Latest & greatest articles for cerebral palsy

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Top results for cerebral palsy

221. Review of the effects of progressive resisted muscle strengthening in children with cerebral palsy: a clinical consensus exercise

Review of the effects of progressive resisted muscle strengthening in children with cerebral palsy: a clinical consensus exercise Review of the effects of progressive resisted muscle strengthening in children with cerebral palsy: a clinical consensus exercise Review of the effects of progressive resisted muscle strengthening in children with cerebral palsy: a clinical consensus exercise Darrah J, Fan J S, Chen L C, Nunweiler J, Watkins B Authors' objectives To determine the effects (...) of progressive resisted muscle strengthening for children with a diagnosis of cerebral palsy (CP). Searching MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, PsycINFO and Sport Discus were searched from 1996 onwards, as well as bibliographies.Search terms used were included. Earlier studies were identified from bibliographies. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review All designs were included. One study was a randomised controlled trial (RCT) and the other included studies were case series with no controls

1997 DARE.

222. Intrathecal baclofen for spasticity in cerebral palsy. (PubMed)

Intrathecal baclofen for spasticity in cerebral palsy. Seventeen patients with congenital spastic cerebral palsy and six patients with other forms of spasticity were injected intrathecally with doses of placebo or baclofen, 25 micrograms, 50 micrograms, or 100 micrograms, in a randomized, double-blind manner. Muscle tone in the upper and lower extremities was assessed by Ashworth scores both before the injections and every 2 hours afterward for 8 hours. Function of the upper extremities (...) in children with cerebral palsy, as it does in adults with spasticity of spinal origin.

1991 JAMA Controlled trial quality: uncertain

223. Cerebral palsy among children born during the Dublin randomised trial of intrapartum monitoring. (PubMed)

Cerebral palsy among children born during the Dublin randomised trial of intrapartum monitoring. In a randomised trial involving 13,079 liveborn children intrapartum care by electronic fetal heart rate monitoring, with scalp blood sampling when indicated, was associated with a 55% reduction in neonatal seizures. Reassessment, when aged 4, of the 9 children in the intensively monitored group and 21 in the control group who survived after neonatal seizures showed that 3 such children in each (...) group had cerebral palsy. A fourth child in the intensively monitored group with cerebral palsy had had transient abnormal neurological signs during the neonatal period. 8 other children in the intensively monitored group and 7 in the control group who had not had abnormal neurological signs in the neonatal period also had cerebral palsy. 16 (78%) of the total of 22 cases of cerebral palsy had not shown clinical signs suggestive of intrapartum asphyxia. Thus, compared with intermittent intrapartum

1989 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

224. The effects of physical therapy on cerebral palsy. A controlled trial in infants with spastic diplegia. (PubMed)

The effects of physical therapy on cerebral palsy. A controlled trial in infants with spastic diplegia. Legislatively mandated programs for early intervention on behalf of handicapped infants often stipulate the inclusion of physical therapy as a major component of treatment for cerebral palsy. To evaluate the effects of physical therapy, we randomly assigned 48 infants (12 to 19 months of age) with mild to severe spastic diplegia to receive either 12 months of physical therapy (Group A) or 6

1988 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain