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Top results for cannabis

61. Cannabis and Canada?s children and youth

Cannabis and Canada?s children and youth Cannabis is the most common illicit drug used worldwide and it is used frequently by Canadian teenagers. Cannabis use during adolescence can cause functional and structural changes to the developing brain, leading to damage. Marijuana use in this age group is strongly linked to: cannabis dependence and other substance use disorders; the initiation and maintenance of tobacco smoking; an increased presence of mental illness, including depression, anxiety (...) and psychosis; impaired neurological development and cognitive decline; and diminished school performance and lifetime achievement. Rates of acute medical care and hospitalization for younger children who have ingested cannabis unintentionally are increasing. Ongoing debate concerning cannabis regulation in Canada makes paying close attention to the evidence for its health effects and ensuring that appropriate safeguards are in place, vital public health priorities. Keywords: Adolescents, CUD, CWS

2017 Canadian Paediatric Society

62. Cost of Cannabis Collisions in Canadian Provinces in 2012 [infographic]

Cost of Cannabis Collisions in Canadian Provinces in 2012 [infographic] COST PER INCIDENT © Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction 2017. ® State Farm and related trademarks and logos are registered trademarks owned by State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, used under licence by Certas Home and Auto Insurance Company and certain of its affiliates. To learn more read the report at a glance PROPERTY DAMAGE ONLY $10,700 68 % $84,600 59 % $8,532,200 61 % INJURIES VICTIMS (...) BY COLLISION TYPE FATALITIES Cost of Cannabis Collisions in Canadian Provinces in 2012 $1.09 BILLION in economic and social costs 7,794 75 4,407 THOSE 34 YEARS OF AGE AND YOUNGER ACCOUNT FOR APPROXIMATELY + + + OF THESE COSTS $658 Million 16–34 YEAR OLDS ACCOUNT FOR THE MAJORITY OF VICTIMS Reference: Wettlaufer, A., Florica, R.O., Asbridge, M., Beirness, D., Brubacher, J., Callaghan, J.R., … Rehm, J. (2017). Estimating the harms and costs of cannabis-attributable collisions in the Canadian provinces. Drug

2017 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

63. Collisions Attributable to Cannabis: Estimating the Harms and Costs in the Canadian Provinces (Report at a Glance)

Collisions Attributable to Cannabis: Estimating the Harms and Costs in the Canadian Provinces (Report at a Glance) www.ccsa.ca • www.cclt.ca Report at a Glance Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction • Centre canadien sur les dépendances et l’usage de substances Page 1 Collisions Attributable to Cannabis: Estimating the Harms and Costs in the Canadian Provinces After alcohol, cannabis is the most widely used psychoactive substance in Canada and cannabinoids are among the most common (...) psychoactive substances found in dead and injured drivers in Canada (Beasley & Beirness, 2011; Brubacher et al., 2016). In 2012, approximately 10% of Canadians aged 15 and older used cannabis and just under half of those reported driving within two hours of using it (Health Canada, 2012). However, there remains a lot that we don’t know about the extent and costs associated with driving under the influence of cannabis (DUIC). As Canada is poised to introduce legislation to regulate cannabis, conversations

2017 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

64. Treatment Satisfaction During Sublingual Immunotherapy with a Five-Grass Pollen Tablet for Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis: A Prospective, Non-Interventional Study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Treatment Satisfaction During Sublingual Immunotherapy with a Five-Grass Pollen Tablet for Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis: A Prospective, Non-Interventional Study Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is a safe/well-tolerated alternative to allergen injection immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). Patient adherence is essential and patient-related outcome measures including treatment satisfaction are informative/indicative of adherence.The aim was to assess treatment satisfaction (...) with five-grass pollen tablet SLIT under real-life conditions.Treatment satisfaction among adults taking SLIT with a five-grass pollen tablet for grass pollen-related ARC was assessed with QUARTIS, a self-report questionnaire dedicated to the management of patients treated with SLIT for ARC. This 1-year prospective, non-interventional, post-authorization study was conducted in Germany between 2008 and 2010.Of the 327 patients treated with the five-grass pollen tablet, 253 completed the QUARTIS

2017 Drugs - real world outcomes

65. Endo-cannabinoids system and the toxicity of cannabinoids with a biotechnological approach Full Text available with Trip Pro

