Latest & greatest articles for cannabis

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Top results for cannabis

86. Marijuana Use During Pregnancy and Lactation

UPDATE: This Committee Opinion is updated as highlighted to reflect a limited, focused change in the language and supporting evidence regarding marijuana use and neonatal outcomes. Marijuana Use During Pregnancy and Lactation ABSTRACT: Cannabis sativa (marijuana) is the illicit drug most commonly used during pregnancy. The self-reported prevalence of marijuana use during pregnancy ranges from 2% to 5% in most studies. A growing number of states are legalizing marijuana for medicinal or recreational (...) of marijuana for medicinal purposes in favor of an alternative therapy for which there are better pregnancy-specific safety data. There are insufficient data to evaluate the effects of marijuana use on infants during lactation and breastfeeding, and in the absence of such data, marijuana use is discouraged. Introduction Cannabis sativa (marijuana) is the illicit drug most commonly used during pregnancy. The self-reported prevalence of marijuana use during pregnancy ranges from 2% to 5% in most studies

2017 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

87. Missing "High" Quality Evidence: Medical Cannabinoids for Pain?

-marijuana-new- regulations-new-college-guidance-for-canadian-doctors. Last Accessed: April 1, 2017. 20. Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. Medicinal use of cannabis products. RACGP Position Statement. October 2016. Available at: http://www.racgp.org.au/download/Documents/Policies/Clinical/RACGP-position-on- medical-cannabis.pdf. Last Accessed: July 8, 2017. 21. Abramovici H. Information for Health Care Professionals: Cannabis (marihuana, marijuana) and the cannabinoids. 2013. Available (...) at: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp- mps/alt_formats/pdf/marihuana/med/infoprof-eng.pdf. Last Accessed: April 1, 2017. 22. Health Canada. Consumer Information—Cannabis (Marihuana, marijuana). 2016. Available at: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/alt_formats/pdf/marihuana/info/cons- eng.pdf. Last Accessed: April 1, 2017. Tools for Practice is a biweekly article summarizing medical evidence with a focus on topical issues and practice modifying information. It is coordinated by G. Michael Allan, MD, CCFP

2017 Tools for Practice

88. Harms of Medical Cannabinoids: Up in Smoke!

, paranoia 8 NNH=20. o Versus other agents like prochlorperazine, cannabinoids also increased adverse events: 7 Example sedation (NNH=7) and dizziness (NNH=3). • Adverse events rates varied little between different cannabinoid products (example nabiximol, nabilone, dronabinol, inhaled marijuana, etc.): 2 NNH=4-7. Context: • See Tools for Practice #199 and #201 for potential benefits. • Many studies enrolled patients with a history of medical or recreational cannabinoid use. 11,12 Regular users will: o (...) Harms of Medical Cannabinoids: Up in Smoke! Tools for Practice is proudly sponsored by the Alberta College of Family Physicians (ACFP). ACFP is a provincial, professional voluntary organization, representing more than 4,600 family physicians, family medicine residents, and medical students in Alberta. Established over sixty years ago, the ACFP strives for excellence in family practice through advocacy, continuing medical education and primary care research. www.acfp.ca November 27, 2017 Harms

2017 Tools for Practice

89. Any Other "Doobie"ous Effects of Medical Cannabinoids?

. 2. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The health effects of cannabis and cannabinoids: The current state of evidence and recommendations for research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625. 2017. Available at: https://www.nap.edu/catalog/24625/the-health-effects-of- cannabis-and-cannabinoids-the-current-state. Last Accessed: September 4, 2017. 3. Allan GM, Finley CR, Ton J, et al. Can Fam Physician, 2018, in press. 4. Cotter J. Oncol Nurs (...) Any Other "Doobie"ous Effects of Medical Cannabinoids? Tools for Practice is proudly sponsored by the Alberta College of Family Physicians (ACFP). ACFP is a provincial, professional voluntary organization, representing more than 4,600 family physicians, family medicine residents, and medical students in Alberta. Established over sixty years ago, the ACFP strives for excellence in family practice through advocacy, continuing medical education and primary care research. www.acfp.ca December 11

2017 Tools for Practice

90. "Zombie" Outbreak Caused by the Synthetic Cannabinoid AMB-FUBINACA in New York. Full Text available with Trip Pro

"Zombie" Outbreak Caused by the Synthetic Cannabinoid AMB-FUBINACA in New York. New psychoactive substances constitute a growing and dynamic class of abused drugs in the United States. On July 12, 2016, a synthetic cannabinoid caused mass intoxication of 33 persons in one New York City neighborhood, in an event described in the popular press as a "zombie" outbreak because of the appearance of the intoxicated persons.We obtained and tested serum, whole blood, and urine samples from 8 patients (...) among the 18 who were transported to local hospitals; we also tested a sample of the herbal "incense" product "AK-47 24 Karat Gold," which was implicated in the outbreak. Samples were analyzed by means of liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.The synthetic cannabinoid methyl 2-(1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamido)-3-methylbutanoate (AMB-FUBINACA, also known as MMB-FUBINACA or FUB-AMB) was identified in AK-47 24 Karat Gold at a mean (±SD) concentration of 16.0±3.9

