Latest & greatest articles for cannabis

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on cannabis or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on cannabis and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for cannabis

41. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Chronic Use and Cognitive Functioning and Mental Health ? An Update

Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Chronic Use and Cognitive Functioning and Mental Health ? An Update Key Points • Chronic cannabis use is related to mild cognitive impairments and an increased risk for poor mental health. These relationships raise the possibility that its use can also interfere with academic, workplace and social functioning, particularly in young people. There is a need for efforts that focus on preventing, delaying and reducing the use of cannabis by adolescents and young (...) adults. • Chronic cannabis use has been associated with mild impairments of memory, attention and other cognitive functions. The degree to which these impairments are reversible following cessation of cannabis use is uncertain. • There is emerging evidence that chronic cannabis use can affect brain development and functioning in areas that are important for cognitive and emotional processes. • Longitudinal studies indicate that chronic cannabis use and an earlier onset of use is associated

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse2016

42. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Medical Use of Cannabis and Cannabinoids ? An Update

Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Medical Use of Cannabis and Cannabinoids ? An Update Key Points • Healthcare practitioners need access to the best available scientific evidence to help patients make informed decisions about the medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids. There is a great need for well-designed prospective clinical trials in Canada that assess the efficacy of cannabis and cannabinoids in treating various conditions. • Evidence suggests that cannabis and cannabinoids are effective (...) for the relief of nausea and vomiting, and certain types of pain, as well as the stimulation of appetite. However, there is insufficient research to promote cannabis and cannabinoids as a primary or first line option for these symptoms. • More research is needed to determine the risks associated with the medical use of cannabis. However, research on chronic cannabis use has linked it to risks and harms such as reduced cognitive functioning and negative respiratory symptoms. • Patients who ingest cannabis

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse2016

43. Opioids Out, Cannabis In Negotiating the Unknowns in Patient Care for Chronic Pain

Opioids Out, Cannabis In Negotiating the Unknowns in Patient Care for Chronic Pain 27802551 2016 12 13 2018 11 13 1538-3598 316 17 2016 Nov 01 JAMA JAMA Opioids Out, Cannabis In: Negotiating the Unknowns in Patient Care for Chronic Pain. 1763-1764 10.1001/jama.2016.13677 Choo Esther K EK Center for Policy and Research in Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. Feldstein Ewing Sarah W SW Department of Psychiatry, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. Lovejoy (...) 0 Cannabinoids 0 Medical Marijuana AIM IM JAMA Intern Med. 2014 Oct;174(10):1673-4 25156148 BMC Med Educ. 2015 Mar 19;15:52 25888752 JAMA. 2015 Jun 23-30;313(24):2456-73 26103030 JAMA. 2016 Apr 19;315(15):1624-45 26977696 Analgesia trends Analgesics therapeutic use Analgesics, Opioid therapeutic use Cannabinoids therapeutic use Chronic Pain drug therapy Humans Legislation, Drug Medical Marijuana therapeutic use 2016 11 2 6 0 2016 12 15 6 0 2016 11 2 6 0 ppublish 27802551 2576617 10.1001/jama

JAMA2016 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

44. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis - Respiratory Effects of Cannabis Smoking

Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis - Respiratory Effects of Cannabis Smoking Key Points • Cannabis smoking has been consistently related to a greater incidence of cough, wheeze, aggravation of asthma, sore throat, chest tightness, shortness of breath and hoarse voice. • There is emerging evidence that quitting cannabis smoking can reverse some of the negative respiratory symptoms associated with its use. • Cannabis smoke contains many of the same chemicals as tobacco smoke, several of which (...) are known carcinogens. Evidence for a link between cannabis smoking and serious conditions such as lung cancer is mixed. Further research is needed to clarify whether cannabis smoke is a causal factor for lung cancer. • Many recent epidemiological studies suggest no causal relationship between cannabis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), at least in low to moderate cumulative doses. • Further research is needed to clarify whether heavy cannabis smoking is a causal factor for COPD. Because

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse2016

45. Is the medical use of cannabis a therapeutic option for children?

Is the medical use of cannabis a therapeutic option for children? Is the medical use of cannabis a therapeutic option for children? | Position statements and practice points | Canadian Paediatric Society Protecting and promoting the health and well-being of children and youth CPS Member Login | Who We Are What We Do Get Involved Education/CPD Publications Careers > Share POSITION STATEMENT Is the medical use of cannabis a therapeutic option for children? Posted: Feb 5 2016 The Canadian (...) Paediatric Society gives permission to print single copies of this document from our website. For permission to reprint or reproduce multiple copies, please see our . Principal author(s) Michael J Rieder; Canadian Paediatric Society , Paediatr Child Health 2016;21(1):31-34 Abstract Cannabis is a psychoactive compound with a long history of recreational and therapeutic use. Current considerations regarding cannabis use for medical purposes in children have been stimulated by recent case reports describing

