Latest & greatest articles for cardiac arrest

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Top results for cardiac arrest

161. Gender-related outcomes with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Gender-related outcomes with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web (...) at multiple time points, data from the time point where efficacy is highest will be included. ">Methods for data extraction Example: Experimental groups, control group(s) and number of animals per group. ">Data to be extracted: study design Example: Species, sex, weight, age, co‐morbidity, anaesthetic agent used, method of induction of cardiac ischemia, duration of ischemia and duration of reperfusion (if applicable). ">Data to be extracted: animal model Example: Dose, timing of administration, frequency

2018 PROSPERO

162. Systematic review and meta-analysis of surface vs. Intravascular methods of induced hypothermia in patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest

Systematic review and meta-analysis of surface vs. Intravascular methods of induced hypothermia in patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne (...) ). In case an outcome is measured at multiple time points, data from the time point where efficacy is highest will be included. ">Methods for data extraction Example: Experimental groups, control group(s) and number of animals per group. ">Data to be extracted: study design Example: Species, sex, weight, age, co‐morbidity, anaesthetic agent used, method of induction of cardiac ischemia, duration of ischemia and duration of reperfusion (if applicable). ">Data to be extracted: animal model Example: Dose

2018 PROSPERO

163. Infrared pupillometry to help predict neurological outcome for patients achieving return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) following cardiac arrest: systematic review

Infrared pupillometry to help predict neurological outcome for patients achieving return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) following cardiac arrest: systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g (...) authors by e-mail (max. 2 attempts). In case an outcome is measured at multiple time points, data from the time point where efficacy is highest will be included. ">Methods for data extraction Example: Experimental groups, control group(s) and number of animals per group. ">Data to be extracted: study design Example: Species, sex, weight, age, co‐morbidity, anaesthetic agent used, method of induction of cardiac ischemia, duration of ischemia and duration of reperfusion (if applicable). ">Data

2018 PROSPERO

164. Vasopressors during adult cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Vasopressors during adult cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing (...) at multiple time points, data from the time point where efficacy is highest will be included. ">Methods for data extraction Example: Experimental groups, control group(s) and number of animals per group. ">Data to be extracted: study design Example: Species, sex, weight, age, co‐morbidity, anaesthetic agent used, method of induction of cardiac ischemia, duration of ischemia and duration of reperfusion (if applicable). ">Data to be extracted: animal model Example: Dose, timing of administration, frequency

2018 PROSPERO

165. Advanced airway management during adult cardiac arrest: a systematic review

Advanced airway management during adult cardiac arrest: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect (...) points, data from the time point where efficacy is highest will be included. ">Methods for data extraction Example: Experimental groups, control group(s) and number of animals per group. ">Data to be extracted: study design Example: Species, sex, weight, age, co‐morbidity, anaesthetic agent used, method of induction of cardiac ischemia, duration of ischemia and duration of reperfusion (if applicable). ">Data to be extracted: animal model Example: Dose, timing of administration, frequency

2018 PROSPERO

166. Identifying potential and existing quality indicators in adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest care

Identifying potential and existing quality indicators in adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest care Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web (...) at multiple time points, data from the time point where efficacy is highest will be included. ">Methods for data extraction Example: Experimental groups, control group(s) and number of animals per group. ">Data to be extracted: study design Example: Species, sex, weight, age, co‐morbidity, anaesthetic agent used, method of induction of cardiac ischemia, duration of ischemia and duration of reperfusion (if applicable). ">Data to be extracted: animal model Example: Dose, timing of administration, frequency

2018 PROSPERO

167. Epinephrine for out of hospital cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Epinephrine for out of hospital cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence (...) an outcome is measured at multiple time points, data from the time point where efficacy is highest will be included. ">Methods for data extraction Example: Experimental groups, control group(s) and number of animals per group. ">Data to be extracted: study design Example: Species, sex, weight, age, co‐morbidity, anaesthetic agent used, method of induction of cardiac ischemia, duration of ischemia and duration of reperfusion (if applicable). ">Data to be extracted: animal model Example: Dose, timing

2018 PROSPERO

168. Cardiac arrest - out of hospital care

Cardiac arrest - out of hospital care Cardiac arrest - out of hospital care - NICE CKS Share Cardiac arrest - out of hospital care: Summary Cardiac arrest is a sudden state of circulatory failure due to a loss of cardiac systolic function. There are around 60,000 cases of suspected cardiac arrest every year, but fewer than 1 in 10 people survive an out of hospital cardiac arrest. Immediate initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can double or quadruple survival from out hospital (...) cardiac arrest, and defibrillation within 3–5 minutes of collapse can produce survival rates up to 50–70%. Cardiac arrest should be suspected if a person is unresponsive and not breathing normally. An inital safety assessment should be undertaken before approaching the person. Assessment of normal breathing should be performed, whilst keeping the airway open by turning the person onto their back and gently tilting their head back and lifting their chin. If there is no response and the person

