Latest & greatest articles for cannabis

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Top results for cannabis

101. Use of Cannabis for Medicinal Purposes

Use of Cannabis for Medicinal Purposes POSITION PAPER ROYAL AUSTRALASIAN COLLEGE OF SURGEONS Subject: Use of Cannabis for Medicinal Purposes Ref. No. REL-GOV-034 Division: Relationships & Advocacy Document Owner: Director, Relationships & Advocacy Authorised By: Governance & Advocacy Committee Page 1 of 3 Original Issue: Version: Approval Date: Review Date: June 2015 1 June 2015 June 2018 INTRODUCTION Cannabis is the most commonly used illegal substance in Australia i and New Zealand ii (...) , with a wide body of research to suggest the harmful risks it poses, particularly to those from younger age groups, those with or at risk of psychotic illness, and those who use it on a regular basis iii . ‘Medical cannabis’ applies when cannabis is used for therapeutic and pain relief purposes. The primary medical use of cannabis is relief of symptoms rather than cure of underlying disease. iv Little data is available to distinguish the percentage of cannabis use for medical purposes compared

2015 ASERNIP-S

102. Universal Internet-based prevention for alcohol and cannabis use reduces truancy, psychological distress and moral disengagement: A cluster randomised controlled trial (PubMed)

Universal Internet-based prevention for alcohol and cannabis use reduces truancy, psychological distress and moral disengagement: A cluster randomised controlled trial A universal Internet-based preventive intervention has been shown to reduce alcohol and cannabis use. The aim of this study was to examine if this program could also reduce risk-factors associated with substance use in adolescents.A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in Sydney, Australia in 2007-2008 to assess (...) the effectiveness of the Internet-based Climate Schools: Alcohol and Cannabis course. The evidence-based course, aimed at reducing alcohol and cannabis use, consists of two sets of six lessons delivered approximately six months apart. A total of 764 students (mean 13.1years) from 10 secondary schools were randomly allocated to receive the preventive intervention (n=397, five schools), or their usual health classes (n=367, five schools) over the year. Participants were assessed at baseline, immediately post

2014 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

103. Pharmacotherapies for cannabis dependence. (PubMed)

Pharmacotherapies for cannabis dependence. Cannabis is the most prevalent illicit drug in the world. Demand for treatment of cannabis use disorders is increasing. There are currently no pharmacotherapies approved for treatment of cannabis use disorders.To assess the effectiveness and safety of pharmacotherapies as compared with each other, placebo or supportive care for reducing symptoms of cannabis withdrawal and promoting cessation or reduction of cannabis use.We searched the Cochrane Central (...) Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (to 4 March 2014), MEDLINE (to week 3 February 2014), EMBASE (to 3 March 2014) and PsycINFO (to week 4 February 2014). We also searched reference lists of articles, electronic sources of ongoing trials and conference proceedings, and contacted selected researchers active in the area.Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials involving the use of medications to reduce the symptoms and signs of cannabis withdrawal or to promote cessation or reduction

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2014 Cochrane

104. The medical use of cannabis for reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV/AIDS. (PubMed)

The medical use of cannabis for reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV/AIDS. The use of cannabis (marijuana) or of its psychoactive ingredient delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as a medicine has been highly contested in many settings.There have been claims that smoked or ingested cannabis, either in its natural form or artificial form (pharmaceutically manufactured drug such as dronabinol), improves the appetites of people with AIDS, results in weight gain and lifts mood, thus (...) improving the quality of life.The objectives of this review were to assess whether cannabis (in its natural or artificially produced form), either smoked or ingested, decreases the morbidity or mortality of patients infected with HIV.The search strategy was conducted to July 2012 and was based on that of the Cochrane HIV/AIDS Review Group. We searched the following databases: CENTRAL/CCTR, MEDLINE and EMBASE. In addition, searching was performed where necessary of journals, reference lists of articles

