Latest & greatest articles for chronic pain

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Top results for chronic pain

41. A meta-ethnography of health-care professionals' experience of treating adults with chronic non-malignant pain to improve the experience and quality of healthcare

A meta-ethnography of health-care professionals' experience of treating adults with chronic non-malignant pain to improve the experience and quality of healthcare A meta-ethnography of health-care professionals' experience of treating adults with chronic non-malignant pain to improve the experience and quality of healthcare Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could

NIHR HTA programme2018

42. Non-pharmacological interventions for treating chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

Non-pharmacological interventions for treating chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. BACKGROUND: Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a common disorder in which the two main clinical features are pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms. There are currently many approaches for its management, using both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. The National Institute of Health - Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) score (...) is a validated measure commonly used to measure CP/CPPS symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of non-pharmacological therapies for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). SEARCH METHODS: We performed a comprehensive search using multiple databases, trial registries, grey literature and conference proceedings with no restrictions on the language of publication or publication status. The date of the latest search of all databases was August 2017. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included

Cochrane2018

43. Effectiveness of Models Used to Deliver Multimodal Care for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: a Rapid Evidence Review

Effectiveness of Models Used to Deliver Multimodal Care for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: a Rapid Evidence Review 29633140 2018 04 25 1525-1497 33 Suppl 1 2018 May Journal of general internal medicine J Gen Intern Med Effectiveness of Models Used to Deliver Multimodal Care for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: a Rapid Evidence Review. 71-81 10.1007/s11606-018-4328-7 Primary care providers (PCPs) face many system- and patient-level challenges in providing multimodal care for patients with complex (...) chronic pain as recommended in some pain management guidelines. Several models have been developed to improve the delivery of multimodal chronic pain care. These models vary in their key components, and work is needed to identify which have the strongest evidence of clinically-important improvements in pain and function. Our objective was to determine which primary care-based multimodal chronic pain care models provide clinically relevant benefits, define key elements of these models, and identify

EvidenceUpdates2018

44. Fluoroscopic Guided Radiofrequency of Genicular Nerves for Pain Alleviation in Chronic Knee Osteoarthritis: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

Fluoroscopic Guided Radiofrequency of Genicular Nerves for Pain Alleviation in Chronic Knee Osteoarthritis: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial 29565947 2018 03 22 2150-1149 21 2 2018 Mar Pain physician Pain Physician Fluoroscopic Guided Radiofrequency of Genicular Nerves for Pain Alleviation in Chronic Knee Osteoarthritis: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial. 169-177 Nowadays, pain and disability due to chronic knee arthritis is a very common problem in middle aged people. A lot (...) of modalities for management are available, including conservative analgesics and up to surgical interventions. Radiofrequency ablation of genicular nerves is assumed to be an effective less invasive and safe pain alleviation modality. To evaluate the efficacy of fluoroscopic guided radiofrequency neurotomy of the genicular nerves for alleviation of chronic pain and improvement of function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. A single-blind randomized controlled trial. Pain management unit

EvidenceUpdates2018

45. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques for chronic pain.

Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques for chronic pain. BACKGROUND: This is an updated version of the original Cochrane Review published in 2010, Issue 9, and last updated in 2014, Issue 4. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques aim to induce an electrical stimulation of the brain in an attempt to reduce chronic pain by directly altering brain activity. They include repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES), transcranial direct current (...) stimulation (tDCS), transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) and reduced impedance non-invasive cortical electrostimulation (RINCE). OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of non-invasive cortical stimulation techniques in the treatment of chronic pain. SEARCH METHODS: For this update we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, LILACS and clinical trials registers from July 2013 to October 2017. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised and quasi-randomised studies of rTMS, CES, tDCS, RINCE and tRNS