. Relevant studies were retrieved using major electronic databases such as PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, Scopus, and Google Scholar. The extensive use of Cannabis Sativa L. (C. Sativa) and its derivatives/analogues such as the nonpsychoactive dimethyl heptyl homolog (CBG-DMH), and tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) amongst juveniles and adults have been enhanced in recent years. Cannabinoids play a crucial role in the induction of respiratory, reproductive, immune and carcinogenic effects; however, potential data (...) Endo-cannabinoids system and the toxicity of cannabinoids with a biotechnological approach Cannabinoids have shown diverse and critical effects on the body systems, which alter the physiological functions. Synthetic cannabinoids are comparatively innovative misuse drugs with respect to their nature of synthesis. Synthetic cannabinoids therapy in healthy, chain smokers, and alcoholic individuals cause damage to the immune and nervous system, eventually leading to intoxication throughout the body

2017 EXCLI journal

66. Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety

-randomized studies were identified regarding the safety of cannabis use (medical or recreational) during pregnancy for pregnant women and their children. Tags cannabinoids, cannabis, marijuana abuse, pregnancy, pregnant women, teratogens, gynecology/obstetrics, Maternal, Gestation, Abnormality, Fetal, marijuana, marihuana Files Rapid Response Summary of Abstracts Published : April 26, 2017 Related Content Follow us: © 2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health Get our newsletter: (...) Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety Published on: April 26, 2017 Project Number: RB1087-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type: Report Question What is the clinical evidence regarding the safety of cannabis use during pregnancy? Key Message Two systematic reviews with meta-analyses and nine non

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

67. The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines

, and it may decrease the need for opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tricyclic antidepressants, dexamethasone and ondansetron when used concomitantly. No evidence-based guidelines were identified. Tags mental health, cannabinoids, cannabis, drug interactions, marijuana smoking, pharmaceutical preparations, receptors, cannabinoid, other miscellaneous topics, marijuana, complementary medicine, illicit substance, Alcohol, Therapeutic, marihuana Files Rapid Response Summary with Critical Appraisal (...) The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines Published on: April 19, 2017 Project Number: RC0878-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

68. Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines

are the evidence-based guidelines associated with the use of medical cannabis in adults with addiction being treated in residential transition/addiction programs? Key Message No relevant literature was identified regarding the clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, or evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of medical cannabis in adults with addictions being treated in residential transition/addiction programs. Tags cannabinoids, cannabis, residential treatment, substance abuse treatment centers (...) Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

69. National Research Agenda on the Health Impacts of Non-Medical Cannabis Use

in recent years, corresponding to a shift in the composition of cannabinoids in the strains of cannabis being consumed. These changes might make older studies less relevant to understanding the current health impacts of cannabis use. Attendees noted the length of time it will take to determine the long-term impacts of chronic cannabis use, particularly with respect to clarifying causality and the permanence of observed effects. The group agreed that understanding long-term impacts will require (...) Research Agenda on the Health Impacts of Non-Medical Cannabis Use Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse •Centre canadien de lutte contre les toxicomanies Page 4 ? When it is used in combination with other substances (e.g., pharmaceutical, recreational or nutraceutical5 substances); and ? When substituted for other substances (e.g., what are the opioid-sparing and substitution effects of cannabis and cannabinoids)? • Validation of existing research: What research needs to be redone and which data need

2017 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

70. Interaction of marijuana and alcohol on fatal motor vehicle crash risk: a case–control study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Interaction of marijuana and alcohol on fatal motor vehicle crash risk: a case–control study Concurrent use of marijuana and alcohol in drivers is of increasing concern but its role in crash causation has not been well understood.Using a case-control design, we assessed the individual and joint effects of marijuana and alcohol use on fatal crash risk. Cases (n = 1944) were drivers fatally injured in motor vehicle crashes in the United States at specific times in 2006, 2007 and 2008. Controls (...) (n = 7719) were drivers who participated in the 2007 National Roadside Survey of Alcohol and Drug Use by Drivers.Overall, cases were significantly more likely than controls to test positive for marijuana (12.2% vs. 5.9%, p < 0.0001), alcohol (57.8% vs. 7.7%, p < 0.0001) and both marijuana and alcohol (8.9% vs. 0.8%, p < 0.0001). Compared to drivers testing negative for alcohol and marijuana, the adjusted odds ratios of fatal crash involvement were 16.33 [95% confidence interval (CI): 14.23, 18.75