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2013 Cochrane

105. Drugs for multiple sclerosis - Drug Facts box for Cannabis extract (Sativex)

Drugs for multiple sclerosis - Drug Facts box for Cannabis extract (Sativex) Version History Policy Title Drugs for MS.Drug fact box – cannabis extract (Sativex) Version 1.0 Author West Midlands Commissioning Support Unit Publication Date Jan 2013 Review Date Supersedes/New (Further fields as required by local organisations) Previous Versions Version Date Changes Drugs for multiple sclerosis Summaries of key information and evidence for efficacy and safety January 2013 Drug Facts box (...) for Cannabis extract (Sativex) What is this drug for? 1 Improvement of the symptoms of spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis Who is this drug for? 1 People with moderate to severe spasticity due to multiple sclerosis who have not responded adequately to other anti-spasticity medication, and who demonstrate clinically significant improvement in spasticity-related symptoms during an initial trial of Sativex therapy. Who should not be taking this drug? 1 Patients under age 18. Patients with severe

2013 West Midlands Clinical Support Unit

106. Vulnerability for psychosis at ages 13 and 16 predicts cannabis use at ages 16 and 19, and cannabis use at age 16 predicts psychosis vulnerability at age 19

Vulnerability for psychosis at ages 13 and 16 predicts cannabis use at ages 16 and 19, and cannabis use at age 16 predicts psychosis vulnerability at age 19 Vulnerability for psychosis at ages 13 and 16 predicts cannabis use at ages 16 and 19, and cannabis use at age 16 predicts psychosis vulnerability at age 19 | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time (...) . To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Vulnerability for psychosis at ages 13 and 16 predicts cannabis use at ages 16

2013 Evidence-Based Mental Health

107. [Extract from Cannabis sativa L. - Benefit assessment according to § 35a Social Code Book V (dossier assessment)]

[Extract from Cannabis sativa L. - Benefit assessment according to § 35a Social Code Book V (dossier assessment)] Extrakt aus Cannabis Sativa – Nutzenbewertung gemäß § 35a SGB V [Extract from Cannabis sativa L. - Benefit assessment according to § 35a Social Code Book V (dossier assessment)] Extrakt aus Cannabis Sativa – Nutzenbewertung gemäß § 35a SGB V [Extract from Cannabis sativa L. - Benefit assessment according to § 35a Social Code Book V (dossier assessment)] IQWiG Record Status (...) This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation IQWiG. Extrakt aus Cannabis Sativa – Nutzenbewertung gemäß § 35a SGB V. [Extract from Cannabis sativa L. - Benefit assessment according to § 35a Social Code Book V (dossier assessment)] Cologne: Institut fuer Qualitaet und Wirtschaftlichkeit im Gesundheitswesen (IQWiG). IQWiG Berichte 124. 2012 Final publication URL Indexing

2012 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

108. Acute cannabis consumption and motor vehicle collision risk: systematic review of observational studies and meta-analysis. (PubMed)

Acute cannabis consumption and motor vehicle collision risk: systematic review of observational studies and meta-analysis. To determine whether the acute consumption of cannabis (cannabinoids) by drivers increases the risk of a motor vehicle collision.Systematic review of observational studies, with meta-analysis.We did electronic searches in 19 databases, unrestricted by year or language of publication. We also did manual searches of reference lists, conducted a search for unpublished studies (...) , and reviewed the personal libraries of the research team. Review methods We included observational epidemiology studies of motor vehicle collisions with an appropriate control group, and selected studies that measured recent cannabis use in drivers by toxicological analysis of whole blood or self report. We excluded experimental or simulator studies. Two independent reviewers assessed risk of bias in each selected study, with consensus, using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Risk estimates were combined using