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

169. Comparison of the Between the Flags calling criteria to the MEWS, NEWS and the electronic Cardiac Arrest Risk Triage (eCART) score for the identification of deteriorating ward patients Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comparison of the Between the Flags calling criteria to the MEWS, NEWS and the electronic Cardiac Arrest Risk Triage (eCART) score for the identification of deteriorating ward patients Traditionally, paper based observation charts have been used to identify deteriorating patients, with emerging recent electronic medical records allowing electronic algorithms to risk stratify and help direct the response to deterioration.We sought to compare the Between the Flags (BTF) calling criteria (...) to the Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS), National Early Warning Score (NEWS) and electronic Cardiac Arrest Risk Triage (eCART) score.Multicenter retrospective analysis of electronic health record data from all patients admitted to five US hospitals from November 2008-August 2013.Cardiac arrest, ICU transfer or death within 24h of a score RESULTS: Overall accuracy was highest for eCART, with an AUC of 0.801 (95% CI 0.799-0.802), followed by NEWS, MEWS and BTF respectively (0.718 [0.716-0.720]; 0.698 [0.696

2018 EvidenceUpdates

170. Epinephrine in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Epinephrine in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Epinephrine in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest | Emergency Medicine | Washington University in St. Louis Open Menu Back Close Menu Search for: Loading... Welcome Sections Education Fellowships Research Journal Club Events Open Search Vignette You are doing an EMS ride-along during your EMS elective and get a call for a 70- year old male in cardiac arrest. The paramedic hits the lights and sirens and you’re on scene in five minutes. The ?ire (...) continuing good, uninterrupted chest compressions. He gets two more rounds of epi en route and gets a pulse back. On arrival to the ED he has a pulse, is mildly hypotensive, but has no spontaneous breaths and his pupils are fixed and dilated. You know that giving epinephrine in cardiac arrest is the standard of care, but wonder what effect it really has: does it improve ROSC, and if so does it actually improve neurologic function down the road. You wonder if their is really any evidence to support its

2018 Washington University Emergency Medicine Journal Club

171. Treatment of a patient with acute aortic dissection using extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation after an out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest: a case report Full Text available with Trip Pro

Treatment of a patient with acute aortic dissection using extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation after an out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest: a case report Circulatory support using veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for aortic disease is conventionally contraindicated. In this case, a 66-year-old man experienced cardiopulmonary arrest caused by acute aortic dissection. When exercising in the gym, he experienced chest discomfort, so the staff immediately called an ambulance (...) prosthesis implantation was performed. The patient received intensive care and was discharged on day 49 of hospitalization. His cerebral performance category score was 4 at discharge.This case suggests that veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation may be used for patients with aortic dissection presenting with cardiac arrest.

2017 Acute medicine & surgery

172. Case Report: Toxin-Induced Cardiac Arrest in Game of Thrones

Case Report: Toxin-Induced Cardiac Arrest in Game of Thrones Case Report: Toxin-Induced Cardiac Arrest in Game of Thrones - CanadiEM Case Report: Toxin-Induced Cardiac Arrest in Game of Thrones In , by Will Wu December 12, 2017 King Joffrey I Baratheon was found in respiratory distress by his mother, Cersei Lannister, and Jaime Lannister during his wedding to Margaery Tyrell. As this was the wedding for the King of the Seven Kingdoms, numerous guests and bystanders were present. The patient (...) the specific management strategies of toxin-induced cardiac arrest and why we believe the resuscitative attempt (or lack thereof) for Joffrey demonstrated in this case was poor, even for a peasant, let alone the King of the Seven Kingdoms. He would have benefited from receiving proper supportive care with support from a Maester at King’s Landing and from emergency consultation with a Maester with expertise in posions. While the epidemiology of toxin-induced cardiac arrest (TICA) is understudied

2017 CandiEM

173. Targeted Temperature Management for 48 vs 24 Hours and Neurologic Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Targeted Temperature Management for 48 vs 24 Hours and Neurologic Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized Clinical Trial PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2017 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

174. Prehospital cooling to improve successful targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest: A randomized controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prehospital cooling to improve successful targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest: A randomized controlled trial Targeted temperature management (TTM) improves survival with good neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), but is delivered inconsistently and often with delay.To determine if prehospital cooling by paramedics leads to higher rates of 'successful TTM', defined as achieving a target temperature of 32-34°C within 6h of hospital arrival.Pragmatic (...) RCT comparing prehospital cooling (surface ice packs, cold saline infusion, wristband reminders) initiated 5min after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) versus usual resuscitation and transport. The primary outcome was rate of 'successful TTM'; secondary outcomes were rates of applying TTM in hospital, survival with good neurological outcome, pulmonary edema in emergency department, and re-arrest during transport.585 patients were randomized to receive prehospital cooling (n=279) or control