2017 Injury epidemiology

71. The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety

cannabis with other medications? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the interaction of the use of medical cannabis with other medications? Key Message Two systematic reviews and one non-randomized study were identified regarding the safety of the use of medical cannabis with other medications. Tags cannabinoids, cannabis, drug interactions, drug therapy, marijuana smoking, pharmaceutical preparations, marihuana, marijuana, complementary medicine, Therapeutic, Alcohol, illicit substance (...) The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety | CADTH.ca Find the information you need The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety Published on: February 23, 2017 Project Number: RA0896-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Reference List Result type: Report Question What is the clinical evidence regarding the safety of the use of medical

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

72. Effect of 2 Years of Treatment With Sublingual Grass Pollen Immunotherapy on Nasal Response to Allergen Challenge at 3 Years Among Patients With Moderate to Severe Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis: The GRASS Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of 2 Years of Treatment With Sublingual Grass Pollen Immunotherapy on Nasal Response to Allergen Challenge at 3 Years Among Patients With Moderate to Severe Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis: The GRASS Randomized Clinical Trial. Sublingual immunotherapy and subcutaneous immunotherapy are effective in seasonal allergic rhinitis. Three years of continuous treatment with subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy has been shown to improve symptoms for at least 2 years following (...) discontinuation of treatment.To assess whether 2 years of treatment with grass pollen sublingual immunotherapy, compared with placebo, provides improved nasal response to allergen challenge at 3-year follow-up.A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-parallel-group study performed in a single academic center, Imperial College London, of adult patients with moderate to severe seasonal allergic rhinitis (interfering with usual daily activities or sleep). First enrollment was March 2011, last follow-up

2017 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

73. Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis

in Canada in 2011 were recorded as being primarily due to a cannabinoid-related disorder (Young & Jesseman, 2014). Cannabis use can also result in decreased ability to safely drive a motor vehicle. Cannabis delays reaction time, affects a driver’s ability to focus and causes variation in speed and steering. Driving while impaired by cannabis can lead to a crash risk double that of a sober driver (Asbridge, Hayden, & Cartwright, 2012), which is concerning as data from a recent roadside survey in Ontario (...) as there is no legal age of access to purchase cannabis. One participant noted: “Well, I mean if I was 14 I could buy marijuana, but I could not walk into a liquor store and buy alcohol. You need someone else to buy it for you.” It was also used in some cases as an alternative to alcohol. One respondent reported availability of cannabis online: I forgot to mention this earlier, but there’s another way you can get marijuana… It’s called the deep web which you need to download a special browser for that but it’s

2017 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

74. Benefits and Harms of Cannabis in Chronic Pain or PTSD

Benefits and Harms of Cannabis in Chronic Pain or PTSD Management Briefs eBrief-no122 -- Enter search terms Button to search HSRD ® Inside VA Budget and Performance Inside the News Room National Observances Special Events » » » » » Management Briefs eBrief-no122 -- Health Services Research & Development Management eBrief no. 122 » Issue 122 February 2017 The report is a product of the VA/HSR&D Evidence Synthesis Program. Benefits and Harms of Cannabis in Chronic Pain or PTSD: A Systematic (...) Review Recent studies suggest that from 45% to 80% of individuals who seek cannabis for medical purposes do so for pain management, and an estimated 6% to 39% of patients who are prescribed opioid medication for pain also use cannabis. In addition, more than one-third of patients seeking cannabis for medical purposes cite post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as the primary reason for the request. Approximately 15% of Veterans who are treated in VA outpatient PTSD clinics report recent (past six

2017 Veterans Affairs - R&D

75. Structure and function of S9 segment of grass carp reovirus Anhui strain Full Text available with Trip Pro

Structure and function of S9 segment of grass carp reovirus Anhui strain A highly virulent grass carp reovirus (GCRV) strain, named GCRV-AH528, was recently purified from a diseased grass carp with hemorrhage disease in Anhui, China. GCRV-AH528 S9 segment was 1320 nucleotides in length and encoded a 418 amino acid VP6 protein. BLAST search showed that the VP6 protein owned a conserved domain belonging to the reoviral σ2 family. Phylogenetic analysis of VP6 presented that GCRV-AH528 belonged

