Latest & greatest articles for caries

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Top results for caries

41. In A Xerostomic Patient, Fluoride-Releasing Restorative Materials Are More Successful At Preventing Future Secondary Caries Than Amalgam, Unless The Patient Has Good Oral Hygiene That Includes Daily Fluoride Gel Application, Making Both Fluoride-Releasing

In A Xerostomic Patient, Fluoride-Releasing Restorative Materials Are More Successful At Preventing Future Secondary Caries Than Amalgam, Unless The Patient Has Good Oral Hygiene That Includes Daily Fluoride Gel Application, Making Both Fluoride-Releasing UTCAT3032, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title In A Xerostomic Patient, Fluoride-Releasing Restorative Materials Are More Successful At Preventing Future (...) Secondary Caries Than Amalgam, Unless The Patient Has Good Oral Hygiene That Includes Daily Fluoride Gel Application, Making Both Fluoride-Releasing and Non-Fluoride-Releasing Materials Comparable Clinical Question In a patient with high caries risk and a buccal surface caries lesion, would a resin-modified glass ionomer restoration be more successful than an amalgam restoration in relation to future secondary caries? Clinical Bottom Line In a xerostomic patient, fluoride- releasing restorative

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2016

42. Children With Caries In Their Primary Dentition Pose a Higher Risk of Developing Caries In Their Permanent Dentition

Children With Caries In Their Primary Dentition Pose a Higher Risk of Developing Caries In Their Permanent Dentition UTCAT3035, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Children With Caries In Their Primary Dentition Pose a Higher Risk of Developing Caries In Their Permanent Dentition Clinical Question Does the prevalence of caries lesions in the primary dentition predict the prevalence of caries in (...) the permanent dentition? Clinical Bottom Line In children with primary-dentition carious lesions, the risk of caries in the permanent dentition is increased. This is supported by both a prospective, longitudinal cohort including 186 children and a retrospective study of 374 children based originally from a cohort. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Skeie/2006 186 children Prospective Cohort Study

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2016

43. Dental Crowding as a Risk Factor for Caries Is Yet To Be Established Due to Insufficient and Contradictory Evidence

Dental Crowding as a Risk Factor for Caries Is Yet To Be Established Due to Insufficient and Contradictory Evidence UTCAT3064, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Dental Crowding as a Risk Factor for Caries Is Yet To Be Established Due to Insufficient and Contradictory Evidence Clinical Question Are people with dental crowding more at risk for dental caries? Clinical Bottom Line A definitive association (...) between dental crowding and caries risk cannot be established due to conflicting evidence, confounding variables, and lack of longitudinal studies. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Hafez/2012 8 studies/9,266 patients reported Systematic review of cross-sectional studies Key results Four of the eight studies found no statistically significant correlation between dental caries and crowding

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2016

44. Allicin-Containing Foods May Reduce Caries

Allicin-Containing Foods May Reduce Caries UTCAT3026, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Allicin-Containing Foods May Reduce Caries Clinical Question Are foods containing allicin, which has antibacterial properties, effective in carries prevention? Clinical Bottom Line Allicin-containing foods may reduce caries. Research has shown the anti-microbial affects of allicin-containing foods (i.e., garlic (...) gingivalis and Aggrgatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Laboratory study Key results The study showed the significant inhibitory effect of garlic on oral pathogens, particularly P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. In the study, garlic extracts did not show any bactericidal activity towards the organisms; however, it did show bacteriostatic activity towards the organisms. Evidence Search (“Garlic”[Mesh] AND “Dental Caries”[Mesh]) (“garlic and toothbrush”) (“garlic and periodontal) Comments

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2016

45. Methamphetamine Use Is Associated with a Greater Incidence of Dental Caries

Methamphetamine Use Is Associated with a Greater Incidence of Dental Caries UTCAT3072, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Methamphetamine Use Is Associated with a Greater Incidence of Dental Caries Clinical Question In adult patients, does the use of methamphetamine increase the incidence of dental caries? Clinical Bottom Line For adult patients using methamphetamine there is an increase in the incidence (...) of dental caries. This is supported by two case control studies and one cross-sectional study that address dental caries in methamphetamine users, although the validity of the studies may be somewhat questionable. Both case control studies reveal that there is a higher incidence of caries in methamphetamine users. The cross-sectional study shows that there is consistency of the caries status found in methamphetamine users. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2016