2017 EvidenceUpdates

175. A user-friendly risk-score for predicting in-hospital cardiac arrest among patients admitted with suspected non ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome - The SAFER-score Full Text available with Trip Pro

A user-friendly risk-score for predicting in-hospital cardiac arrest among patients admitted with suspected non ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome - The SAFER-score To develop a simple risk-score model for predicting in-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) among patients hospitalized with suspected non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS).Using the Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies

2017 EvidenceUpdates

176. Sudden Cardiac Arrest during Participation in Competitive Sports. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Sudden Cardiac Arrest during Participation in Competitive Sports. The incidence of sudden cardiac arrest during participation in sports activities remains unknown. Preparticipation screening programs aimed at preventing sudden cardiac arrest during sports activities are thought to be able to identify at-risk athletes; however, the efficacy of these programs remains controversial. We sought to identify all sudden cardiac arrests that occurred during participation in sports activities within (...) a specific region of Canada and to determine their causes.In this retrospective study, we used the Rescu Epistry cardiac arrest database (which contains records of every cardiac arrest attended by paramedics in the network region) to identify all out-of-hospital cardiac arrests that occurred from 2009 through 2014 in persons 12 to 45 years of age during participation in a sport. Cases were adjudicated as sudden cardiac arrest (i.e., having a cardiac cause) or as an event resulting from a noncardiac cause

2017 NEJM

177. Association of Public Health Initiatives With Outcomes for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest at Home and in Public Locations Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association of Public Health Initiatives With Outcomes for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest at Home and in Public Locations Little is known about the influence of comprehensive public health initiatives according to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) location, particularly at home, where resuscitation efforts and outcomes have historically been poor.To describe temporal trends in bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first-responder defibrillation for OHCAs stratified by home vs (...) public location and their association with survival and neurological outcomes.This observational study reviewed 8269 patients with OHCAs (5602 [67.7%] at home and 2667 [32.3%] in public) for whom resuscitation was attempted using data from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2014. The setting was 16 counties in North Carolina.Patients were stratified by home vs public OHCA. Public health initiatives to improve bystander and first

2017 JAMA cardiology

178. Hypothermia or normothermia to improve survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest?

Hypothermia or normothermia to improve survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest? Hypothermia or normothermia to improve survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest? - Evidencias en pediatría Searching, please wait Show menu Library Management You did not add any article to your library yet. | Search Evidence-Based decision making Evidence-Based decision making Show menu Library Management You did not add any article to your library yet. × User Password Log in × Reset password If you need (...) to reset your password please enter your email and click the Send button. You will receive an email to complete the process. Email Send × Library Management × September 2017. Volume 13. Number 3 Hypothermia or normothermia to improve survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest? Rating: 0 (0 Votes) Reviewers: , . | Newsletter Free Subscription Regularly recieve most recent articles by e-mail Subscribe × Newsletter subscription: Email Confirm email I accept the journal’s privacy policy. Subscribe

2017 Evidencias en Pediatría

179. Reliability of Administrative Codes for Capturing In-hospital Cardiac Arrest Full Text available with Trip Pro

Reliability of Administrative Codes for Capturing In-hospital Cardiac Arrest 28877294 2018 11 13 2380-6591 2 11 2017 Nov 01 JAMA cardiology JAMA Cardiol Administrative Codes for Capturing In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. 1275-1277 10.1001/jamacardio.2017.2904 Khera Rohan R Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. Spertus John A JA Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, Missouri. Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine

2017 JAMA cardiology

180. Continuous versus intermittent neuromuscular blockade in patients during targeted temperature management after resuscitation from cardiac arrest-A randomized, double blinded, double dummy, clinical trial (Abstract)

Continuous versus intermittent neuromuscular blockade in patients during targeted temperature management after resuscitation from cardiac arrest-A randomized, double blinded, double dummy, clinical trial Current guidelines recommend targeted temperature management to improve neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. Evidence regarding an ideal sedative/analgesic regimen including skeletal muscle paralysis is limited.Patients were randomized to either a continuous administration of rocuronium (...) (continuous-NMB-group) or to a continuous administration of saline supplemented by rocuronium bolus administration if demanded (bolus-NMB-group). The primary outcome was the number of shivering episodes. Secondary outcomes included survival and neurological status one year after cardiac arrest, time to awakening, length of stay as well as required cumulative dose of rocuronium, midazolam and fentanyl.Sixty-three patients (32 continuous-NMB-group; 31 bolus-NMB-group) were enrolled. Differences in baseline

2017 EvidenceUpdates