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2012 BMJ

109. Extract from Cannabis sativa - Benefit assessment according to § 35a Social Code Book V

Extract from Cannabis sativa - Benefit assessment according to § 35a Social Code Book V Extract 1 Translation of Sections 2.1 to 2.6 of the dossier assessment (“Extrakt aus Cannabis Sativa – Nutzenbewertung gemäß § 35a SGB V” (Version 1.0; Status: 29.03.2012). Please note: This translation is provided as a service by IQWiG to English-language readers. However, solely the German original text is absolutely authoritative and legally binding. Extract from Cannabis sativa – Benefit assessment (...) according to § 35a Social Code Book V 1 Extract of dossier assessment A12-01 Version 1.0 Extract from Cannabis sativa – Benefit assessment acc. to § 35a SGB V 29.03.2012 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) - i - Publishing details Publisher: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care Topic: Extract from Cannabis sativa – Benefit assessment according to § 35a Social Code Book V Contracting agency: Federal Joint Committee Commission awarded on: 02.01.2012 Internal

2012 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare (IQWiG)

110. Delusional-like experiences are more common in those with cannabis dependence disorder, very early-onset alcohol use or dependence disorders, and daily smokers

Delusional-like experiences are more common in those with cannabis dependence disorder, very early-onset alcohol use or dependence disorders, and daily smokers Delusional-like experiences are more common in those with cannabis dependence disorder, very early-onset alcohol use or dependence disorders, and daily smokers | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any (...) time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Delusional-like experiences are more common in those with cannabis

2012 Evidence-Based Mental Health

111. What is the Accuracy of Screening Instruments for Alcohol and Cannabis Misuse Disorders Among Adolescents and Young Adults in the Emergency Department?

What is the Accuracy of Screening Instruments for Alcohol and Cannabis Misuse Disorders Among Adolescents and Young Adults in the Emergency Department? Systematic Review Snapshot TAKE-HOME MESSAGE The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) 2-item screen for alcohol misuse and 1-item Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children question for cannabis abuse are simple tools that could be adopted for emergency department (ED) use; however, their performance (...) and studies in progress. STUDY SELECTION Studies were included if the in- strument focused on detecting alcohol and other drug misuse in patients aged 21 years or younger in the ED and if the authors at- tempted to establish the reliabil- ity, validity, and accuracy of these instruments. Each study was screened by at least 2 of 4 re- viewers; the speci?c method for dealing with discrepancies was not described. What Is the Accuracy of Screening Instruments for Alcohol and Cannabis Misuse Disorders Among

2012 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

112. Continued cannabis use and risk of incidence and persistence of psychotic symptoms: 10 year follow-up cohort study. (PubMed)

Continued cannabis use and risk of incidence and persistence of psychotic symptoms: 10 year follow-up cohort study. To determine whether use of cannabis in adolescence increases the risk for psychotic outcomes by affecting the incidence and persistence of subclinical expression of psychosis in the general population (that is, expression of psychosis below the level required for a clinical diagnosis).Analysis of data from a prospective population based cohort study in Germany (early (...) developmental stages of psychopathology study).Population based cohort study in Germany.1923 individuals from the general population, aged 14-24 at baseline.Incidence and persistence of subthreshold psychotic symptoms after use of cannabis in adolescence. Cannabis use and psychotic symptoms were assessed at three time points (baseline, T2 (3.5 years), T3 (8.4 years)) over a 10 year follow-up period with the Munich version of the composite international diagnostic interview (M-CIDI).In individuals who had

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2011 BMJ

113. Incident cannabis use in adolescents and young adults is associated with an increased risk of developing psychotic symptoms

Incident cannabis use in adolescents and young adults is associated with an increased risk of developing psychotic symptoms Incident cannabis use in adolescents and young adults is associated with an increased risk of developing psychotic symptoms | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log (...) in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Incident cannabis use in adolescents and young adults is associated with an increased risk of developing psychotic symptoms Article Text

