Latest & greatest articles for cardiovascular disease

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Top results for cardiovascular disease

61. Screening for Cardiovascular Disease Risk With Resting or Exercise Electrocardiography: Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force.

Screening for Cardiovascular Disease Risk With Resting or Exercise Electrocardiography: Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force. Importance: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. Objective: To review the evidence on screening asymptomatic adults for CVD risk using electrocardiography (ECG) to inform the US Preventive Services Task Force. Data Sources: MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and trial registries through May (...) of abstracts, full-text articles, and study quality; qualitative synthesis of findings. Main Outcomes and Measures: Mortality, cardiovascular events, reclassification, calibration, discrimination, and harms. Results: Sixteen studies were included (N = 77 140). Two RCTs (n = 1151) found no significant improvement for screening with exercise ECG (vs no screening) in adults aged 50 to 75 years with diabetes for the primary cardiovascular composite outcomes (hazard ratios, 1.00 [95% CI, 0.59-1.71] and 0.85 [95

JAMA2018

62. Screening for Cardiovascular Disease Risk With Electrocardiography: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

Screening for Cardiovascular Disease Risk With Electrocardiography: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Importance: Cardiovascular disease (CVD), which encompasses atherosclerotic conditions such as coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease, is the most common cause of death among adults in the United States. Treatment to prevent CVD events by modifying risk factors is currently informed by CVD risk assessment with tools (...) such as the Framingham Risk Score or the Pooled Cohort Equations, which stratify individual risk to inform treatment decisions. Objective: To update the 2012 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for coronary heart disease with electrocardiography (ECG). Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on whether screening with resting or exercise ECG improves health outcomes compared with the use of traditional CVD risk assessment alone in asymptomatic adults. Findings

JAMA2018

63. Clinical Implications of Revised Pooled Cohort Equations for Estimating Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk.

Clinical Implications of Revised Pooled Cohort Equations for Estimating Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk. Background: The 2013 pooled cohort equations (PCEs) are central in prevention guidelines for cardiovascular disease (CVD) but can misestimate CVD risk. Objective: To improve the clinical accuracy of CVD risk prediction by revising the 2013 PCEs using newer data and statistical methods. Design: Derivation and validation of risk equations. Setting: Population-based. Participants (...) : 26 689 adults aged 40 to 79 years without prior CVD from 6 U.S. cohorts. Measurements: Nonfatal myocardial infarction, death from coronary heart disease, or fatal or nonfatal stroke. Results: The 2013 PCEs overestimated 10-year risk for atherosclerotic CVD by an average of 20% across risk groups. Misestimation of risk was particularly prominent among black adults, of whom 3.9 million (33% of eligible black persons) had extreme risk estimates (<70% or >250% those of white adults

Annals of Internal Medicine2018

64. Genetics of Cardiovascular Disease: Fishing for Causality

Genetics of Cardiovascular Disease: Fishing for Causality 29911105 2018 11 14 2297-055X 5 2018 Frontiers in cardiovascular medicine Front Cardiovasc Med Genetics of Cardiovascular Disease: Fishing for Causality. 60 10.3389/fcvm.2018.00060 Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is still the leading cause of death in all western world countries and genetic predisposition in combination with traditional risk factors frequently mediates their manifestation. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies revealed (...) . In this review, we focus on the use of functional genomic approaches such as gene knock-down or CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing in the zebrafish model to validate disease-associated genomic loci and to identify novel cardiovascular disease genes. We summarize the benefits of the zebrafish for cardiovascular research and highlight examples demonstrating the successful combination of GWA studies and functional genomics in zebrafish to broaden our knowledge on the genetic and molecular underpinnings

Frontiers in cardiovascular medicine2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

65. Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Screening With Electrocardiography

Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Screening With Electrocardiography Final Recommendation Statement: Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Screening With Electrocardiography - US Preventive Services Task Force Search USPSTF Website Text size: Assembly version: 1.0.0.308 Last Build: 3/6/2018 4:20:40 PM You are here: Final Recommendation Statement : Final Recommendation Statement Final Recommendation Statement Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Screening With Electrocardiography Recommendations made by the USPSTF (...) are independent of the U.S. government. They should not be construed as an official position of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Recommendation Summary Population Recommendation Grade Adults at low risk of CVD events The USPSTF recommends against screening with resting or exercise electrocardiography (ECG) to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in asymptomatic adults at low risk of CVD events. Adults at intermediate or high risk of CVD

