Latest & greatest articles for chlorhexidine

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Top results for chlorhexidine

141. Chlorhexidine: reminder of potential for hypersensitivity

Chlorhexidine: reminder of potential for hypersensitivity Chlorhexidine: reminder of potential for hypersensitivity - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. or Search Chlorhexidine: reminder of potential for hypersensitivity Healthcare professionals are reminded that chlorhexidine is known to induce hypersensitivity, including generalised allergic reactions and anaphylactic shock. Published 11 December 2014 From: Therapeutic area: Article date: January 2012 Chlorhexidine (...) is an antibacterial present in a wide range of topical and oromucosal antiseptic products, including over-the-counter mouthwashes. It can also be used in some indwelling catheters to prevent contamination. Healthcare professionals are reminded that chlorhexidine is known to induce hypersensitivity, including generalised allergic reactions and anaphylactic shock. The prevalence of chlorhexidine hypersensitivity is unknown, but available literature suggests this is likely to be very rare. Products or medical

2012 MHRA Drug Safety Update

142. The effect of cord cleansing with chlorhexidine on neonatal mortality in rural Bangladesh: a community-based, cluster-randomised trial. (Abstract)

The effect of cord cleansing with chlorhexidine on neonatal mortality in rural Bangladesh: a community-based, cluster-randomised trial. Up to half of neonatal deaths in high mortality settings are due to infections, many of which can originate through the freshly cut umbilical cord stump. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of two cord-cleansing regimens with the promotion of dry cord care in the prevention of neonatal mortality.We did a community-based, parallel cluster-randomised trial (...) in Sylhet, Bangladesh. We divided the study area into 133 clusters, which were randomly assigned to one of the two chlorhexidine cleansing regimens (single cleansing as soon as possible after birth; daily cleansing for 7 days after birth) or promotion of dry cord care. Randomisation was done by use of a computer-generated sequence, stratified by cluster-specific participation in a previous trial. All livebirths were eligible; those visited within 7 days by a local female village health worker trained

2012 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

143. Topical application of chlorhexidine to neonatal umbilical cords for prevention of omphalitis and neonatal mortality in a rural district of Pakistan: a community-based, cluster-randomised trial. (Abstract)

Topical application of chlorhexidine to neonatal umbilical cords for prevention of omphalitis and neonatal mortality in a rural district of Pakistan: a community-based, cluster-randomised trial. Umbilical cord infection (omphalitis) is a risk factor for neonatal sepsis and mortality in low-resource settings where home deliveries are common. We aimed to assess the effect of umbilical-cord cleansing with 4% chlorhexidine (CHX) solution, with or without handwashing with antiseptic soap

2012 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

144. Economic value of dispensing home-based preoperative chlorhexidine bathing cloths to prevent surgical site infection

Economic value of dispensing home-based preoperative chlorhexidine bathing cloths to prevent surgical site infection Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2011 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

145. Chlorhexidine Is Not Superior To Sodium Hypochlorite As A Root Canal Disinfectant During Root Canal Therapy For Apical Periodontitis

Chlorhexidine Is Not Superior To Sodium Hypochlorite As A Root Canal Disinfectant During Root Canal Therapy For Apical Periodontitis UTCAT2087, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Chlorhexidine Is Not Superior To Sodium Hypochlorite As A Root Canal Disinfectant During Root Canal Therapy For Apical Periodontitis Clinical Question In a patient who is diabetic, does irrigating with chlorhexidine in addition (...) to sodium hypochlorite improve the healing rate of apical periodontitis better than sodium hypochlorite alone? Clinical Bottom Line Chlorhexidine is apparently neither inferior nor superior to sodium hypochlorite as a root canal disinfectant. Patients in this study were recruited from a dental school endodontic clinic and were not stated do be diabetic. (See Comments on the CAT below) Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study