46. Adhesively bonded versus non-bonded amalgam restorations for dental caries.

Adhesively bonded versus non-bonded amalgam restorations for dental caries. BACKGROUND: Dental caries (tooth decay) is one of the commonest diseases which afflicts mankind, and has been estimated to affect up to 80% of people in high-income countries. Caries adversely affects and progressively destroys the tissues of the tooth, including the dental pulp (nerve), leaving teeth unsightly, weakened and with impaired function. The treatment of lesions of dental caries, which are progressing through

Cochrane2016

47. Inadequate Evidence to Support a Correlation Between Maloccusion and Dental Caries Amongst Pediatric Patients

Inadequate Evidence to Support a Correlation Between Maloccusion and Dental Caries Amongst Pediatric Patients UTCAT3002, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Inadequate Evidence to Support a Correlation Between Maloccusion and Dental Caries Amongst Pediatric Patients Clinical Question Is a pediatric patient with moderate to severe malocclusion at a higher risk of developing dental caries than a patient (...) with normal occlusion? Clinical Bottom Line There is insufficient evidence to support a correlation between malocclusion and dental caries in pediatric patients. Although there were multiple cross-sectional studies that showed a correlation between malocclusion and caries, there are no higher quality longitudinal studies with prolonged follow-ups that support this claim. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2016

48. Non-Syndromic Patients With Cleft Lip And/Or Palate (CLP) Tend To Have Higher Caries Prevalence Than Non-CLP Patients

Non-Syndromic Patients With Cleft Lip And/Or Palate (CLP) Tend To Have Higher Caries Prevalence Than Non-CLP Patients UTCAT2989, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Non-Syndromic Patients With Cleft Lip And/Or Palate (CLP) Tend To Have Higher Caries Prevalence Than Non-CLP Patients Clinical Question In patients with non-syndromic cleft lip/cleft palate, is there greater predisposition to caries than in non (...) -CL/P patients? Clinical Bottom Line Non-syndromic patients with cleft lip and/or palate tend to have higher caries prevalence than non-CLP patients. This is supported by a meta-analysis of several cross-sectional trials in which the decayed, missing, and filled (DMF) index was significantly higher for CLP patients than non-CLP patients. This would suggest that dentists should factor in CLP while determining caries risk status for patients. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2016

49. Children With Poor Academic Performance Have A Higher Caries Risk

Children With Poor Academic Performance Have A Higher Caries Risk UTCAT3009, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Children With Poor Academic Performance Have A Higher Caries Risk Clinical Question Does a primary-age child’s academic performance level serve as an indicator for the child’s oral health status? Clinical Bottom Line There is a statistically significant (p Best Evidence (you may view more info (...) by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Garg/2012 600 primary and nursery school children aged 3-5 years old Cross-sectional Key results For primary school-aged children (n=600), a low academic performance score had a statistically significant (p 95% marks), average (50-95% marks), below average ( Evidence Search “academic performance” [Mesh] AND “caries risk” [Mesh] This article was found under “Similar Articles in PubMed”, so there were

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2016

50. Sealants for Preventing and Arresting Pit-and-fissure Occlusal Caries in Primary and Permanent Molars: A systematic Review

Sealants for Preventing and Arresting Pit-and-fissure Occlusal Caries in Primary and Permanent Molars: A systematic Review SYSTEMATIC REVIEW 282 SEALANTS’ SYSTEMATIC REVIEW PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY V 38 / NO 4 JUL / AUG 16 O 1 Dr. Wright is a Dr. James W. Bawden Distinguished Professor and the director of stra- tegic initiatives, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, N.C.; 2 Ms. Tampi is a research assistant, Center (...) ://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.adaj.2016.06.003. The articles are identical. Either citation can be used when citing this article. Sealants for Preventing and Arresting Pit-and-fissure Occlusal Caries in Primary and Permanent Molars A systematic review of randomized controlled trials—a report of the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry John T. Wright, DDS, MS 1 • Malavika P. Tampi, MPH 2 • Laurel Graham, MLS 3 • Cameron Estrich, MPH 4 • James J. Crall, DDS, MS, ScD 5