Cochrane2018

46. A commonly used treatment does not improve chronic low back pain

A commonly used treatment does not improve chronic low back pain NIHR DC | Signal - A commonly used treatment does not improve chronic low back pain Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal A commonly used treatment does not improve chronic low back pain Published on 7 November 2017 This trial found that destroying nerves that take pain signals to the brain using heat (radiofrequency denervation) did not improve pain, function or a sense of “recovery”. The treatment (...) on the research. Why was this study needed? Low back pain of no specific source is the single biggest cause of disability worldwide. Exact UK figures are lacking as it is recorded alongside other musculoskeletal conditions. However, an estimated 30.6 million working days were lost in 2013 due to these conditions. In most cases, back pain resolves quickly. However, chronic back pain can interfere with everyday life, lead to time off work or education and affect the quality of life. Chronic back pain can

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

47. Acupuncture shown to have benefits for treatment of some chronic pain

Acupuncture shown to have benefits for treatment of some chronic pain NIHR DC | Signal - Acupuncture shown to have benefits for treatment of some chronic pain Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Acupuncture shown to have benefits for treatment of some chronic pain Published on 20 June 2017 Acupuncture is not a placebo for treatment of chronic pain. This NIHR-funded systematic review shows that acupuncture is better than usual care and sham acupuncture for pain from (...) musculoskeletal conditions, knee osteoarthritis and chronic headache. This NIHR review was large with over 140 trials overall, and the direct comparison with sham acupuncture helps to address uncertainty around whether acupuncture gives clinical benefit above a “placebo effect.” Acupuncture had a smaller effect on pain when compared with sham acupuncture than when compared with no acupuncture, but both comparisons showed statistically significant differences. Acupuncture also improved quality of life compared

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

48. Randomized Controlled Trial of Telephone-delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Versus Supportive Care for Chronic Back Pain

Randomized Controlled Trial of Telephone-delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Versus Supportive Care for Chronic Back Pain 28877139 2018 04 12 1536-5409 34 4 2018 Apr The Clinical journal of pain Clin J Pain Randomized Controlled Trial of Telephone-delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Versus Supportive Care for Chronic Back Pain. 322-327 10.1097/AJP.0000000000000555 The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a telephone-delivered, home-based cognitive-behavioral (...) intervention for chronic low back pain in comparison to a matched supportive care (SC) treatment. Participants (N=66) were patients with chronic back pain that were randomized to either an 8-week Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) or a SC condition matched for contact frequency, format, and time. Participants completed validated measures of improvement in back pain disability, pain severity, and overall improvement. Intent-to-treat analyses at posttreatment showed that the treatment groups not show

EvidenceUpdates2018

49. Effects and underlying mechanisms of unstable shoes on chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

Effects and underlying mechanisms of unstable shoes on chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial 29333872 2018 01 15 1477-0873 2018 Jan 01 Clinical rehabilitation Clin Rehabil Effects and underlying mechanisms of unstable shoes on chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial. 269215517753972 10.1177/0269215517753972 To investigate the effects that wearing unstable shoes has on disability, trunk muscle activity, and lumbar spine range of motion (ROM) in patients with chronic (...) England Clin Rehabil 8802181 0269-2155 Chronic low back pain electromyography gait unstable shoes 2018 1 16 6 0 2018 1 16 6 0 2018 1 16 6 0 aheadofprint 29333872 10.1177/0269215517753972

EvidenceUpdates2018

50. Efficacy and Safety of Sacral and Percutaneous Tibial Neuromodulation in Non-neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction and Chronic Pelvic Pain: A Systematic Review of the Literature

Efficacy and Safety of Sacral and Percutaneous Tibial Neuromodulation in Non-neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction and Chronic Pelvic Pain: A Systematic Review of the Literature 29336927 2018 01 16 1873-7560 2018 Jan 11 European urology Eur. Urol. Efficacy and Safety of Sacral and Percutaneous Tibial Neuromodulation in Non-neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction and Chronic Pelvic Pain: A Systematic Review of the Literature. S0302-2838(17)30978-8 10.1016/j.eururo.2017.11.002 (...) , with at least 20 patients and 6 mo of follow-up. Twenty-one reports were identified. Concerning SNM, the improvement of ≥50% in leakage episodes ranged widely between 29% and 76%. Overall dry rate ranged between 43% and 56%. Overall success/improvement rate in PTNS varied between 54% and 59%. Symptom improvement or efficacy in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome patients appeared to be lower compared with other indications in both techniques. Safety data showed fewer side effects in patients

EvidenceUpdates2018

51. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques for chronic pain.

Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques for chronic pain. BACKGROUND: This is an updated version of the original Cochrane Review published in 2010, Issue 9, and last updated in 2014, Issue 4. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques aim to induce an electrical stimulation of the brain in an attempt to reduce chronic pain by directly altering brain activity. They include repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES), transcranial direct current (...) stimulation (tDCS), transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) and reduced impedance non-invasive cortical electrostimulation (RINCE). OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of non-invasive cortical stimulation techniques in the treatment of chronic pain. SEARCH METHODS: For this update we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, LILACS and clinical trials registers from July 2013 to October 2017. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised and quasi-randomised studies of rTMS, CES, tDCS, RINCE and tRNS

Cochrane2018

52. Cannabis-based medicines for chronic neuropathic pain in adults.

Cannabis-based medicines for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. BACKGROUND: This review is one of a series on drugs used to treat chronic neuropathic pain. Estimates of the population prevalence of chronic pain with neuropathic components range between 6% and 10%. Current pharmacological treatment options for neuropathic pain afford substantial benefit for only a few people, often with adverse effects that outweigh the benefits. There is a need to explore other treatment options (...) , with different mechanisms of action for treatment of conditions with chronic neuropathic pain. Cannabis has been used for millennia to reduce pain. Herbal cannabis is currently strongly promoted by some patients and their advocates to treat any type of chronic pain. OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of cannabis-based medicines (herbal, plant-derived, synthetic) compared to placebo or conventional drugs for conditions with chronic neuropathic pain in adults. SEARCH METHODS

Cochrane2018

53. Effect of Opioid vs Nonopioid Medications on Pain-Related Function in Patients With Chronic Back Pain or Hip or Knee Osteoarthritis Pain: The SPACE Randomized Clinical Trial.

Effect of Opioid vs Nonopioid Medications on Pain-Related Function in Patients With Chronic Back Pain or Hip or Knee Osteoarthritis Pain: The SPACE Randomized Clinical Trial. Importance: Limited evidence is available regarding long-term outcomes of opioids compared with nonopioid medications for chronic pain. Objective: To compare opioid vs nonopioid medications over 12 months on pain-related function, pain intensity, and adverse effects. Design, Setting, and Participants: Pragmatic, 12-month (...) , randomized trial with masked outcome assessment. Patients were recruited from Veterans Affairs primary care clinics from June 2013 through December 2015; follow-up was completed December 2016. Eligible patients had moderate to severe chronic back pain or hip or knee osteoarthritis pain despite analgesic use. Of 265 patients enrolled, 25 withdrew prior to randomization and 240 were randomized. Interventions: Both interventions (opioid and nonopioid medication therapy) followed a treat-to-target strategy

JAMA2018

54. Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain

Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain 29394211 2018 02 02 1532-8651 2018 Feb 01 Regional anesthesia and pain medicine Reg Anesth Pain Med Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain. 10.1097/AAP.0000000000000740 This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS (...) ) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous

EvidenceUpdates2018

55. Web-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Chronic Pain Patients with Aberrant Drug-Related Behavior: Outcomes from a Randomized Controlled Trial

Web-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Chronic Pain Patients with Aberrant Drug-Related Behavior: Outcomes from a Randomized Controlled Trial 29346579 2018 03 08 1526-4637 2018 Jan 13 Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.) Pain Med Web-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Chronic Pain Patients with Aberrant Drug-Related Behavior: Outcomes from a Randomized Controlled Trial. 10.1093/pm/pnx334 There is high unmet need for effective behavioral treatments for chronic pain patients at risk (...) for or with demonstrated histories of opioid misuse. Despite growing evidence supporting technology-based delivery of self-management interventions for chronic pain, very few such programs target co-occurring chronic pain and aberrant drug-related behavior. This randomized controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of a novel, web-based self-management intervention, grounded in cognitive behavior therapy, for chronic pain patients with aberrant drug-related behavior. Opioid-treated chronic pain patients