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force2018

66. Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease in South Asians in the United States: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Treatments: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease in South Asians in the United States: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Treatments: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease in South Asians in the United States: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Treatments: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association | Circulation Search for this keyword Search Search for this keyword Search Header Publisher Menu AHA Scientific Statement Atherosclerotic (...) Cardiovascular Disease in South Asians in the United States: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Treatments: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Annabelle Santos Volgman , Latha S. Palaniappan , Neelum T. Aggarwal , Milan Gupta , Abha Khandelwal , Aruna V. Krishnan , Judith H. Lichtman , Laxmi S. Mehta , Hena N. Patel , Kevin S. Shah , Svati H. Shah , Karol E. Watson , On behalf of the American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in

American Heart Association2018

67. Seafood Long-Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association

Seafood Long-Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association Seafood Long-Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association | Circulation Search for this keyword Search Search for this keyword Search Header Publisher Menu AHA Science Advisory Seafood Long-Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: A Science Advisory From (...) the American Heart Association Eric B. Rimm , Lawrence J. Appel , Stephanie E. Chiuve , Luc Djoussé , Mary B. Engler , Penny M. Kris-Etherton , Dariush Mozaffarian , David S. Siscovick , Alice H. Lichtenstein , On behalf of the American Heart Association Nutrition Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; and Council on Clinical Cardiology https

American Heart Association2018

68. Health Literacy and Cardiovascular Disease: Fundamental Relevance to Primary and Secondary Prevention: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

Health Literacy and Cardiovascular Disease: Fundamental Relevance to Primary and Secondary Prevention: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Health Literacy and Cardiovascular Disease: Fundamental Relevance to Primary and Secondary Prevention: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association | Circulation Search for this keyword Search Search for this keyword Search Header Publisher Menu AHA Scientific Statement Health Literacy and Cardiovascular Disease (...) : Fundamental Relevance to Primary and Secondary Prevention: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Jared W. Magnani , Mahasin S. Mujahid , Herbert D. Aronow , Crystal W. Cené , Victoria Vaughan Dickson , Edward Havranek , Lewis B. Morgenstern , Michael K. Paasche-Orlow , Amy Pollak , Joshua Z. Willey , On behalf of the American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; Council

American Heart Association2018

69. Promoting Risk Identification and Reduction of Cardiovascular Disease in Women Through Collaboration With Obstetricians and Gynecologists: A Presidential Advisory From the American Heart Association and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologi

Promoting Risk Identification and Reduction of Cardiovascular Disease in Women Through Collaboration With Obstetricians and Gynecologists: A Presidential Advisory From the American Heart Association and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologi Promoting Risk Identification and Reduction of Cardiovascular Disease in Women Through Collaboration With Obstetricians and Gynecologists: A Presidential Advisory From the American Heart Association and the American College of Obstetricians (...) and Gynecolog… | Circulation Search for this keyword Search Search for this keyword Search Header Publisher Menu Clinical Statements and Guidelines Promoting Risk Identification and Reduction of Cardiovascular Disease in Women Through Collaboration With Obstetricians and Gynecologists: A Presidential Advisory From the American Heart Association and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Haywood L. Brown , John J. Warner , Eugenia Gianos , Martha Gulati , Alexandria J. Hill , Lisa M. Hollier

American Heart Association2018

70. Inhibition of Interleukin-1beta by Canakinumab and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

Inhibition of Interleukin-1beta by Canakinumab and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease 29793629 2018 05 25 1558-3597 71 21 2018 May 29 Journal of the American College of Cardiology J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. Inhibition of Interleukin-1β by Canakinumab and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease. 2405-2414 S0735-1097(18)34271-2 10.1016/j.jacc.2018.03.490 Inflammation contributes to chronic kidney disease (CKD), in part mediated through activation (...) for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: pridker@bwh.harvard.edu. MacFadyen Jean G JG Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Glynn Robert J RJ Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical

EvidenceUpdates2018

71. Severe and predominantly active atopic eczema in adulthood and long term risk of cardiovascular disease: population based cohort study.

