Latest & greatest articles for cardiac arrest

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Top results for cardiac arrest

261. Delayed time to defibrillation after in-hospital cardiac arrest.

Delayed time to defibrillation after in-hospital cardiac arrest. BACKGROUND: Expert guidelines advocate defibrillation within 2 minutes after an in-hospital cardiac arrest caused by ventricular arrhythmia. However, empirical data on the prevalence of delayed defibrillation in the United States and its effect on survival are limited. METHODS: We identified 6789 patients who had cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia at 369 hospitals participating (...) (30.1%). Characteristics associated with delayed defibrillation included black race, noncardiac admitting diagnosis, and occurrence of cardiac arrest at a hospital with fewer than 250 beds, in an unmonitored hospital unit, and during after-hours periods (5 p.m. to 8 a.m. or weekends). Delayed defibrillation was associated with a significantly lower probability of surviving to hospital discharge (22.2%, vs. 39.3% when defibrillation was not delayed; adjusted odds ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval

NEJM2008

262. ResQPOD impedance threshhold device for cardiac arrest

ResQPOD impedance threshhold device for cardiac arrest ResQPOD impedance threshhold device for cardiac arrest ResQPOD impedance threshhold device for cardiac arrest Purins A, Mundy L, Hiller JE Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Purins A, Mundy L, Hiller JE. ResQPOD impedance threshhold device for cardiac arrest. Adelaide (...) : Adelaide Health Technology Assessment (AHTA). Prioritising Summary. Volume 21. 2008 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; Heart Arrests Language Published English Country of organisation Australia English summary An English language summary is available. Address for correspondence Adelaide Health Technology Assessment, University of Adelaide, Discipline of Public Health, School of Population Health and Clinical Practice, Mail Drop

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2008

263. Is the combination of vasopressin and epinephrine superior to repeated doses of epinephrine alone in the treatment of cardiac arrest? A systematic review

Is the combination of vasopressin and epinephrine superior to repeated doses of epinephrine alone in the treatment of cardiac arrest? A systematic review Is the combination of vasopressin and epinephrine superior to repeated doses of epinephrine alone in the treatment of cardiac arrest? A systematic review Is the combination of vasopressin and epinephrine superior to repeated doses of epinephrine alone in the treatment of cardiac arrest? A systematic review Sillberg VA, Perry JJ, Stiell IG (...) , Wells GA CRD summary The authors concluded that the combination of vasopressin and epinephrine found a trend towards better rate of spontaneous cardiac circulation, but equivocal effects on survival; there was inadequate evidence at the time of the review to advocate the sequential use of vasopressin and epinephrine for cardiac arrest. The authors' conclusions reflect the evidence presented and are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of vasopressin and epinephrine

DARE.2008

264. Goal-directed hemodynamic optimization in the post-cardiac arrest syndrome: a systematic review

Goal-directed hemodynamic optimization in the post-cardiac arrest syndrome: a systematic review Goal-directed hemodynamic optimization in the post-cardiac arrest syndrome: a systematic review Goal-directed hemodynamic optimization in the post-cardiac arrest syndrome: a systematic review Jones AE, Shapiro NI, Kilgannon JH, Trzeciak S, Emergency Medicine Shock Research Network (EMSHOCKNET) investigators CRD summary This review found that there were no clinical trials available that evaluated (...) haemodynamic optimisation in post-cardiac arrest patients. The authors' conclusions reflect the absence of evidence in relation to the review question. Authors' objectives To evaluate the evidence for goal-directed haemodynamic support in post-cardiac arrest syndrome and determine the effect of this treatment on survival. Searching MEDLINE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were each searched from inception to July 2007 for relevant studies; search terms were reported. Websites that contained details

DARE.2008

265. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation alone vs. cardiopulmonary resuscitation plus automated external defibrillator use by non-healthcare professionals: a meta-analysis on 1583 cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation alone vs. cardiopulmonary resuscitation plus automated external defibrillator use by non-healthcare professionals: a meta-analysis on 1583 cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation alone vs cardiopulmonary resuscitation plus automated external defibrillator use by non-healthcare professionals: a meta-analysis on 1583 cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Cardiopulmonary resuscitation alone vs cardiopulmonary resuscitation plus (...) automated external defibrillator use by non-healthcare professionals: a meta-analysis on 1583 cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Sanna T, La Torre G, de Waure C, Scapigliati A, Ricciardi W, Dello Russo A, Pelargonio G, Casella M, Bellocci F CRD summary The authors concluded that the use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) plus automated external defibrillators (AED) by trained non-healthcare professionals offered a survival advantage compared to only CPR in participants with out-of-hospital

