Latest & greatest articles for cannabis

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Top results for cannabis

161. Cannabinoids as co-analgesics: review of clinical effectiveness

Cannabinoids as co-analgesics: review of clinical effectiveness Cannabinoids as co-analgesics: review of clinical effectiveness Cannabinoids as co-analgesics: review of clinical effectiveness Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies (...) in Health. Cannabinoids as co-analgesics: review of clinical effectiveness. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). 2010 Authors' conclusions In conclusion, the four identified studies suggest that the use of cannabinoids as co-analgesia in patients with non-neuropathic pain is effective. The patient populations included in the studies varied and included patients with cancer pain, non-cancer pain, rheumatoid arthritis, and acute postherpetic neuralgia. The studies also

2010 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

162. Cannabinoids for the management of neuropathic pain: review of clinical effectiveness

Cannabinoids for the management of neuropathic pain: review of clinical effectiveness Cannabinoids for the management of neuropathic pain: review of clinical effectiveness Cannabinoids for the management of neuropathic pain: review of clinical effectiveness Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA (...) database. Citation Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health. Cannabinoids for the management of neuropathic pain: review of clinical effectiveness. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). 2010 Authors' conclusions In two five-week RCTs, THC:CBD was more effective than placebo when added to existing therapy for the management of neuropathic pain associated with MS and in patients with neuropathic pain stemming from mixed etiologies. In a longer study (12 weeks

2010 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

163. Adverse health effects of non-medical cannabis use. (Abstract)

Adverse health effects of non-medical cannabis use. For over two decades, cannabis, commonly known as marijuana, has been the most widely used illicit drug by young people in high-income countries, and has recently become popular on a global scale. Epidemiological research during the past 10 years suggests that regular use of cannabis during adolescence and into adulthood can have adverse effects. Epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory studies have established an association between cannabis (...) use and adverse outcomes. We focus on adverse health effects of greatest potential public health interest-that is, those that are most likely to occur and to affect a large number of cannabis users. The most probable adverse effects include a dependence syndrome, increased risk of motor vehicle crashes, impaired respiratory function, cardiovascular disease, and adverse effects of regular use on adolescent psychosocial development and mental health.

2009 Lancet

164. Cannabinoids for the treatment of dementia. (Abstract)

Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and LILACS were searched on 11 April 2008 using the terms: cannabis or cannabinoid* or endocannabinoid* or cannabidiol or THC or CBD or dronabinol or delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol or marijuana or marihuana or hashish. The CDCIG Specialized Register contains records from all major health care databases (The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS) as well as from many clinical trials registries and grey literature sources.All double-blind (...) Cannabinoids for the treatment of dementia. Following the discovery of an endogenous cannabinoid system and the identification of specific cannabinoid receptors in the central nervous system, much work has been done to investigate the main effects of these compounds. There is increasing evidence that the cannabinoid system may regulate neurodegenerative processes such as excessive glutamate production, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. Neurodegeneration is a feature common to the various

2009 Cochrane

165. No evidence of benefit from cannabinoids in dementia

No evidence of benefit from cannabinoids in dementia PEARLS Practical Evidence About Real Life Situations PEARLS are succinct summaries of Cochrane Systematic Reviews for primary care practitioners. They No evidence of benefit from cannabinoids in dementia Clinical question Are cannabinoids clinically effective in the treatment of dementia? Bottom line There was no evidence that cannabinoids are effective in the improvement of disturbed behaviour in dementia or in the treatment of other (...) symptoms of dementia. Only 1 small study was included which was designed to focus on the effects of the cannabinoid dronabinol on anorexia in Alzheimer's disease. While improvement of anorexia is clearly an important outcome for patients and their carers, it was not a primary outcome of interest in this review. The study concluded that the cannabinoid dronabinol may be useful in the treatment of anorexia and to improve disturbed behaviour in people with Alzheimer's disease. Caveat Only 1 small study

2009 Cochrane PEARLS

166. Systematic review and meta-analysis of cannabis treatment for chronic pain

Systematic review and meta-analysis of cannabis treatment for chronic pain Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.

167. Whole plant cannabis extracts in the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis: a systematic review

Whole plant cannabis extracts in the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.