2016 NEJM

91. Cannabinoids for refractory epilepsy treatment

Cannabinoids for refractory epilepsy treatment Cannabinoids for refractory epilepsy treatment Cannabinoids for refractory epilepsy treatment Soto N, Pichon-Riviere A, Augustovski F, García Martí S, Alcaraz A, Bardach A, Ciapponi A, López A, Rey-Ares L Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Soto N, Pichon-Riviere A, Augustovski F (...) , García Martí S, Alcaraz A, Bardach A, Ciapponi A, López A, Rey-Ares L. Cannabinoids for refractory epilepsy treatment. Buenos Aires: Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy (IECS). Informe de Respuesta Rapida No. 499. 2016 Authors' conclusions There is scarce and low quality evidence on cannabinoids (specifically cannabidiol) potential in reducing the frequency of seizures in patients with refractory epilepsy. The Clinical Practice Guidelines and health sponsors consulted do

2016 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

92. Unsuspected Malignancy During Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: The Snake in the Grass Full Text available with Trip Pro

Unsuspected Malignancy During Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: The Snake in the Grass Squamous cell carcinoma of the upper tract (SCC-UT) is a rare neoplasm that disproportionately affects patients with longstanding nephrolithiasis. Diagnosis is challenging and typically comes at late stages; as such, the prognosis is poor. The absence of a reliable diagnostic predictor for SCC highlights the need to keep the diagnosis in mind for at-risk patient populations. In this study, we describe a small

2016 Journal of endourology case reports

93. Opioids Out, Cannabis In Negotiating the Unknowns in Patient Care for Chronic Pain Full Text available with Trip Pro

0 Cannabinoids 0 Medical Marijuana AIM IM Analgesia trends Analgesics therapeutic use Analgesics, Opioid therapeutic use Cannabinoids therapeutic use Chronic Pain drug therapy Humans Legislation, Drug Medical Marijuana therapeutic use 2016 11 2 6 0 2016 12 15 6 0 2016 11 2 6 0 ppublish 27802551 2576617 10.1001/jama.2016.13677 PMC5332546 NIHMS850263 JAMA Intern Med. 2014 Oct;174(10):1673-4 25156148 BMC Med Educ. 2015 Mar 19;15:52 25888752 JAMA. 2015 Jun 23-30;313(24):2456-73 26103030 JAMA. 2016 (...) Opioids Out, Cannabis In Negotiating the Unknowns in Patient Care for Chronic Pain 27802551 2016 12 13 2018 11 13 1538-3598 316 17 2016 Nov 01 JAMA JAMA Opioids Out, Cannabis In: Negotiating the Unknowns in Patient Care for Chronic Pain. 1763-1764 10.1001/jama.2016.13677 Choo Esther K EK Center for Policy and Research in Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. Feldstein Ewing Sarah W SW Department of Psychiatry, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. Lovejoy

2016 JAMA

94. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Chronic Use and Cognitive Functioning and Mental Health ? An Update

, more robust longitudinal research is required to understand the nature of the relationships and ascertain whether they can be explained by other factors. Background After alcohol, cannabis, also referred to as marijuana, is the most widely used psychoactive substance in Canada. According to the 2013 Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS), 10.6% of Canadians aged 15 years and older reported using cannabis at least once in the past year (Statistics Canada, 2015), virtually Clearing (...) findings that validate and extend our current understanding of this issue. Other reports in this series address the effects of maternal cannabis use during pregnancy, cannabis use and driving, the respiratory effects of cannabis and the medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids. This series is intended for a broad audience, including health professionals, policy makers and researchers. 1 12 unchanged from 10.2% in 2012. The use of cannabis is generally more prevalent among young people, with 22.4

2016 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

95. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Medical Use of Cannabis and Cannabinoids ? An Update

not have the psychoactive effects of THC and appears to have a number of therapeutic benefits. The Endocannabinoid System The cannabinoids produce their effects by binding to cannabinoid receptors that are found throughout the human body. There are two types of cannabinoid receptors that are named CB 1 and CB 2 . The highest concentration of the CB 1 receptor is found in the brain, located on brain 3 • The cannabis plant produces marijuana (cannabis herb) and hashish (cannabis resin). • Cannabinoids (...) for a broad audience, including health professionals, policy makers and researchers. 1 5Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Medical Use of Cannabis and Cannabinoids 2 Background After alcohol, cannabis (also referred to as marijuana), is the most widely used psychoactive substance in Canada. According to the 2013 Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drug Use Survey (CTADS), 10.6% of Canadians aged 15 years and older reported using cannabis in the past year (Statistics Canada, 2015), virtually unchanged from 10.2

2016 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

96. Salt tolerance of a wild ecotype of vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides L.) in southern China Full Text available with Trip Pro