Severe and predominantly active atopic eczema in adulthood and long term risk of cardiovascular disease: population based cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether adults with atopic eczema are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and whether the risk varies by atopic eczema severity and condition activity over time. DESIGN: Population based matched cohort study. SETTING: UK electronic health records from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, Hospital Episode Statistics (...) and predominantly active atopic eczema are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular outcomes. Targeting cardiovascular disease prevention strategies among these patients should be considered. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

BMJ2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

72. Cardiovascular disease risk prediction equations in 400 000 primary care patients in New Zealand: a derivation and validation study.

Cardiovascular disease risk prediction equations in 400 000 primary care patients in New Zealand: a derivation and validation study. BACKGROUND: Most cardiovascular disease risk prediction equations in use today were derived from cohorts established last century and with participants at higher risk but less socioeconomically and ethnically diverse than patients they are now applied to. We recruited a nationally representative cohort in New Zealand to develop equations relevant to patients (...) in contemporary primary care and compared the performance of these new equations to equations that are recommended in the USA. METHODS: The PREDICT study automatically recruits participants in routine primary care when general practitioners in New Zealand use PREDICT software to assess their patients' risk profiles for cardiovascular disease, which are prospectively linked to national ICD-coded hospitalisation and mortality databases. The study population included male and female patients in primary care who

Lancet2018

73. The Burden of Cardiovascular Diseases Among US States, 1990-2016

The Burden of Cardiovascular Diseases Among US States, 1990-2016 29641820 2018 11 14 2380-6591 3 5 2018 May 01 JAMA cardiology JAMA Cardiol The Burden of Cardiovascular Diseases Among US States, 1990-2016. 375-389 10.1001/jamacardio.2018.0385 Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States, but regional variation within the United States is large. Comparable and consistent state-level measures of total CVD burden and risk factors have not been produced previously (...) . To quantify and describe levels and trends of lost health due to CVD within the United States from 1990 to 2016 as well as risk factors driving these changes. Using the Global Burden of Disease methodology, cardiovascular disease mortality, nonfatal health outcomes, and associated risk factors were analyzed by age group, sex, and year from 1990 to 2016 for all residents in the United States using standardized approaches for data processing and statistical modeling. Burden of disease was estimated for 10

JAMA cardiology2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

74. Cardiovascular Disease and Risk Management: Review of the American Diabetes Association Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2018.

Cardiovascular Disease and Risk Management: Review of the American Diabetes Association Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2018. Description: The American Diabetes Association (ADA) annually updates its Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payers, and other interested parties with evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with diabetes. Methods: For the 2018 standards, the ADA Professional Practice Committee (...) : This synopsis focuses on guidance relating to cardiovascular disease and risk management in nonpregnant adults with diabetes. Recommendations address diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension and dyslipidemia), aspirin use, screening for and treatment of coronary heart disease, and lifestyle interventions.

Annals of Internal Medicine2018

75. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Cardiovascular Disease Modeling and Precision Medicine: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Cardiovascular Disease Modeling and Precision Medicine: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Cardiovascular Disease Modeling and Precision Medicine: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association | Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine Search for this keyword Search Search for this keyword Search Header Publisher Menu AHA Scientific Statement Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (...) for Cardiovascular Disease Modeling and Precision Medicine: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Kiran Musunuru , Farah Sheikh , Rajat M. Gupta , Steven R. Houser , Kevin O. Maher , David J. Milan , Andre Terzic , Joseph C. Wu and On behalf of the American Heart Association Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; and Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing https://doi.org/10.1161/HCG.0000000000000043 Circ Genom Precis

American Heart Association2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

76. Improving medication adherence in patients with cardiovascular disease: a systematic review

Improving medication adherence in patients with cardiovascular disease: a systematic review 29572248 2018 03 24 1468-201X 2018 Mar 23 Heart (British Cardiac Society) Heart Improving medication adherence in patients with cardiovascular disease: a systematic review. heartjnl-2017-312571 10.1136/heartjnl-2017-312571 To evaluate and compare the effect of interventions for improving adherence to medications for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) secondary prevention. We extracted (...) eligible trials from a 2014 Cochrane systematic review on adherence for any condition. We updated the search from CENTRAL, Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Sociological Abstracts and trial registers through November 2016. Study reports needed to be from a randomised controlled trial, incorporate participants identified as having ASCVD and interventions aimed at improving adherence to medicines for secondary prevention of ASCVD and measure both adherence and a clinical outcome. Two reviewers

EvidenceUpdates2018

77. Trends in Racial/Ethnic and Nativity Disparities in Cardiovascular Health Among Adults Without Prevalent Cardiovascular Disease in the United States, 1988 to 2014.