DARE.2008

267. An automated external defibrillator in the home did not reduce all-cause mortality in patients at risk of cardiac arrest

An automated external defibrillator in the home did not reduce all-cause mortality in patients at risk of cardiac arrest An automated external defibrillator in the home did not reduce all-cause mortality in patients at risk of cardiac arrest | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username (...) * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here An automated external defibrillator in the home did not reduce all-cause mortality in patients at risk of cardiac arrest Article Text Treatment An automated external defibrillator in the home did not reduce all-cause

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2008

268. Risk Factors for Aborted Cardiac Arrest and Sudden Cardiac Death in Children With the Congenital Long-QT Syndrome

Risk Factors for Aborted Cardiac Arrest and Sudden Cardiac Death in Children With the Congenital Long-QT Syndrome 18427136 2008 04 29 2008 05 22 2016 10 19 1524-4539 117 17 2008 Apr 29 Circulation Circulation Risk factors for aborted cardiac arrest and sudden cardiac death in children with the congenital long-QT syndrome. 2184-91 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.107.701243 The congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) is an important cause of sudden cardiac death in children without structural heart disease (...) . However, specific risk factors for life-threatening cardiac events in children with this genetic disorder have not been identified. Cox proportional-hazards regression modeling was used to identify risk factors for aborted cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death in 3015 LQTS children from the International LQTS Registry who were followed up from 1 through 12 years of age. The cumulative probability of the combined end point was significantly higher in boys (5%) than in girls (1%; P<0.001). Risk factors

EvidenceUpdates2008 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

269. Home use of automated external defibrillators for sudden cardiac arrest.

Home use of automated external defibrillators for sudden cardiac arrest. 18381485 2008 04 24 2008 04 30 2016 10 19 1533-4406 358 17 2008 Apr 24 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Home use of automated external defibrillators for sudden cardiac arrest. 1793-804 10.1056/NEJMoa0801651 The most common location of out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest is the home, a situation in which emergency medical services are challenged to provide timely care. Consequently, home use (...) of an automated external defibrillator (AED) might offer an opportunity to improve survival for patients at risk. We randomly assigned 7001 patients with previous anterior-wall myocardial infarction who were not candidates for an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator to receive one of two responses to sudden cardiac arrest occurring at home: either the control response (calling emergency medical services and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR]) or the use of an AED, followed by calling emergency

NEJM2008

270. Thrombolysis during resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

Thrombolysis during resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. 19092151 2008 12 18 2009 01 07 2016 11 24 1533-4406 359 25 2008 Dec 18 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Thrombolysis during resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. 2651-62 10.1056/NEJMoa070570 Approximately 70% of persons who have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have underlying acute myocardial infarction or pulmonary embolism. Therefore, thrombolysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation may (...) improve survival. In a double-blind, multicenter trial, we randomly assigned adult patients with witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to receive tenecteplase or placebo during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Adjunctive heparin or aspirin was not used. The primary end point was 30-day survival; the secondary end points were hospital admission, return of spontaneous circulation, 24-hour survival, survival to hospital discharge, and neurologic outcome. After blinded review of data from the first 443

NEJM2008

271. Six year audit of cardiac arrests and medical emergency team calls in an Australian outer metropolitan teaching hospital.

Six year audit of cardiac arrests and medical emergency team calls in an Australian outer metropolitan teaching hospital. PROBLEM: In-hospital cardiac arrest often represents failure of optimal clinical care. The use of medical emergency teams to prevent such events is controversial. In-hospital cardiac arrests have been reduced in several single centre historical control studies, but the only randomised prospective study showed no such benefit. In our hospital an important problem was failure (...) to call the medical emergency team or cardiac arrest team when, before in-hospital cardiac arrest, patients had fulfilled the criteria for calling the team. DESIGN: Single centre, prospective audit of cardiac arrests and data on use of the medical emergency team during 2000 to 2005. SETTING: 400 bed general outer suburban metropolitan teaching hospital. STRATEGIES FOR CHANGE: Three initiatives in the hospital to improve use of the medical emergency team: orientation programme for first year doctors

BMJ2007 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

272. Inter-Association Task Force recommendations on emergency preparedness and management of sudden cardiac arrest in high school and college athletic programs: a consensus statement.