Salt tolerance of a wild ecotype of vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides L.) in southern China Vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides L.) is widely used in more than 120 countries for land management (e.g. rehabilitation of saline lands). A wild ecotype of vetiver grass was found in southern China in the 1950s, but little is known about its adaptability to saline stress. For the purpose of understanding its tolerance to salinity as well as corresponding tolerance mechanisms, in a greenhouse (...) in leaves. Moreover, increasing NaCl levels significantly increased Na+ but decreased K+ concentrations in both roots and leaves. The leaves had higher K+ concentrations at all NaCl levels, but lower Na+ concentrations compared to the roots, thereby maintaining higher K+/Na+ ratio in leaves.Our results showed that the salinity threshold of this wild vetiver grass is about 100 mM NaCl, i.e. highly tolerant to salt stress. This wild vetiver grass has a high ability to exclude Na+ and retain K+ in its

2016 Botanical studies

97. Cannabinoid Buccal Spray for Chronic Non-Cancer or Neuropathic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness, Safety, and Guidelines

Cannabinoid Buccal Spray for Chronic Non-Cancer or Neuropathic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness, Safety, and Guidelines Cannabinoid Buccal Spray for Chronic Non-Cancer or Neuropathic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness, Safety, and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Cannabinoid Buccal Spray for Chronic Non-Cancer or Neuropathic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness, Safety, and Guidelines Cannabinoid Buccal Spray for Chronic Non-Cancer or Neuropathic Pain

2016 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

98. Amyloid proteotoxicity initiates an inflammatory response blocked by cannabinoids Full Text available with Trip Pro

Amyloid proteotoxicity initiates an inflammatory response blocked by cannabinoids The beta amyloid (Aβ) and other aggregating proteins in the brain increase with age and are frequently found within neurons. The mechanistic relationship between intracellular amyloid, aging and neurodegeneration is not, however, well understood. We use a proteotoxicity model based upon the inducible expression of Aβ in a human central nervous system nerve cell line to characterize a distinct form of nerve cell (...) death caused by intracellular Aβ. It is shown that intracellular Aβ initiates a toxic inflammatory response leading to the cell's demise. Aβ induces the expression of multiple proinflammatory genes and an increase in both arachidonic acid and eicosanoids, including prostaglandins that are neuroprotective and leukotrienes that potentiate death. Cannabinoids such as tetrahydrocannabinol stimulate the removal of intraneuronal Aβ, block the inflammatory response, and are protective. Altogether

2016 NPJ aging and mechanisms of disease

99. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis - Respiratory Effects of Cannabis Smoking

. European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, 32(6), 834–838. Bifulco, M., Laezza, C., Pisanti, S., & Gazzerro, P . (2006). Cannabinoids and cancer: pros and cons of an antitumour strategy. British Journal of Pharmacology, 148(2), 123–135. Bloor, R. N., Wang, T. S., Španel, P ., & Smith, D. (2008). Ammonia release from heated ‘street’cannabis leaf and its potential toxic effects on cannabis users. Addiction, 103(10), 1671–1677. Callaghan, R., Allebeck, P ., & Sidorchuk, A. (2013). Marijuana use and risk (...) and other cannabinoids in confiscated marijuana from 1980–1997. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 45(1), 24–30. Exley, C., Begum, A., Woolley, M. P ., & Bloor, R. N. (2006). Aluminum in tobacco and cannabis and smoking- related disease. American Journal of Medicine, 119(3), 276.e9–276.e11. Gargani, Y., Bishop, P ., & Denning, D. W. (2011). Too many mouldy joints—marijuana and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis. Mediterranean Journal of Hematology and Infectious Diseases, 3(1), e2011005. Gauderman, W. J., Avol

2016 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

100. Cannabinoids Ease Chronic Nonmalignant Neuropathic Pain

to only a 24% reduction in those taking the placebo. Furthermore, Ware et al. reported that a single inhalation of 25mg of 9.4% tetrahydrocannabinol herbal cannabis three times daily for five days reduced the pain threshold. Nurmikko et al. used a specific extract of Cannabis (Sativex) and reported a greater reduction in pain compared to the provided placebo by 30%. Evidence Search (("cannabis"[MeSH Terms] OR "cannabis"[All Fields] OR "marijuana"[All Fields]) AND ("pain management"[MeSH Terms (...) neuropathic pain. Specialty/Discipline (Oral Medicine/Pathology/Radiology) (General Dentistry) (Basic Science) Keywords Marijuana, Pain Management, Neuropathic Pain, Cannabinoids ID# 3037 Date of submission: 03/20/2016 E-mail patelnc@livemail.uthscsa.edu Author Nikita Patel Co-author(s) Co-author(s) e-mail Faculty mentor/Co-author Edward F. Wright, DDS, MS Faculty mentor/Co-author e-mail WrightE2@uthscsa.edu Basic Science Rationale (Mechanisms that may account for and/or explain the clinical question, i.e

2016 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library