Trends in Racial/Ethnic and Nativity Disparities in Cardiovascular Health Among Adults Without Prevalent Cardiovascular Disease in the United States, 1988 to 2014. Background: Trends in cardiovascular disparities are poorly understood, even as diversity increases in the United States. Objective: To examine U.S. trends in racial/ethnic and nativity disparities in cardiovascular health. Design: Repeated cross-sectional study. Setting: NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (...) ), 1988 to 2014. Participants: Adults aged 25 years or older who did not report cardiovascular disease. Measurements: Racial/ethnic, nativity, and period differences in Life's Simple 7 (LS7) health factors and behaviors (blood pressure, cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, body mass index, physical activity, diet, and smoking) and optimal composite scores for cardiovascular health (LS7 score ≥10). Results: Rates of optimal cardiovascular health remain below 40% among whites, 25% among Mexican Americans

Annals of Internal Medicine2018

78. Intrauterine growth restriction - impact on cardiovascular diseases later in life

Intrauterine growth restriction - impact on cardiovascular diseases later in life 29560535 2018 11 14 2194-7791 5 1 2018 Mar 20 Molecular and cellular pediatrics Mol Cell Pediatr Intrauterine growth restriction - impact on cardiovascular diseases later in life. 4 10.1186/s40348-018-0082-5 Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a fetal pathology which leads to increased risk for certain neonatal complications. Furthermore, clinical and experimental studies revealed that IUGR is associated (...) with a significantly higher incidence of metabolic, renal and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) later in life. One hypothesis for the higher risk of CVD after IUGR postulates that IUGR induces metabolic alterations that then lead to CVD.This minireview focuses on recent studies which demonstrate that IUGR is followed by early primary cardiovascular alterations which may directly progress to CVD later in life. Menendez-Castro Carlos C Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg

Molecular and cellular pediatrics2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

79. Vascular Senescence in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases

Vascular Senescence in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases Frontiers | Vascular Senescence in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases | Cardiovascular Medicine Toggle navigation Login using You can login by using one of your existing accounts. We will be provided with an authorization token (please note: passwords are not shared with us) and will sync your accounts for you. This means that you will not need to remember your user name and password in the future and you will be able to login (...) . TABLE OF CONTENTS Supplementary Material total views SHARE ON Review ARTICLE Front. Cardiovasc. Med., 05 March 2018 | Vascular Senescence in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases 1† , 1,2† , 1,2 and 1* 1 Department of Cardiovascular Biology and Medicine, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata, Japan 2 Division of Molecular Aging and Cell Biology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata, Japan In mammals, aging is associated

Frontiers in cardiovascular medicine2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

80. Fluticasone Furoate, Vilanterol, and Lung Function Decline in Patients with Moderate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Heightened Cardiovascular Risk

Fluticasone Furoate, Vilanterol, and Lung Function Decline in Patients with Moderate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Heightened Cardiovascular Risk 28737971 2018 01 24 1535-4970 197 1 2018 Jan 01 American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. Fluticasone Furoate, Vilanterol, and Lung Function Decline in Patients with Moderate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Heightened Cardiovascular Risk. 47-55 10.1164/rccm.201610-2086OC Many (...) in FEV 1 compared with placebo. We also investigated how baseline covariates affected this decline. Spirometry was measured every 12 weeks in this event-driven, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of 16,485 patients with moderate COPD and heightened cardiovascular risk. An average of seven spirometric assessments per subject among the 15,457 patients with at least one on-treatment measurement were used in the analysis of rate of FEV 1 decline. All statistical comparisons are considered nominal

EvidenceUpdates2018