168. Cannabinoids for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder: a review of the clinical effectiveness and guidelines

Cannabinoids for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder: a review of the clinical effectiveness and guidelines Cannabinoids for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder: a review of the clinical effectiveness and guidelines Cannabinoids for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder: a review of the clinical effectiveness and guidelines Mujoomdar M, Spry C, Banks R Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member (...) of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Mujoomdar M, Spry C, Banks R. Cannabinoids for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder: a review of the clinical effectiveness and guidelines. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). 2009 Authors' conclusions Overall, the evidence regarding the clinical effectiveness of cannabinoids for the treatment of PTSD is limited. The one included study concluded

2009 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

169. Familial predisposition for psychiatric disorder: comparison of subjects treated for cannabis-induced psychosis and schizophrenia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Familial predisposition for psychiatric disorder: comparison of subjects treated for cannabis-induced psychosis and schizophrenia Cannabis-induced psychosis is considered a distinct clinical entity in the existing psychiatric diagnostic systems. However, the validity of the diagnosis is uncertain.To establish rate ratios of developing cannabis-induced psychosis associated with predisposition to psychosis and other psychiatric disorders in a first-degree relative and to compare them (...) with the corresponding rate ratios for developing schizophrenia spectrum disorders.A population-based cohort was retrieved from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register and linked with the Danish Civil Registration System. History of treatment of psychiatric disorder in family members was used as an indicator of predisposition to psychiatric disorder. Rate ratios of cannabis-induced psychosis and schizophrenia associated with predisposition to psychiatric disorders were compared using competing risk

2008 EvidenceUpdates

170. Cannabis and schizophrenia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cannabis and schizophrenia. Many people with schizophrenia use cannabis and its effects on the illness are unclear.To evaluate the effects of cannabis use on people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like illnesses.We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO.We included all randomised trials involving cannabinoids and people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like (...) , there is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of cannabis/cannabinoid compounds for people suffering with schizophrenia. This review highlights the need for well designed, conducted and reported clinical trials to address the potential effects of cannabis based compounds for people with schizophrenia.

2008 Cochrane

171. Cannabinoid receptor 1 blocker rimonabant (SR 141716) for treatment of alcohol dependence: results from a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial (Abstract)

Cannabinoid receptor 1 blocker rimonabant (SR 141716) for treatment of alcohol dependence: results from a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the endocannabinoid system is implicated in the development of alcohol dependence. In addition, in animal models, the cannabinoid receptor 1 blocker rimonabant was found to decrease alcohol consumption, possibly by indirect modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. This was a 12-week double-blind, placebo (...) -controlled, proof-of-concept study to assess the possible efficacy of the cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist rimonabant 20 mg/d (2 x 10 mg) in the prevention of relapse to alcohol in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients. A total of 260 patients were included, 258 were exposed to medication, and 208 (80.6%) were men. Patients had an alcohol history of 15 years on average. More patients in the rimonabant group (94/131 [71.8%]) completed treatment compared with the placebo group (79/127 [62.2

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

172. Cannabis use increases risk of developing symptoms of mania

Cannabis use increases risk of developing symptoms of mania Cannabis use increases risk of developing symptoms of mania | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name (...) or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Cannabis use increases risk of developing symptoms of mania Article Text Aetiology Cannabis use increases risk of developing symptoms of mania Statistics from Altmetric.com Request Permissions If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which

2008 Evidence-Based Mental Health

173. Cannabis smoking and periodontal disease among young adults. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cannabis smoking and periodontal disease among young adults. Tobacco smoking is a recognized behavioral risk factor for periodontal disease (through its systemic effects), and cannabis smoking may contribute in a similar way.To determine whether cannabis smoking is a risk factor for periodontal disease.Prospective cohort study of the general population, with cannabis use determined at ages 18, 21, 26, and 32 years and dental examinations conducted at ages 26 and 32 years. The most recent data (...) sites per tooth.Three cannabis exposure groups were determined: no exposure (293 individuals, or 32.3%), some exposure (428; 47.4%), and high exposure (182; 20.2%). At age 32 years, 265 participants (29.3%) had 1 or more sites with 4 mm or greater CAL, and 111 participants (12.3%) had 1 or more sites with 5 mm or greater CAL. Incident attachment loss between the ages of 26 and 32 years in the none, some, and high cannabis exposure groups was 6.5%, 11.2%, and 23.6%, respectively. After controlling