American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry2016

51. KHA-CARI guideline recommendations for the diagnosis and management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

KHA-CARI guideline recommendations for the diagnosis and management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease Original Article KHA-CARIguidelinerecommendationsforthediagnosisand managementofautosomaldominantpolycystickidneydisease GOPALA KRANGAN, 1,2 STEPHEN IALEXANDER, 3,4 KATRINA LCAMPBELL, 5,6 MARKAJDEXTER, 7 VINCENTW LEE, 1,2 PAMELA LOPEZ-VARGAS, 3,8 JUNMAI, 9 ANDREWMALLETT, 10,11,12 CHIRAG PATEL, 13 MANISHPATEL, 14,15 MICHELCTCHAN, 16,17 ALLISONTONG, 3,8 DAVIDJTUNNICLIFFE, 3,8 (...) ,ICAandpolycystic liverdisease.Knowledgeofthegeneticaspectsofthediseaseis variable. Studies also showed that quality of life is seriously affected, and patients suffer pain and experience social and psychologicalchanges,whichaffecttheiremotionalstate. Guidelinerecommendations The following statements are modi?ed from the KHA-CARI earlyCKDguidelinesonmodi?cationoflifestyleandnutrition interventions for management of early CKD, 35 as there is no evidencespeci?ctoADPKDthatwouldaltertheserecommen- dations:(http

KHA-CARI Guidelines2016

52. Effect of parent education on ways to prevent dental caries in pre-school children

Effect of parent education on ways to prevent dental caries in pre-school children Effect of parent education on ways to prevent dental caries in pre-school children - Nasjonalt kunnskapssenter for helsetjenesten Main menu Menu The Knowledge Centre for the Health Services is part of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health since January 1, 2016. For new publications, please go to Search Rapport fra Kunnskapssenteret - Systematisk oversikt Effect of parent education on ways to prevent dental (...) caries in pre-school children Published 30/11/2015 Mosdøl A, Forsetlund L, Strauman GH. Effect of parent education on ways to prevent dental caries in pre-school children. Rapport fra Kunnskapssenteret nr. 24 – 2015. ISBN 978-82-8121-991-5 ISSN 1890-1298 . Key messages Norwegian children typically have good dental health, but early childhood dental caries is a problem in some groups. Parents greatly influence what young children eat and drink and whether they clean their teeth. This report examines

The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services2015

53. Visual Inspection for Caries Remains The Clinical Diagnostic Standard

Visual Inspection for Caries Remains The Clinical Diagnostic Standard UTCAT2955, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Visual Inspection for Caries Remains The Clinical Diagnostic Standard Clinical Question For an average adult patient, is visual inspection alone sufficient to accurately diagnose non-proximal caries? Clinical Bottom Line Visualization inspection alone is a reliable method to diagnose caries (...) . A meta-analysis and systematic review reached that same basic conclusion. However, the evidence demonstrates moderate heterogeneity and publication bias. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Gimenez/ 2015 102 articles Meta-Analysis Key results Visual inspection of lesions demonstrates a good level of accuracy and high specificity in the diagnosis of caries. Validated visual scoring

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2015

54. Secondhand smoke and incidence of dental caries in deciduous teeth among children in Japan: population based retrospective cohort study.

Secondhand smoke and incidence of dental caries in deciduous teeth among children in Japan: population based retrospective cohort study. STUDY QUESTION: Does maternal smoking during pregnancy and exposure of infants to tobacco smoke at age 4 months increase the risk of caries in deciduous teeth? METHODS: Population based retrospective cohort study of 76 920 children born between 2004 and 2010 in Kobe City, Japan who received municipal health check-ups at birth, 4, 9, and 18 months, and 3 years (...) and had information on household smoking status at age 4 months and records of dental examinations at age 18 months and 3 years. Smoking during pregnancy and exposure of infants to secondhand smoke at age 4 months was assessed by standardised parent reported questionnaires. The main outcome measure was the incidence of caries in deciduous teeth, defined as at least one decayed, missing, or filled tooth assessed by qualified dentists without radiographs. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard

BMJ2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

55. What are effective methods to reduce the incidence of caries?

What are effective methods to reduce the incidence of caries? What are effective methods to reduce the incidence of caries? Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics What are effective methods to reduce the incidence of caries? View/ Open Date 2015-09 Format Metadata Abstract What are effective methods to reduce (...) the incidence of caries? Evidence-Based Answer: Toothpastes with fluoride concentrations of 1,000 to 2,800 parts per million (ppm) reduce the incidence of caries in children aged greater-than or equal to 16 years (SOR: A, metaanalysis of RCTs). Oral fluoride supplementation reduces the incidence of caries in permanent teeth for children aged 6 to 16 years. However, oral fluoride supplementation is not more effective than fluoride toothpastes or topical fluorides (SOR: B, meta-analysis of RCTs at risk

Evidence Based Practice 2015

56. Silver Diamine Fluoride May Be Better Than Sodium Fluoride Varnish In Arresting and Preventing Cavitated Caries Lesions

Silver Diamine Fluoride May Be Better Than Sodium Fluoride Varnish In Arresting and Preventing Cavitated Caries Lesions UTCAT2924, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Silver Diamine Fluoride May Be Better Than Sodium Fluoride Varnish In Arresting and Preventing Cavitated Caries Lesions Clinical Question In high caries risk children, is Silver Diamine Fluoride solution compared to Sodium Fluoride varnish (...) , more effective in preventing/arresting caries? Clinical Bottom Line Both annual application of 38% Silver Diamine Fluoride (SDF) solution and biannual application of 5% Sodium Fluoride varnish (NaF) are clinically effective in arresting and preventing progression of caries lesions in the primary dentition and pits/fissures of permanent first molars, with no significant difference from one another in their effectiveness. There is some evidence supporting the use of SDF over NaF varnish with most

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2015

57. Interim Stabilization Therapy for Patients with Dental Caries: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

Interim Stabilization Therapy for Patients with Dental Caries: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Interim Stabilization Therapy for Patients with Dental Caries: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Interim Stabilization Therapy for Patients with Dental Caries: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Interim Stabilization Therapy for Patients with Dental Caries: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Published on: September 2, 2015 Project Number: RA0786 (...) -000 Product Line: Research Type: Devices and Systems Report Type: Reference List Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of interim stabilization therapy or interim therapeutic restorations for patients with dental caries? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of interim stabilization therapy or interim therapeutic restorations for patients with dental caries? Key Message One randomized controlled trial, two non-randomized studies, and five evidence

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review2015

58. Fluoridated milk for preventing dental caries.

Fluoridated milk for preventing dental caries. BACKGROUND: Dental caries remains a major public health problem in most industrialised countries, affecting 60% to 90% of schoolchildren and the vast majority of adults. Milk may provide a relatively cost-effective vehicle for fluoride delivery in the prevention of dental caries. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2005. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of milk fluoridation for preventing dental caries at a community level (...) included one unpublished RCT, randomising 180 children aged three years at study commencement. The setting was nursery schools in an area with high prevalence of dental caries and a low level of fluoride in drinking water. Data from 166 participants were available for analysis. The study carried a high risk of bias. After three years, there was a reduction of caries in permanent teeth (mean difference (MD) -0.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.24 to -0.02) and in primary teeth (MD -1.14, 95% CI -1.86

Cochrane2015

59. Fluoridated milk for preventing dental caries.

Fluoridated milk for preventing dental caries. BACKGROUND: Dental caries remains a major public health problem in most industrialised countries, affecting 60% to 90% of schoolchildren and the vast majority of adults. Milk may provide a relatively cost-effective vehicle for fluoride delivery in the prevention of dental caries. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2005. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of milk fluoridation for preventing dental caries at a community level (...) included one unpublished RCT, randomising 180 children aged three years at study commencement. The setting was nursery schools in an area with high prevalence of dental caries and a low level of fluoride in drinking water. Data from 166 participants were available for analysis. The study carried a high risk of bias. After three years, there was a reduction of caries in permanent teeth (mean difference (MD) -0.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.24 to -0.02) and in primary teeth (MD -1.14, 95% CI -1.86

Cochrane2015