Inter-Association Task Force recommendations on emergency preparedness and management of sudden cardiac arrest in high school and college athletic programs: a consensus statement. Inter-Association Task Force recommendations on emergency preparedness and management of sudden cardiac arrest in high school and college athletic programs: a consensus statement. | National Guideline Clearinghouse Search Sign In Username or Email * Password * Remember Me Don't have an account? Guideline Summary NGC

National Athletic Trainers' Association2007

273. Aminophylline in bradyasystolic cardiac arrest

Aminophylline in bradyasystolic cardiac arrest BestBets: Aminophylline in bradyasystolic cardiac arrest Aminophylline in bradyasystolic cardiac arrest Report By: Elizabeth Hayward 1, Laurie Showler 2, Jasmeet Soar 1 - F2 Trainee, SHO Palliative Care, Consultant Anaesthetics & ICU respectively Search checked by Laurie Showler - SHO Palliative Care Institution: Southmead Hospital, North Bristol NHS Trust 1, Dr Kershaw's Hospice, Royal Oldham Hospital 2 Date Submitted: 19th June 2007 Date (...) Completed: 27th July 2007 Last Modified: 19th June 2007 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [adults with bradyasystolic cardiac arrest] does [the use of aminophylline as second line agent] increase [restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and improve long terms survival]? Clinical Scenario A 59 year old man has a witnessed out of hospital cardiac arrest and immediate bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). When the paramedic ambulance crew arrive after 8 minutes the first

BestBETS2007

274. Higher Survival Rates Among Younger Patients After Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Cardiac Arrests.

Higher Survival Rates Among Younger Patients After Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Cardiac Arrests. PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club2007

275. Assessing automated external defibrillators in preventing deaths from sudden cardiac arrest: an economic evaluation

Assessing automated external defibrillators in preventing deaths from sudden cardiac arrest: an economic evaluation Assessing automated external defibrillators in preventing deaths from sudden cardiac arrest: an economic evaluation Assessing automated external defibrillators in preventing deaths from sudden cardiac arrest: an economic evaluation Sharieff W, Kaulback K Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each (...) and deliver shocks if needed. Type of intervention Other: Emergency care. Economic study type Cost-utility analysis. Study population The study population comprised a hypothetical cohort of new cardiac arrest patients in Ontario with a mean age of 69 (+/- 13) years. Setting The settings were hospitals, office buildings, apartment buildings and homes where two or more persons were trained in cardiopulmonary respiration. The economic analysis was carried out in Canada. Dates to which data relate

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2007

278. Risk of aborted cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death during adolescence in the long-QT syndrome.

Risk of aborted cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death during adolescence in the long-QT syndrome. CONTEXT: Analysis of predictors of cardiac events in hereditary long-QT syndrome (LQTS) has primarily considered syncope as the predominant end point. Risk factors specific for aborted cardiac arrest and sudden cardiac death have not been investigated. OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors associated with aborted cardiac arrest and sudden cardiac death during adolescence in patients with clinically (...) suspected LQTS. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The study involved 2772 participants from the International Long QT Syndrome Registry who were alive at age 10 years and were followed up during adolescence until age 20 years. The registry enrollment began in 1979 at 5 cardiology centers in the United States and Europe. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Aborted cardiac arrest or LQTS-related sudden cardiac death; follow-up ended on February 15, 2005. RESULTS: There were 81 patients who experienced aborted

JAMA2006

279. Validation of a rule for termination of resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

Validation of a rule for termination of resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. BACKGROUND: We prospectively evaluated a clinical prediction rule to be used by emergency medical technicians (EMTs) trained in the use of an automated external defibrillator for the termination of basic life support resuscitative efforts during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The rule recommends termination when there is no return of spontaneous circulation, no shocks are administered, and the arrest (...) is not witnessed by emergency medical-services personnel. Otherwise, the rule recommends transportation to the hospital, in accordance with routine practice. METHODS: The study included 24 emergency medical systems in Ontario, Canada. All patients 18 years of age or older who had an arrest of presumed cardiac cause and who were treated by EMTs trained in the use of an automated external defibrillator were included. The patients were treated according to standard guidelines. Characteristics of diagnostic tests

NEJM2006

280. Victims of cardiac arrest occurring outside the hospital: a source of transplantable kidneys.

Victims of cardiac arrest occurring outside the hospital: a source of transplantable kidneys. BACKGROUND: The use of non-heart-beating donors could help shorten the list of patients who are waiting for a kidney transplant. Several reports describe acceptable results of transplantations from non-heart-beating donors who had in-hospital cardiac arrest, but few reports describe results of transplantations from non-heart-beating donors who had cardiac arrest that occurred outside of the hospital (...) (Maastricht type I and type II donors). OBJECTIVE: To compare graft survival rates among patients receiving kidneys from heart-beating donors versus type I or type II non-heart-beating donors. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study of transplantations performed from January 1989 to December 2004. SETTING: Kidney transplant program of a teaching hospital in Madrid, Spain. PATIENTS: 320 patients who received a kidney transplant from non-heart-beating donors (273 type I donors and 47 type II donors) and 584

Annals of Internal Medicine2006