Canadian Paediatric Society2016

46. High-potency cannabis increases the risk of psychosis

High-potency cannabis increases the risk of psychosis High-potency cannabis increases the risk of psychosis | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal (...) accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here High-potency cannabis increases the risk of psychosis Article Text Causes and risk factors High-potency cannabis increases the risk of psychosis Emma Barkus Correspondence to University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia; ebarkus{at}uow.edu.au Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available for this article. ABSTRACT FROM: Di Forti M, Marconi A, Carra, E, et al

Evidence-Based Mental Health2016

47. Talking Pot with Youth: A Cannabis Communication Guide for Youth Allies

Talking Pot with Youth: A Cannabis Communication Guide for Youth Allies A Cannabis Communication Guide for Youth Allies Co-designed with input from youth and youth allies Acknowledgements This guide is stronger because of the expertise of the youth and youth allies who were involved in its creation. Authors: Katie Fleming, MA, and Anna McKiernan, MA This project was supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and benefited from the advice of Health Canada. CCSA would like (...) to acknowledge Kiran Somjee, RN, National Priority Advisor and Chealsea De Moor, MA, Knowledge Broker for their contributions in the development and dissemination of this resource. © Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction, 2018. CCSA, 500–75 Albert Street Ottawa, ON K1P 5E7 | Tel.: 613-235-4048 | Email: info@ccsa.ca Suggested citation Fleming, K., & McKiernan, A. (2018). Cannabis Communication Guide for Youth Allies. Ottawa, Ont.: Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction. ISBN: 978-1-77178-505

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse2016

48. Psychological and psychosocial interventions for cannabis cessation in adults: a systematic review short report

Psychological and psychosocial interventions for cannabis cessation in adults: a systematic review short report Psychological and psychosocial interventions for cannabis cessation in adults: a systematic review short report Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information (...) you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} Study aims to systematically review the clinical effectiveness of psychological and psychosocial interventions for cannabis cessation in adults who use cannabis regularly. Courses of cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) and one to two sessions of motivational interviewing (MI) improved outcomes in a self-selected population of cannabis users. Contingency management enhanced long-term outcomes

NIHR HTA programme2015

49. Cannabis use and treatment resistance in first episode psychosis: a natural language processing study.

Cannabis use and treatment resistance in first episode psychosis: a natural language processing study. BACKGROUND: Cannabis is frequently used among individuals with first episode psychosis and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. However, little is known about the effect of cannabis use on the response to antipsychotic medications and how use could affect outcomes. Using natural language processing on clinical data from a large electronic case register, we sought to investigate whether (...) resistance to antipsychotic treatment mediated poor clinical outcomes associated with cannabis use. METHODS: Data were obtained from 2026 people with first episode psychosis in south London, UK. Cannabis use documented in free text clinical records was identified with natural language processing. Data for age, sex, ethnicity, marital status, psychotic disorder diagnosis, subsequent hospital admission, and number of unique antipsychotic medications prescribed were obtained using the Clinical Record

Lancet2015

53. Use of Cannabis for Medicinal Purposes

Use of Cannabis for Medicinal Purposes POSITION PAPER ROYAL AUSTRALASIAN COLLEGE OF SURGEONS Subject: Use of Cannabis for Medicinal Purposes Ref. No. REL-GOV-034 Division: Relationships & Advocacy Document Owner: Director, Relationships & Advocacy Authorised By: Governance & Advocacy Committee Page 1 of 3 Original Issue: Version: Approval Date: Review Date: June 2015 1 June 2015 June 2018 INTRODUCTION Cannabis is the most commonly used illegal substance in Australia i and New Zealand ii (...) , with a wide body of research to suggest the harmful risks it poses, particularly to those from younger age groups, those with or at risk of psychotic illness, and those who use it on a regular basis iii . ‘Medical cannabis’ applies when cannabis is used for therapeutic and pain relief purposes. The primary medical use of cannabis is relief of symptoms rather than cure of underlying disease. iv Little data is available to distinguish the percentage of cannabis use for medical purposes compared