2011 Evidence-Based Mental Health

114. Cannabis and suicide: longitudinal study (PubMed)

Cannabis and suicide: longitudinal study Some studies suggest that cannabis use is associated with suicidal ideation, but no detailed longitudinal study has examined suicide as an outcome.To examine the association between cannabis use and completed suicide.A longitudinal study investigated 50 087 men conscripted for Swedish military service, with cannabis use measured non-anonymously at conscription. Suicides during 33 years of follow-up were identified by linkage with the National Cause (...) of Death Register.There were 600 (1.2% of cohort) suicides or deaths from undetermined causes. Cannabis use was associated with an increased risk of suicide (crude OR for 'ever use' 1.62, 95% CI 1.28-2.07), but this association was eliminated after adjustment for confounding (adjusted OR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.65-1.20).Although there was a strong association between cannabis use and suicide, this was explained by markers of psychological and behavioural problems. These results suggest that cannabis use

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2010 EvidenceUpdates

115. Estimates of how many cannabis users need to be prevented in order to prevent one case of schizophrenia

Estimates of how many cannabis users need to be prevented in order to prevent one case of schizophrenia Estimates of how many cannabis users need to be prevented in order to prevent one case of schizophrenia | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Estimates of how many cannabis users need to be prevented in order to prevent one case of schizophrenia Article Text Aetiology Estimates of how many cannabis users need

2010 Evidence-Based Mental Health

116. Cannabis and mental health management in primary care

Cannabis and mental health management in primary care 554 Reprinted from Aust RAli An F Amily Physici An Vol. 39, n o. 8, August 2010 Background Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug in Australia. Regular use has been associated with increased risk for a range of harms, including the development and exacerbation of mental disorders. Objective This article reviews current evidence relating to the neuropharmacology of cannabis and its impact on mental health, as well as strategies related (...) to the assessment and management of cannabis and co-occurring mental disorders within the primary care setting. Discussion Early and heavy use of cannabis has been associated with the onset of psychosis and depression, while chronic use results in poorer treatment outcomes among those with co-occurring mental disorders. Effective management involves the development of therapeutic engagement and an ongoing relationship, with monitoring of cannabis use and mental health problems. Standard pharmacotherapeutic

2010 The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

117. Review: pharmacological and psychological interventions decrease cannabis use in people with depressive and psychotic disorders in the short term

Review: pharmacological and psychological interventions decrease cannabis use in people with depressive and psychotic disorders in the short term Review: pharmacological and psychological interventions decrease cannabis use in people with depressive and psychotic disorders in the short term | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about (...) how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: pharmacological and psychological interventions decrease cannabis use in people

2010 Evidence-Based Mental Health

118. Review: short-term medical use of cannabis increases risk of non-serious adverse effects

Review: short-term medical use of cannabis increases risk of non-serious adverse effects Review: short-term medical use of cannabis increases risk of non-serious adverse effectsCommentary | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers (...) of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: short-term medical use of cannabis increases risk of non-serious adverse effectsCommentary Article Text Treatment Review: short-term medical use of cannabis increases risk of non-serious adverse effects

2010 Evidence-Based Nursing

119. A meta-analytic review of school-based prevention for cannabis use

A meta-analytic review of school-based prevention for cannabis use Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2010 DARE.

120. Adverse health effects of non-medical cannabis use. (PubMed)

Adverse health effects of non-medical cannabis use. For over two decades, cannabis, commonly known as marijuana, has been the most widely used illicit drug by young people in high-income countries, and has recently become popular on a global scale. Epidemiological research during the past 10 years suggests that regular use of cannabis during adolescence and into adulthood can have adverse effects. Epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory studies have established an association between cannabis (...) use and adverse outcomes. We focus on adverse health effects of greatest potential public health interest-that is, those that are most likely to occur and to affect a large number of cannabis users. The most probable adverse effects include a dependence syndrome, increased risk of motor vehicle crashes, impaired respiratory function, cardiovascular disease, and adverse effects of regular use on adolescent psychosocial development and mental health.

2009 Lancet