2011 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

146. Topical chlorhexidine may be useful in preventing dry socket.

Topical chlorhexidine may be useful in preventing dry socket. Topical chlorhexidine may be useful in preventing dry socket. ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all. Together. Take advantage of endorsed, discounted business products Purchase ADA products Access oral-health (...) information for the public and ADA Find-A-Dentist Partnerships and Commissions Learn about ADA CERP recognition, look up CERP recognized CE providers and find CE courses. Explore CODA's role and find accredited schools and programs Learn about the examinations used in licensing dentists and dental hygienists Learn about recognized dental specialties and certifying boards Evidence Education * Associated Topics Topical chlorhexidine may be useful in preventing dry socket. Debra Ferraiolo DMD, FAGD; Silvia

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

147. Topical chlorhexidine may be useful in preventing dry socket.

Topical chlorhexidine may be useful in preventing dry socket. Topical chlorhexidine may be useful in preventing dry socket. ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all. Together. Take advantage of endorsed, discounted business products Purchase ADA products Access oral-health (...) information for the public and ADA Find-A-Dentist Partnerships and Commissions Learn about ADA CERP recognition, look up CERP recognized CE providers and find CE courses. Explore CODA's role and find accredited schools and programs Learn about the examinations used in licensing dentists and dental hygienists Learn about recognized dental specialties and certifying boards Evidence Education * Associated Topics Topical chlorhexidine may be useful in preventing dry socket. Debra Ferraiolo DMD, FAGD; Silvia

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

148. Topical chlorhexidine may be useful in preventing dry socket.

Topical chlorhexidine may be useful in preventing dry socket. Topical chlorhexidine may be useful in preventing dry socket. ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all. Together. Take advantage of endorsed, discounted business products Purchase ADA products Access oral-health (...) information for the public and ADA Find-A-Dentist Partnerships and Commissions Learn about ADA CERP recognition, look up CERP recognized CE providers and find CE courses. Explore CODA's role and find accredited schools and programs Learn about the examinations used in licensing dentists and dental hygienists Learn about recognized dental specialties and certifying boards Evidence Education * Associated Topics Topical chlorhexidine may be useful in preventing dry socket. Debra Ferraiolo DMD, FAGD; Silvia

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

149. Anti-infective external coating of central venous catheters: a randomized, noninferiority trial comparing 5-fluorouracil with chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine in preventing catheter colonization (Abstract)

Anti-infective external coating of central venous catheters: a randomized, noninferiority trial comparing 5-fluorouracil with chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine in preventing catheter colonization The antimetabolite drug, 5-fluorouracil, inhibits microbial growth. Coating of central venous catheters with 5-fluorouracil may reduce the risk of catheter infection. Our objective was to compare the safety and efficacy of central venous catheters externally coated with 5-fluorouracil with those coated (...) with chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine.Prospective, single-blind, randomized, active-controlled, multicentered, noninferiority trial.Twenty-five US medical center intensive care units.A total of 960 adult patients requiring central venous catheterization for up to 28 days.Patients were randomized to receive a central venous catheter externally coated with either 5-fluorouracil (n = 480) or chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine (n = 480).The primary antimicrobial outcome was a dichotomous measure (<15 colony

2011 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

150. Systematic review and meta-analysis of preoperative antisepsis with chlorhexidine versus povidone-iodine in clean-contaminated surgery Full Text available with Trip Pro

Systematic review and meta-analysis of preoperative antisepsis with chlorhexidine versus povidone-iodine in clean-contaminated surgery Surgical-site infection increases morbidity, mortality and financial burden. The preferred topical antiseptic agent (chlorhexidine or povidone-iodine) for preoperative skin cleansing is unclear.A meta-analysis of clinical trials was conducted to determine whether preoperative antisepsis with chlorhexidine or povidone-iodine reduced surgical-site infection (...) in clean-contaminated surgery.The systematic review identified six eligible studies, containing 5031 patients. Chlorhexidine reduced postoperative surgical-site infection compared with povidone-iodine (pooled odds ratio 0.68, 95 per cent confidence interval 0.50 to 0.94; P = 0.019) .Chlorhexidine should be used preferentially for preoperative antisepsis in clean-contaminated surgery.Copyright © 2010 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

