Latest & greatest articles for cephalexin

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Top results for cephalexin

1. Cephalexin

Cephalexin Top results for cephalexin - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4 (...) ) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for cephalexin The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

2. Effect of Post-Cesarean Delivery Oral Cephalexin and Metronidazole on Surgical Site Infection Among Obese Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial. (PubMed)

Effect of Post-Cesarean Delivery Oral Cephalexin and Metronidazole on Surgical Site Infection Among Obese Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial. The rate of obesity among US women has been increasing, and obesity is associated with increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI) following cesarean delivery. The optimal perioperative antibiotic prophylactic regimen in this high-risk population undergoing cesarean delivery is unknown.To determine rates of SSI among obese women who receive (...) prophylactic oral cephalexin and metronidazole vs placebo for 48 hours following cesarean delivery.Randomized, double-blind clinical trial comparing oral cephalexin and metronidazole vs placebo for 48 hours following cesarean delivery for the prevention of SSI in obese women (prepregnancy BMI ≥30) who had received standard intravenous preoperative cephalosporin prophylaxis. Randomization was stratified by intact vs rupture of membranes prior to delivery. The study was conducted at the University

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2017 JAMA

3. Effect of Cephalexin Plus Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole vs Cephalexin Alone on Clinical Cure of Uncomplicated Cellulitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial. (PubMed)

Effect of Cephalexin Plus Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole vs Cephalexin Alone on Clinical Cure of Uncomplicated Cellulitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Emergency department visits for skin infections in the United States have increased with the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). For cellulitis without purulent drainage, β-hemolytic streptococci are presumed to be the predominant pathogens. It is unknown if antimicrobial regimens possessing in vitro MRSA activity (...) provide improved outcomes compared with treatments lacking MRSA activity.To determine whether cephalexin plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole yields a higher clinical cure rate of uncomplicated cellulitis than cephalexin alone.Multicenter, double-blind, randomized superiority trial in 5 US emergency departments among outpatients older than 12 years with cellulitis and no wound, purulent drainage, or abscess enrolled from April 2009 through June 2012. All participants had soft tissue ultrasound performed

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2017 JAMA

4. Cephalexin plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was not superior to cephalexin alone for the treatment of outpatient non-purulent cellulitis

Cephalexin plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was not superior to cephalexin alone for the treatment of outpatient non-purulent cellulitis Cephalexin plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was not superior to cephalexin alone for the treatment of outpatient non-purulent cellulitis | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use (...) cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Cephalexin plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was not superior to cephalexin alone for the treatment

2017 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

5. Randomized controlled trial of cephalexin versus clindamycin for uncomplicated pediatric skin infections (PubMed)

Randomized controlled trial of cephalexin versus clindamycin for uncomplicated pediatric skin infections To compare clindamycin and cephalexin for treatment of uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) caused predominantly by community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We hypothesized that clindamycin would be superior to cephalexin (an antibiotic without MRSA activity) for treatment of these infections.Patients aged 6 months to 18 years (...) with uncomplicated SSTIs not requiring hospitalization were enrolled September 2006 through May 2009. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to 7 days of cephalexin or clindamycin; primary and secondary outcomes were clinical improvement at 48 to 72 hours and resolution at 7 days. Cultures were obtained and tested for antimicrobial susceptibilities, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type, and Panton-Valentine leukocidin status.Of 200 enrolled patients, 69% had MRSA cultured from wounds. Most MRSA were USA300

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2011 EvidenceUpdates

6. Cephalexin for susceptible bacteriuria in afebrile, long-term catheterized patients. (PubMed)

Cephalexin for susceptible bacteriuria in afebrile, long-term catheterized patients. Patients with long-term indwelling urethral catheters are subject to acute and long-term complications of bacteriuria. To evaluate the common practice of short-course antibiotic therapy in such patients, we performed a randomized controlled trial of ten-day courses of cephalexin monohydrate repeated whenever a susceptible bacteriuria was present. We observed 17 cephalexin group patients for 545 patient-weeks (...) (160 cephalexin courses) and 18 control group patients for 477 patient-weeks. Throughout the study, the groups were comparable in regard to incidence and prevalence of bacteriuria, number of bacterial strains per weekly urine specimen, incidence of febrile days, and incidence of obstructed catheters. In the cephalexin group, the frequency of fever during periods when antibiotics were being used was similar to that during periods when antibiotics were not being used. More cephalexin-resistant

1982 JAMA