRC and>10 colorectal adenomas Individuals with a personal history of20 adenomas Individuals with multiple gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyps or serrated polyposis syndrome Individuals from a family with a known hereditary syndrome associated with CRC with or without a known mutation Individuals with a desmoid tumor, multifocal or bilateral CHRPE CHRPE, congenital hypertrophy of retinal

2018 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology

17. Dental radiograph as an opportunistic screening tool for a colorectal cancer syndrome (CAT#3342)

) in children and adults? Clinical Bottom Line Incidental findings on dental radiographs could serve as screening tools for systemic diseases and syndromes. The attention should be raised when gene mutation, congenitally diseases or familial colorectal cancer are reported by patients during the medical history questionnaire. For patients with risk of FAP, the Dental panoramic radiographic score (DPRS) is inexpensive, and reinforce the referral for the further clinical investigation, gene mapping (...) Dental radiograph as an opportunistic screening tool for a colorectal cancer syndrome (CAT#3342) UTCAT3342, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Dental radiograph as an opportunistic screening tool for a colorectal cancer syndrome Clinical Question Does dental radiograph serve as an opportunistic screening tool for early detection of extraintestinal manifestations of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP

2018 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

18. Recent advances in colorectal cancer screening Full Text available with Trip Pro

Recent advances in colorectal cancer screening 30276360 2018 11 14 2589-0514 4 3 2018 Sep Chronic diseases and translational medicine Chronic Dis Transl Med Recent advances in colorectal cancer screening. 139-147 10.1016/j.cdtm.2018.08.004 Li Dan D Department of Gastroenterology, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Santa Clara, CA 95051, USA. Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA 94612, USA. eng Editorial 2018 09 17 China Chronic Dis Transl Med 101679934 2095 (...) -882X Colonoscopy Colorectal cancer Screening 2018 06 26 2018 10 3 6 0 2018 10 3 6 0 2018 10 3 6 1 epublish 30276360 10.1016/j.cdtm.2018.08.004 S2095-882X(18)30060-4 PMC6160607 Lancet. 2013 Apr 6;381(9873):1185-93 23414648 Am J Surg Pathol. 2004 Nov;28(11):1452-9 15489648 Gastroenterology. 2016 Nov;151(5):870-878.e3 27443823 CA Cancer J Clin. 2017 May 6;67(3):177-193 28248415 Gastroenterology. 2015 Sep;149(3):777-82; quiz e16-7 26226577 Am J Gastroenterol. 2012 Sep;107(9):1315-29; quiz 1314, 1330

2018 Chronic diseases and translational medicine

19. Effectiveness of a Mailed Colorectal Cancer Screening Outreach Program in Community Health Clinics: The STOP CRC Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

percentage points; 95% CI, 0.1%-6.8%) and any colorectal cancer screening (18.3% vs 14.5%; difference, 3.8 percentage points; 95% CI, 0.6%-7.0%). We observed large variation across health centers in effectiveness (FIT completion differences range, -7.4 percentage points to 17.6 percentage points) and implementation (proportion who were mailed a FIT range, 6.5% to 68.2%). The number needed to mail to achieve a completed FIT was 4.8 overall, and 4.0 in clinics that mailed a FIT reminder.An EHR-embedded (...) Effectiveness of a Mailed Colorectal Cancer Screening Outreach Program in Community Health Clinics: The STOP CRC Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial Approximately 24 million US individuals receive care at federally qualified health centers, which historically have low rates of colorectal cancer screening. The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends routine colorectal cancer screening for individuals aged 50 to 75 years.To determine the effectiveness of an electronic health record (EHR

2018 EvidenceUpdates

20. Colon cancer screening

for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC's) Screen for Life materials. Some participants also will be asked to read a personal narrative about colon cancer screening . This study will determine whether participant's perceptions about 2015 16. Colon Capsule to Screen for Colorectal Neoplasia in Subjects with a Family History of Colorectal Cancer . BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) has been recognized as an alternative for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in average risk subjects (...) administration is a key factor in the tolerability and efficacy of colon preparation in colorectal cancer screening ]. 236-42 10.1016/j.gastrohep.2012.01.012 The quality and tolerability of antegrade (...) gut lavage bowel preparation are key elements in the success of population-based colorectal cancer screening . To evaluate cleansing quality and tolerability according to the timing of polyethylene glycol administration in persons undergoing colorectal cancer screening . Participants in colorectal cancer

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest