Latest & greatest articles for carvedilol

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Top results for carvedilol

1. Efficacy and safety of bisoprolol fumarate compared with carvedilol in Japanese patients with chronic heart failure: results of the randomized, controlled, double-blind, Multistep Administration of bisoprolol IN Chronic Heart Failure II (MAIN-CHF II) stud (PubMed)

Efficacy and safety of bisoprolol fumarate compared with carvedilol in Japanese patients with chronic heart failure: results of the randomized, controlled, double-blind, Multistep Administration of bisoprolol IN Chronic Heart Failure II (MAIN-CHF II) stud Bisoprolol fumarate (bisoprolol) is a β-blocker widely used to treat chronic heart failure (CHF). However, few studies have compared its efficacy and safety with those of the widely used β-blocker carvedilol in Japanese patients with CHF. We (...) designed a confirmatory trial of bisoprolol using carvedilol as a control drug; however, the trial was discontinued after an off-label use of bisoprolol was approved during the study. Bisoprolol and carvedilol were administered for 32 weeks in 31 and 28 patients, respectively. The mean maintenance doses of bisoprolol and carvedilol were 3.3 and 13.6 mg/day, respectively, and the mean durations of treatment were 188.2 and 172.9 days, respectively. Heart-rate changes were similar in both groups. The mean

2014 Heart and vessels

2. Multiparametric comparison of CARvedilol, vs. NEbivolol, vs. BIsoprolol in moderate heart failure: the CARNEBI trial. (PubMed)

Multiparametric comparison of CARvedilol, vs. NEbivolol, vs. BIsoprolol in moderate heart failure: the CARNEBI trial. Several β-blockers, with different pharmacological characteristics, are available for heart failure (HF) treatment. We compared Carvedilol (β1-β2-α-blocker), Bisoprolol (β1-blocker), and Nebivolol (β1-blocker, NO-releasing activity).Sixty-one moderate HF patients completed a cross-over randomized trial, receiving, for 2 months each, Carvedilol, Nebivolol, Bisoprolol (25.6 ± 12.6 (...) function and BNP), echocardiography, and lung mechanics. DLCO was lower on Carvedilol (18.3 ± 4.8*mL/min/mmHg) compared to Nebivolol (19.9 ± 5.1) and Bisoprolol (20.0 ± 5.0) due to membrane diffusion 20% reduction (*=p<0.0001). Constant workload exercise showed in hypoxia a faster VO2 kinetic and a lower ventilation with Carvedilol. Peripheral and central sensitivity to CO2 was lower in Carvedilol while response to hypoxia was higher in Bisoprolol. Ventilation efficiency (VE/VCO2 slope) was 26.9 ± 4.1

2013 International journal of cardiology

3. Anti-Anginal and Metabolic Effects of Carvedilol and Atenolol in Patients with Stable Angina Pectoris: A Prospective, Randomized, Parallel, Open-Label Study. (PubMed)

Anti-Anginal and Metabolic Effects of Carvedilol and Atenolol in Patients with Stable Angina Pectoris: A Prospective, Randomized, Parallel, Open-Label Study. While recent guidelines have suggested the potential for beta-blockers as first-line agents in chronic stable angina, few data regarding comparative anti-anginal and metabolic effects between beta-blockers with and without vasodilating properties have been reported, particularly in patients with angina pectoris.Our objective was to compare (...) the anti-anginal and metabolic effects of carvedilol and atenolol in patients with stable angina pectoris.A total of 89 patients (mean age 54.9 ± 9.3 years; male 53.9 %) with stable angina pectoris were randomly assigned to carvedilol (n = 43) or atenolol (n = 46). The subjects undertook an exercise treadmill test and completed the Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ); metabolic parameters were measured at baseline and 6 months after treatment.The baseline characteristics of both groups were well

2016 American journal of cardiovascular drugs : drugs, devices, and other interventions

4. The Effect of Carvedilol Vs Propranolol in Cirrhotic Patients With Variceal Bleeding

The Effect of Carvedilol Vs Propranolol in Cirrhotic Patients With Variceal Bleeding The Effect of Carvedilol Vs Propranolol in Cirrhotic Patients With Variceal Bleeding - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before (...) adding more. The Effect of Carvedilol Vs Propranolol in Cirrhotic Patients With Variceal Bleeding The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02385422 Recruitment Status : Unknown Verified March 2015 by Shiyao Chen, Shanghai Zhongshan Hospital. Recruitment status was: Recruiting First Posted

2015 Clinical Trials

5. Titration to target dose of bisoprolol vs. carvedilol in elderly patients with heart failure: the CIBIS-ELD trial. (PubMed)

Titration to target dose of bisoprolol vs. carvedilol in elderly patients with heart failure: the CIBIS-ELD trial. Various beta-blockers with distinct pharmacological profiles are approved in heart failure, yet they remain underused and underdosed. Although potentially of major public health importance, whether one agent is superior in terms of tolerability and optimal dosing has not been investigated. The aim of this study was therefore to compare the tolerability and clinical effects of two (...) proven beta-blockers in elderly patients with heart failure.We performed a double-blind superiority trial of bisoprolol vs. carvedilol in 883 elderly heart failure patients with reduced or preserved left ventricular ejection fraction in 41 European centres. The primary endpoint was tolerability, defined as reaching and maintaining guideline-recommended target doses after 12 weeks treatment. Adverse events and clinical parameters of patient status were secondary endpoints. None of the beta-blockers

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2011 European journal of heart failure

6. Differences between bisoprolol and carvedilol in patients with chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized trial. (PubMed)

Differences between bisoprolol and carvedilol in patients with chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized trial. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) frequently coexists in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and is a key factor for beta blocker underprescription and underdosing. This study compared effects of bisoprolol and carvedilol in patients with both conditions.This was a randomized open-label study, of bisoprolol and carvedilol during (...) %) patients and 19 (30%) patients experienced adverse events during follow-up (19% bisoprolol, 42% carvedilol, p = 0.045). Study medication had to be withdrawn in 8 (13%) patients (bisoprolol: 2 due to hypotension, 1 due to bradycardia; carvedilol: 2 due to hypotension and 1 due to wheezing, dyspnoea, and oedema, respectively). Forced expiratory volume in 1(st) second significantly increased in bisoprolol (1561 ± 414 ml to 1698 ± 519 ml, p = 0.046) but not carvedilol (1704 ± 484 to 1734 ± 548, p = 0.44

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2011 Respiratory medicine

7. Carvedilol Compared to Metoprolol Succinate in the Treatment and Prognosis of Patients With Stable Chronic Heart Failure: The Carvedilol or Metoprolol Evaluation Study (COMES). (PubMed)

Carvedilol Compared to Metoprolol Succinate in the Treatment and Prognosis of Patients With Stable Chronic Heart Failure: The Carvedilol or Metoprolol Evaluation Study (COMES). β-Blockers exert a prognostic benefit in the treatment of chronic heart failure. Their pharmacological properties vary. The only substantial comparative trial to date-the Carvedilol or Metoprolol European Trial-has compared carvedilol with short-acting metoprolol tartrate at different dose equivalents. We therefore (...) addressed the relative efficacy of equal doses of carvedilol and metoprolol succinate on survival in multicenter hospital outpatients with chronic heart failure.Four thousand sixteen patients with stable systolic chronic heart failure who were using either carvedilol or metoprolol succinate were identified in the Norwegian Heart Failure Registry and The Heart Failure Registry of the University of Heidelberg, Germany. Patients were individually matched on both the dose equivalents and the respective

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2015 Circulation. Heart failure

8. Is carvedilol better than other beta-blockers for heart failure?

Is carvedilol better than other beta-blockers for heart failure? There is wide consensus about the benefits of beta-blockers in systolic heart failure. However, it is not clear if one specific beta-blocker is superior to the others. Some guidelines favor three “evidence-based” beta-blockers (carvedilol, bisoprolol and metoprolol) that have proved to decrease mortality. Carvedilol might have different physiological properties, commonly referred as pleiotropic effects, but the clinical meaning (...) of them is not clear. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified four systematic reviews including eight pertinent randomized controlled trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded there is little or no difference in hospitalization risk between carvedilol and bisoprolol or metoprolol, but carvedilol might decrease mortality compared to metoprolol or bisoprolol

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2016 Medwave

9. A Comparative Study of Carvedilol Versus Metoprolol Initiation and 1-Year Mortality Among Individuals Receiving Maintenance Hemodialysis. (PubMed)

A Comparative Study of Carvedilol Versus Metoprolol Initiation and 1-Year Mortality Among Individuals Receiving Maintenance Hemodialysis. Carvedilol and metoprolol are the β-blockers most commonly prescribed to US hemodialysis patients, accounting for ∼80% of β-blocker prescriptions. Despite well-established pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic differences between the 2 medications, little is known about their relative safety and efficacy in the hemodialysis population.A retrospective cohort study (...) using a new-user design.Medicare-enrolled hemodialysis patients treated at a large US dialysis organization who initiated carvedilol or metoprolol therapy from January 1, 2007, through December 30, 2012.Carvedilol versus metoprolol initiation.All-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and intradialytic hypotension (systolic blood pressure decrease ≥ 20mmHg during hemodialysis plus intradialytic saline solution administration) during a 1-year follow-up period.Survival models were used to estimate

2018 American Journal of Kidney Diseases

10. Impact of Carvedilol Versus β<sub>1</sub>-Selective β Blockers (Bisoprolol, Metoprolol, and Nebivolol) in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. (PubMed)

Impact of Carvedilol Versus β1-Selective β Blockers (Bisoprolol, Metoprolol, and Nebivolol) in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. Although β blocker (BB) has constituted one of the mainstays of evidence-based therapy for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the comparative efficacy of different BBs remains uncertain. We sought to determine the comparative effectiveness of nonselective BB carvedilol and the most (...) frequently prescribed β1-selective BBs (bisoprolol, metoprolol, and nebivolol) in patients with AMI undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A total of 7,863 patients were selected from the prospective national AMI registry, and patients were divided into carvedilol group (n = 6,231) and β1-selective BB group (n = 1,632) at hospital discharge. The primary end point was all-cause death or MI during follow-up. During a mean follow-up of 243 ± 144 days, all-cause death or MI occurred in 94

2015 American Journal of Cardiology

11. Carvedilol

Carvedilol USE OF CARVEDILOL IN PREGNANCY 0344 892 0909 USE OF CARVEDILOL IN PREGNANCY (Date of issue: February 2016 , Version: 2 ) This is a UKTIS monograph for use by health care professionals. For case-specific advice please contact UKTIS on 0344 892 0909. To report an exposure please download and complete a . Please encourage all women to complete an . Summary Carvedilol is a non-cardioselective beta-adrenoceptor blocking drug licensed for the treatment of hypertension, angina pectoris (...) and symptomatic chronic heart failure (CHF). There are no studies of rates of specific pregnancy outcomes following gestational exposure to carvedilol. An evidence-based assessment of the potential risks of congenital malformation, spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), preterm delivery and adverse neurodevelopmental effects following in utero exposure is therefore not possible and women should be made aware of this lack of data. Studies of beta-blockers as a class have

2014 UK Teratology Information Service

12. Lung function with carvedilol and bisoprolol in chronic heart failure: is beta selectivity relevant? (PubMed)

Lung function with carvedilol and bisoprolol in chronic heart failure: is beta selectivity relevant? Carvedilol is a beta-blocker with similar affinity for beta1- and beta2 receptors, while bisoprolol has higher beta1 affinity. The respiratory system is characterized by beta2-receptor prevalence. Airway beta receptors regulate bronchial tone and alveolar beta receptors regulate alveolar fluid re-absorption which influences gas diffusion.To compare the effects of carvedilol and bisoprolol (...) on lung function in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF).We performed a double-blind, cross-over study in 53 CHF patients. After 2 months of full dose treatment with either carvedilol or bisoprolol, we assessed lung function by salbutamol challenge, carbon monoxide lung diffusion (DLCO), including membrane conductance (DM), and gas exchange during exercise. FEV1 and FVC were similar; after salbutamol FEV1 was higher with bisoprolol (p<0.04). DLco was 82+/-21% of predicted with carvedilol and 90

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2007 European journal of heart failure

13. Carvedilol versus propranolol effect on hepatic venous pressure gradient at 1 month in patients with index variceal bleed: RCT. (PubMed)

Carvedilol versus propranolol effect on hepatic venous pressure gradient at 1 month in patients with index variceal bleed: RCT. Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) plus beta blocker is the mainstay treatment after index bleed to prevent rebleed. Primary objective of this study was to compare EVL plus propranolol versus EVL plus carvedilol on reduction of HVPG after 1 month of therapy.Patients of cirrhosis presenting with index esophageal variceal bleed received standard treatment (Somatostatin (...) therapy f/b EVL) following which HVPG was measured and patients were randomized to propranolol or carvedilol group if HVPG was >12 mmHg. Standard endotherapy protocol was continued in both groups. HVPG was again measured at 1 month of treatment.Out of 129 patients of index esophageal variceal bleed, 59 patients were eligible and randomized into carvedilol (n = 30) and propranolol (n = 29). At 1 month of treatment, decrease in heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and HVPG was significant

2016 Hepatology International

14. Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade with carvedilol on cachexia in severe chronic heart failure: results from the COPERNICUS trial. (PubMed)

Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade with carvedilol on cachexia in severe chronic heart failure: results from the COPERNICUS trial. Cardiac cachexia frequently accompanies the progression of heart failure despite the use of effective therapies for left ventricular dysfunction. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of weight loss, but the effects of sympathetic antagonism on cachexia are not well defined.We prospectively evaluated changes in body (...) weight in 2289 patients with heart failure who had dyspnoea at rest or on minimal exertion and a left ventricular ejection fraction <25%. Patients were randomly assigned (double-blind) to receive either placebo (n = 1133) or carvedilol (n = 1156) and were followed for the occurrence of major clinical events for up to 29 months (COPERNICUS trial). Patients were not enrolled if they had signs of clinically significant fluid retention due to heart failure.Patients in the carvedilol group were 33% less

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2017 Journal of cachexia, sarcopenia and muscle

15. Primary Care Corner with Geoffrey Modest MD: Carvedilol, Best Drug For Portal Hypertension?

Primary Care Corner with Geoffrey Modest MD: Carvedilol, Best Drug For Portal Hypertension? Primary Care Corner with Geoffrey Modest MD: Carvedilol, Best Drug For Portal Hypertension? | BMJ EBM Spotlight by By Dr. Geoffrey Modest A recent review looked at the varying efficacies of different nonselective b-blockers in patients with portal hypertension in cirrhosis (see Li T. BMJ Open 2016; 6: e010902), finding that carvedilol may be more effective than propranolol or nebivolol and as effective (...) as the combo of nadalol plus isosorbide mononitrate. Details: 12 RCTs were evaluated, though mostly not-so-great quality Results: 7 trials (379 patients, about 2/3 male, mean age around 50, most with alcoholic cirrhosis but some hepatitis B or C) compared carvedilol vs propranolol for hemodynamic outcomes: hepatic venous pressure(HVPG) reduction, hemodynamic response rate, post-treatment arterial pressure (mean arterial pressure, MAP). Most follow-up of only up to 6 weeks. Finding: Carvedilol