EvidenceUpdates2018

56. Manipulation and mobilization for treating chronic low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Manipulation and mobilization for treating chronic low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis 29371112 2018 02 11 1878-1632 2018 Jan 31 The spine journal : official journal of the North American Spine Society Spine J Manipulation and mobilization for treating chronic low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis. S1529-9430(18)30016-0 10.1016/j.spinee.2018.01.013 Mobilization and manipulation therapies are widely used to benefit patients with chronic low back pain. However (...) , questions remain about their efficacy, dosing, safety, and how these approaches compare with other therapies. The present study aims to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, and safety of various mobilization and manipulation therapies for treatment of chronic low back pain. This is a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. The present study measures self-reported pain, function, health-related quality of life, and adverse events. We identified studies by searching multiple electronic databases

EvidenceUpdates2018

57. Pain Neurophysiology Education and Therapeutic Exercise for Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

Pain Neurophysiology Education and Therapeutic Exercise for Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial 29138049 2018 02 08 1532-821X 99 2 2018 Feb Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation Arch Phys Med Rehabil Pain Neurophysiology Education and Therapeutic Exercise for Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial. 338-347 S0003-9993(17)31343-6 10.1016/j.apmr.2017.10.016 To assess the effect of a pain neurophysiology (...) education (PNE) program plus therapeutic exercise (TE) for patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Single-blind randomized controlled trial. Private clinic and university. Patients with CLBP for ≥6 months (N=56). Participants were randomized to receive either a TE program consisting of motor control, stretching, and aerobic exercises (n=28) or the same TE program in addition to a PNE program (n=28), conducted in two 30- to 50-minute sessions in groups of 4 to 6 participants. The primary outcome

EvidenceUpdates2018

58. Conventional Radiofrequency Thermocoagulation vs Pulsed Radiofrequency Neuromodulation of Ganglion Impar in Chronic Perineal Pain of Nononcological Origin

Conventional Radiofrequency Thermocoagulation vs Pulsed Radiofrequency Neuromodulation of Ganglion Impar in Chronic Perineal Pain of Nononcological Origin 29329442 2018 03 08 1526-4637 2018 Jan 10 Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.) Pain Med Conventional Radiofrequency Thermocoagulation vs Pulsed Radiofrequency Neuromodulation of Ganglion Impar in Chronic Perineal Pain of Nononcological Origin. 10.1093/pm/pnx244 Chronic nononcological perineal pain has been effectively managed by ganglion Impar block (...) , as assessed by the subjective patient satisfaction questionnaire. There was no complication in any patient of either study group, except for short-lived infection at the site of skin puncture in a few. Ganglion Impar block by conventional radiofrequency provided a significantly better quality of pain relief with no major side effects in patients with chronic nononcological perineal pain as compared with pulsed radiofrequency. The short-term follow-up period of only six weeks was a major drawback

EvidenceUpdates2018

59. Gabapentin for Chronic Neuropathic Pain.

Gabapentin for Chronic Neuropathic Pain. Clinical Question: Is gabapentin associated with pain relief in people with chronic neuropathic pain? Bottom Line: Oral gabapentin (1200-3600 mg/d for 4-12 weeks) for patients with moderate or severe neuropathic pain from postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) or painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is associated with pain reduction of at least 50% in 14% to 17% more patients than placebo.

JAMA2018

60. Literacy-Adapted Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Versus Education for Chronic Pain at Low-Income Clinics: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Literacy-Adapted Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Versus Education for Chronic Pain at Low-Income Clinics: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Background: Chronic pain is common and challenging to treat. Although cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is efficacious, its benefit in disadvantaged populations is largely unknown. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of literacy-adapted and simplified group CBT versus group pain education (EDU) versus usual care. Design: Randomized controlled trial (...) . (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01967342 ). Setting: Community health centers serving low-income patients in Alabama. Patients: Adults (aged 19 to 71 years) with mixed chronic pain. Interventions: CBT and EDU delivered in 10 weekly 90-minute group sessions. Measurements: Self-reported, postintervention pain intensity (primary outcome) and physical function and depression (secondary outcomes). Results: 290 participants were enrolled (70.7% of whom were women, 66.9% minority group members, 72.4% at or below the poverty

Annals of Internal Medicine2018