2011 EvidenceUpdates

151. The effect of a chlorhexidine-based surgical lubricant during pelvic examination on the detection of group B Streptococcus (Abstract)

The effect of a chlorhexidine-based surgical lubricant during pelvic examination on the detection of group B Streptococcus The objective of the study was to estimate whether surgical lubricant used during pelvic examination alters the detection of group B Streptococcus (GBS).We conducted a prospective cohort study of patients undergoing GBS screening at the prenatal clinics of a New York City public hospital. Two specimens were collected from each patient, before and after a pelvic examination

2010 EvidenceUpdates

152. Chlorhexidine Applications Improve Oral Health of Patients with Down Syndrome

Chlorhexidine Applications Improve Oral Health of Patients with Down Syndrome UTCAT466, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Chlorhexidine Applications Improve Oral Health of Patients with Down Syndrome Clinical Question In a patient with Down Syndrome and poor oral hygiene, will chlorhexidine applications prove more successful at increasing the patient’s overall oral health versus no treatment? Clinical (...) Bottom Line Chlorhexidine applications in a 2% sustained-delivery dosage form along with rinses with 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthwash and brushing with 1% chlorhexidine gel improve the oral health of patients with Down Syndrome. (See Comments on the CAT below) Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Stabholz/1991 30 subjects with Down Syndrome; 10 received placebo, 10 received chlorhexidine solution

2010 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

153. Herbal mouthwash more effective than OTC mouthwash and may be as effective as chlorhexidine rinse.

Herbal mouthwash more effective than OTC mouthwash and may be as effective as chlorhexidine rinse. UTCAT479, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Herbal mouthwash more effective than OTC mouthwash and may be as effective as chlorhexidine rinse Clinical Question Can herbal mouthwash be as effective as OTC mouthwash at preventing gum disease? Clinical Bottom Line In vivo, both herbal mouth and gum therapy (...) and Peridex were significantly more effective at inhibiting microbial growth than Listerine. In vitro, Chlorhexidine rinse was the most effective; herbal rinse was less effective than chlorhexidine but more effective than an essential oil rinse. (See Comments on the CAT below) Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Haffajee/2008 120 inoculated plates In vitro study Key results In vitro, Chlorhexidine

2010 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

154. Randomised controlled trial: Preoperative skin cleansing with chlorhexidine-alcohol reduces surgical site infection after clean-contaminated surgery compared with povidone-iodine

Randomised controlled trial: Preoperative skin cleansing with chlorhexidine-alcohol reduces surgical site infection after clean-contaminated surgery compared with povidone-iodine Preoperative skin cleansing with chlorhexidine-alcohol reduces surgical site infection after clean-contaminated surgery compared with povidone-iodine | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser (...) at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Preoperative skin cleansing with chlorhexidine-alcohol reduces

2010 Evidence-Based Nursing

155. Systematic review and cost analysis comparing use of chlorhexidine with use of iodine for preoperative skin antisepsis to prevent surgical site infection

Systematic review and cost analysis comparing use of chlorhexidine with use of iodine for preoperative skin antisepsis to prevent surgical site infection Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2010 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

156. Chlorhexidine-Alcohol versus Povidone-Iodine for Surgical-Site Antisepsis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Chlorhexidine-Alcohol versus Povidone-Iodine for Surgical-Site Antisepsis. Since the patient's skin is a major source of pathogens that cause surgical-site infection, optimization of preoperative skin antisepsis may decrease postoperative infections. We hypothesized that preoperative skin cleansing with chlorhexidine-alcohol is more protective against infection than is povidone-iodine.We randomly assigned adults undergoing clean-contaminated surgery in six hospitals to preoperative skin (...) preparation with either chlorhexidine-alcohol scrub or povidone-iodine scrub and paint. The primary outcome was any surgical-site infection within 30 days after surgery. Secondary outcomes included individual types of surgical-site infections.A total of 849 subjects (409 in the chlorhexidine-alcohol group and 440 in the povidone-iodine group) qualified for the intention-to-treat analysis. The overall rate of surgical-site infection was significantly lower in the chlorhexidine-alcohol group than