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine blog

16. Carvedilol and nebivolol improve left ventricular systolic functions in patients with non-ischemic heart failure. (PubMed)

Carvedilol and nebivolol improve left ventricular systolic functions in patients with non-ischemic heart failure. It is unclear whether carvedilol and nebivolol produce different effects on short-term left ventricle (LV) systolic function in heart failure (HF). These drugs could improve systolic and diastolic functions of the LV. Thus, we aimed to compare their effects on LV systolic functions in patients with non-ischemic HF.This study included 61 symptomatic non-ischemic HF patients with low (...) ejection fraction (EF) (EF≤40%) between September 2008 and November 2010. The patients were randomized to carvedilol (n=31, 16 males) or nebivolol (n=30, 19 male). They were evaluated clinically and echocardiographically at baseline and 3 and 6 months after target dose; 42% of patients in the carvedilol group and 47% in the nebivolol group achieved the target dose before randomization. LV systolic functions were evaluated with ventricle diameters, EF, ejection time (ET), isovolumic contraction time

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2015 Anatolian journal of cardiology

17. Comparison of Carvedilol and Atenolol on Anti-anginal and Metabolic Effects in Patients With Stable Angina Pectoris

Comparison of Carvedilol and Atenolol on Anti-anginal and Metabolic Effects in Patients With Stable Angina Pectoris Comparison of Carvedilol and Atenolol on Anti-anginal and Metabolic Effects in Patients With Stable Angina Pectoris - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number (...) of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Comparison of Carvedilol and Atenolol on Anti-anginal and Metabolic Effects in Patients With Stable Angina Pectoris The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02547597 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted

2015 Clinical Trials

18. Effect on Mortality of Higher Versus Lower β-Blocker (Metoprolol Succinate or Carvedilol) Dose in Patients With Heart Failure. (PubMed)

Effect on Mortality of Higher Versus Lower β-Blocker (Metoprolol Succinate or Carvedilol) Dose in Patients With Heart Failure. This study aimed to compare the effect of β-blocker dose and heart rate (HR) on mortality in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The Veteran Affairs databases were queried to identify all patients diagnosed with HFrEF based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision codes from 2007 to 2015 and β-blocker (carvedilol

2018 American Journal of Cardiology

19. Propranolol, Carvedilol and Rosuvastatin in the Prevention of Variceal Bleeding in Cirrhotic Portal Hypertension

Propranolol, Carvedilol and Rosuvastatin in the Prevention of Variceal Bleeding in Cirrhotic Portal Hypertension Propranolol, Carvedilol and Rosuvastatin in the Prevention of Variceal Bleeding in Cirrhotic Portal Hypertension - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved (...) studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Propranolol, Carvedilol and Rosuvastatin in the Prevention of Variceal Bleeding in Cirrhotic Portal Hypertension (Betastatin) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details

2018 Clinical Trials

20. Effects of Carvedilol Versus Metoprolol on Platelet Aggregation in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome: The PLATE-BLOCK Study. (PubMed)

Effects of Carvedilol Versus Metoprolol on Platelet Aggregation in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome: The PLATE-BLOCK Study. Platelet aggregation plays a pivotal role in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In this setting, β-blockers (BBs) are used to counteract the effects of catecholamines on heart. Circulating catecholamines can also potentiate platelet reactivity, mainly through α2- and β2-adrenoceptors on human platelets' surface, thus BB may affect platelet aggregation; however (...) , the effects of different BBs on platelet aggregation in contemporary-treated patients with ACS have been poorly investigated. One hundred patients with ACS on dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and ticagrelor were randomized to receive treatment with carvedilol, a nonselective BB (n = 50), or metoprolol, a selective β1-blocker (n = 50), at maximum tolerated dose. Light transmission aggregometry was performed at randomization (T0) and at 30-day follow-up (T30), and the results were expressed

2018 American Journal of Cardiology