2008 JAMA

174. Wheat grass supplementation decreases oxidative stress in healthy subjects: a comparative study with spirulina. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Wheat grass supplementation decreases oxidative stress in healthy subjects: a comparative study with spirulina. 17983333 2008 01 31 2007 11 06 1075-5535 13 8 2007 Oct Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) J Altern Complement Med Wheat grass supplementation decreases oxidative stress in healthy subjects: a comparative study with spirulina. 789-91 Shyam Radhey R Singh Som N SN Vats Praveen P Singh Vijay K VK Bajaj Rajeev R Singh Shashi B SB Banerjee Pratul K PK eng

2008 Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Controlled trial quality: uncertain

175. Cannabinoid type 1 receptor antagonists assist smoking cessation

Cannabinoid type 1 receptor antagonists assist smoking cessation PEARLS Practical Evidence About Real Life Situations PEARLS are succinct summaries of Cochrane Systematic Reviews for primary care practitioners. They are funded by the New Zealand Guidelines Group. PEARLS provide guidance on whether a treatment is effective or ineffective. PEARLS are prepared as an educational resource and do not replace clinician judgement in the management of individual cases. View PEARLS online (...) at: www.cochraneprimarycare.org Cannabinoid type 1 receptor antagonists assist smoking cessation Clinical question Are selective type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptor antagonists effective in assisting smoking cessation? Bottom line From the preliminary trial reports available, selective CB1 receptor antagonists (rimonabant 20 mg) may increase the odds of not smoking at one year approximately 1.5 fold. The evidence for their effectiveness in maintaining abstinence is inconclusive. Higher doses (20 mg versus 5 mg) may moderate

2008 Cochrane PEARLS

176. Review: use of cannabis is associated with increased risk of psychotic outcomes later in life

Review: use of cannabis is associated with increased risk of psychotic outcomes later in life Review: use of cannabis is associated with increased risk of psychotic outcomes later in lifeCommentary | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: use of cannabis is associated with increased risk of psychotic outcomes later in lifeCommentary Article Text Causation Review: use of cannabis is associated with increased risk of psychotic

2008 Evidence-Based Nursing

177. Review: Cannabis use increases the risk of psychotic outcomes

Review: Cannabis use increases the risk of psychotic outcomes Review: Cannabis use increases the risk of psychotic outcomes | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user (...) name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: Cannabis use increases the risk of psychotic outcomes Article Text Aetiology Review: Cannabis use increases the risk of psychotic outcomes Statistics from Altmetric.com Request Permissions If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link

2008 Evidence-Based Mental Health

178. Brief personalised motivational interviewing reduces frequency of marijuana use in regular users ambivalent to change

Brief personalised motivational interviewing reduces frequency of marijuana use in regular users ambivalent to change Brief personalised motivational interviewing reduces frequency of marijuana use in regular users ambivalent to change | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your (...) username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Brief personalised motivational interviewing reduces frequency of marijuana use in regular users ambivalent to change Article Text Therapeutics Brief

2008 Evidence-Based Mental Health

179. Short scales to assess cannabis-related problems: a review of psychometric properties Full Text available with Trip Pro

screened for additional studies. Study selection Studies that evaluated the psychometric properties concerning the reliability or validity of one of the following four scales were eligible for inclusion: Cannabis Abuse Screening Test (CAST); Severity of Dependence Scale (SDS); Cannabis Use Disorders Identification Test (CUDIT); and Problematic Use of Marijuana (PUM). Studies that used these questionnaires to assess the validity of another instrument were excluded. Included studies assessed adults (...) Short scales to assess cannabis-related problems: a review of psychometric properties Short scales to assess cannabis-related problems: a review of psychometric properties Short scales to assess cannabis-related problems: a review of psychometric properties Piontek D, Kraus L, Klempova D CRD summary This review concluded that all four screening tools to assess cannabis-related problems showed satisfactory measures of reliability and validity. Limitations in the review, in particular

2008 DARE.

180. Therapeutic use of Cannabis sativa on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting among cancer patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

Therapeutic use of Cannabis sativa on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting among cancer patients: systematic review and meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 DARE.