2017 Virusdisease

76. Medical Marijuana for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

Number: RC0838-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of medical marijuana for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adults? What is the clinical effectiveness of synthetic cannabinoids for the treatment of PTSD in adults? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of medical marijuana or synthetic cannabinoids in adult patients with PTSD? Key Message Based (...) on one systematic review (SR) which included six studies in adults with PTSD, there is evidence from very low-quality studies to support the efficacy of smoked marijuana, oral THC, and nabilone in reducing some symptoms of PTSD. Side effects, described as mild to moderate were reported for only one retrospective chart review, in which nabilone was discontinued in 28% of patients. There were no guidelines identified regarding the use of medical marijuana or cannabinoids in PTSD. Files IN BRIEF

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

77. Trends in marijuana use among pregnant and non-pregnant reproductive-aged women, 2002–2014 Full Text available with Trip Pro

Trends in marijuana use among pregnant and non-pregnant reproductive-aged women, 2002–2014 27992619 2017 02 09 2018 11 13 1538-3598 317 2 2017 01 10 JAMA JAMA Trends in Marijuana Use Among Pregnant and Nonpregnant Reproductive-Aged Women, 2002-2014. 207-209 10.1001/jama.2016.17383 Brown Qiana L QL Columbia University, New York, New York. Sarvet Aaron L AL Columbia University, New York, New York. Shmulewitz Dvora D Columbia University, New York, New York. Martins Silvia S SS Columbia (...) University, New York, New York. Wall Melanie M MM Columbia University, New York, New York. Hasin Deborah S DS Columbia University, New York, New York. eng R01 DA034244 DA NIDA NIH HHS United States R01 DA037866 DA NIDA NIH HHS United States T32 DA031099 DA NIDA NIH HHS United States Journal Article United States JAMA 7501160 0098-7484 AIM IM Am J Nurs. 2017 Jun;117(6):70-71 28541996 Adolescent Adult Female Humans Informed Consent Marijuana Abuse epidemiology Pregnancy Pregnant Women Prevalence Surveys

2017 JAMA

78. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Cannabis Use and Driving ? An Update

who are impaired by cannabis. Background After alcohol, cannabis, also referred to as marijuana, is the most widely used psychoactive substance in Canada. According to the 2015 Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS), 12.3% of Canadians aged 15 years and older reported using cannabis at least once in the past year (Statistics Canada, 2016), significantly higher than the 10.6 in 2013. The use of cannabis is generally more prevalent among youth, with 20.6% of youth aged 15 to 19 and 29.7 (...) is a tobacco-like greenish or brownish material consisting of the dried flowering, fruiting tops and leaves of the cannabis plant, Cannabis sativa. Hashish or cannabis resin is the dried brown or black resinous secretion of the flowering tops of the cannabis plant. The acute effects of cannabis include euphoria and relaxation, changes in perception, time distortion, deficits in attention span and memory, body tremors, and impaired motor functioning. It is a controlled substance under the Controlled Drugs

2017 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

79. Effects of early, computerized brief interventions on risky alcohol use and risky cannabis use among young people Full Text available with Trip Pro

. While marijuana refers to the cannabis leaves or other crude plant material, the term hashish describes the drug produced by drying the resin exuded by the marijuana plant ( ). Cannabis is commonly smoked, with or without being mixed with tobacco, but can also be consumed orally. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) has estimated that between 2.9 to 4.3 percent of the world population aged 15‐64 (between 129 and 191 million people) used cannabis at least once in 2008 (UN, 2010a (...) ). The use of marijuana and hashish in young people increases with age ( ). Cannabis use has increased in the US since 2007 in the 13 to 18 year age group and daily marijuana use reached a 30‐year peak among high school students aged 17‐18 years in 2011 ( ). Moreover, in 2015, the rate of daily marijuana use among 12 th graders (students aged 17‐18) in the US surpassed that of daily tobacco use for the first time (NIDA, 2015). Regular cannabis use among young people presents a social burden due to costs

2017 Campbell Collaboration