2010 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

157. Chlorhexidine gel reduces incidence of alveolar osteitis after extraction of the mandibular third molars. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Chlorhexidine gel reduces incidence of alveolar osteitis after extraction of the mandibular third molars. A randomised, prospective clinical trial with parallel groups was carried out in a single centre.The experimental (gel) group (n=41) applied a bioadhesive 0.2% chlorhexidine gel to the wound during the first postoperative week and a control (rinse) group (n=32) used a 0.12% (v/v) chlorhexidine mouthrinse during the first week following third molar extraction. Patients were evaluated (...) on the third and seventh postoperative day.Alveolar osteitis was evaluated according to Blum's criteria..A 70% decrease in postoperative alveolar osteitis in the gel group (P 0.04) was observed. The rinse group had 25% incidence of postoperative alveolar osteitis, whereas the gel group had 7.5%. T equates to a number needed to treat of six (95% confidence interval, 3-144).It was concluded that the topical application of bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel to the surgical wound during the postoperative week may

2009 Evidence-based dentistry Controlled trial quality: uncertain

158. Oropharyngeal cleansing with 0.2% chlorhexidine for prevention of nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients: an open-label randomized trial with 0.01% potassium permanganate as control (Abstract)

Oropharyngeal cleansing with 0.2% chlorhexidine for prevention of nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients: an open-label randomized trial with 0.01% potassium permanganate as control Oral cleansing with chlorhexidine decreases the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia in patients after cardiac surgery. However, evidence of its benefit in ICU patients is conflicting.Patients admitted to the ICU of an Indian tertiary care teaching hospital were randomized to twice-daily oropharyngeal (...) cleansing with 0.2% chlorhexidine or 0.01% potassium permanganate (control) solution. Effects on the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia during ICU stay (primary outcome) and length of ICU stay and in-hospital mortality (secondary outcomes) were studied.Five hundred twelve patients were randomized to either the chlorhexidine group (n = 250) or the control group (n = 262). Of the 471 subjects who completed the protocol, nosocomial pneumonia developed in 16 of 224 subjects (7.1%) in the chlorhexidine group

2009 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

159. Chlorhexidine and Caries Incidence In School-Based Programs

Chlorhexidine and Caries Incidence In School-Based Programs UTCAT452, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Chlorhexidine Does not Reduce Caries Incidence In School-Based Programs Compared with Regular Fluoride Use and Oral Hygiene Clinical Question In school-based programs with children and adolescents, is it more beneficial to use Chlorhexidine to prevent dental caries compared to fluoride treatment (...) ? Clinical Bottom Line In school-based programs, repeated application of chlorhexidine does not lower the caries incidence in young individuals any more than regular fluoride use and oral hygiene practices. (See Comments on the CAT below) Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Ersin/2008 149 eleven to thirteen year olds with high caries risk and low caries incidence Randomized Clinical Trial Key

2009 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

160. Preoperative whole-body bathing with chlorhexidine gluconate for prevention of surgical site infection

Preoperative whole-body bathing with chlorhexidine gluconate for prevention of surgical site infection Preoperative whole-body bathing with chlorhexidine gluconate for prevention of surgical site infection Preoperative whole-body bathing with chlorhexidine gluconate for prevention of surgical site infection Citation Preoperative whole-body bathing with chlorhexidine gluconate for prevention of surgical site infection. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. 2009 Authors' objectives

Surgical site infections (...) (SSIs) occur in approximately 2.0% to 3.5% of surgeries and have potentially serious consequences including death. These infections prolong hospitalization and increase costs. Whole-body bathing with an antiseptic such as chlorhexidine gluconate is widely employed before surgery to decrease the number of bacteria on the skin, in an attempt to decrease the incidence of SSIs. Despite their widespread use, it has not been conclusively shown that bathing or showering with these antiseptics actually

2009 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.