ASERNIP-S2015

54. Substance Abuse in Canada: The Effects of Cannabis Use during Adolescence (Report)

Substance Abuse in Canada: The Effects of Cannabis Use during Adolescence (Report) 2015 The Effects of Cannabis Use during Adolescence SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN CANADAThis document was published by the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA). CCSA activities and products are made possible through a financial contribution from Health Canada. The views of CCSA do not necessarily represent the views of the Government of Canada. The subjects in the photographs used throughout this publication are models (...) who have no relation to the content. The vignettes are fictional and do not depict any actual person. Suggested citation: George, T., & Vaccarino, F. (Eds.). (2015). Substance abuse in Canada: The Effects of Cannabis Use during Adolescence. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse. © Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse 2015 CCSA, 75 Albert St., Suite 500 Ottawa, ON K1P 5E7 Tel.: 613-235-4048 Email: info@ccsa.ca This document can also be downloaded as a PDF at www.ccsa.ca. Ce document est

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse2015

55. Cannabis Regulation: Lessons Learned in Colorado and Washington State

Cannabis Regulation: Lessons Learned in Colorado and Washington State www.ccsa.ca • www.cclt.ca Cannabis Regulation: Lessons Learned in Colorado and Washington State November 2015 www.ccsa.ca • www.cclat.ca Cannabis Regulation: Lessons Learned in Colorado and Washington State © Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, 2015 CCSA, 500–75 Albert Street Ottawa, ON K1P 5E7 Tel.: 613-235-4048 Email: info@ccsa.ca Production of this document has been made possible through a financial contribution from (...) Health Canada. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of Health Canada. This document can also be downloaded as a PDF at www.ccsa.ca Ce document est également disponible en français sous le titre : Réglementation du cannabis : leçons retenues de l’expérience des États du Colorado et de Washington ISBN 978-1-77178-293-7 Table of Contents Executive Summary 1 Objective 3 Lessons Learned 6 Identify a Clear Purpose to Drive the Overall Approach 6 Develop a Comprehensive

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse2015

56. Environmental factors, including cannabis, are strongly related to the age of onset and morbidity of schizophrenia

Environmental factors, including cannabis, are strongly related to the age of onset and morbidity of schizophrenia Environmental factors, including cannabis, are strongly related to the age of onset and morbidity of schizophrenia | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name (...) or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Environmental factors, including cannabis, are strongly related to the age of onset and morbidity of schizophrenia Article Text Causes and risk factors Environmental factors, including cannabis, are strongly related to the age of onset and morbidity of schizophrenia Vishal

Evidence-Based Mental Health2015

57. Universal Internet-based prevention for alcohol and cannabis use reduces truancy, psychological distress and moral disengagement: A cluster randomised controlled trial

Universal Internet-based prevention for alcohol and cannabis use reduces truancy, psychological distress and moral disengagement: A cluster randomised controlled trial 24823906 2014 07 15 2015 09 30 2014 07 15 1096-0260 65 2014 Aug Preventive medicine Prev Med Universal Internet-based prevention for alcohol and cannabis use reduces truancy, psychological distress and moral disengagement: a cluster randomised controlled trial. 109-15 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.05.003 S0091-7435(14)00160-1 A universal (...) Internet-based preventive intervention has been shown to reduce alcohol and cannabis use. The aim of this study was to examine if this program could also reduce risk-factors associated with substance use in adolescents. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in Sydney, Australia in 2007-2008 to assess the effectiveness of the Internet-based Climate Schools: Alcohol and Cannabis course. The evidence-based course, aimed at reducing alcohol and cannabis use, consists of two sets of six

EvidenceUpdates2014

58. The medical use of cannabis for reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV/AIDS.

The medical use of cannabis for reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV/AIDS. BACKGROUND: The use of cannabis (marijuana) or of its psychoactive ingredient delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as a medicine has been highly contested in many settings.There have been claims that smoked or ingested cannabis, either in its natural form or artificial form (pharmaceutically manufactured drug such as dronabinol), improves the appetites of people with AIDS, results in weight gain and lifts (...) mood, thus improving the quality of life. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this review were to assess whether cannabis (in its natural or artificially produced form), either smoked or ingested, decreases the morbidity or mortality of patients infected with HIV. SEARCH METHODS: The search strategy was conducted to July 2012 and was based on that of the Cochrane HIV/AIDS Review Group. We searched the following databases: CENTRAL/CCTR, MEDLINE and EMBASE. In addition, searching was performed where

Cochrane2013

60. Vulnerability for psychosis at ages 13 and 16 predicts cannabis use at ages 16 and 19, and cannabis use at age 16 predicts psychosis vulnerability at age 19

Vulnerability for psychosis at ages 13 and 16 predicts cannabis use at ages 16 and 19, and cannabis use at age 16 predicts psychosis vulnerability at age 19 Vulnerability for psychosis at ages 13 and 16 predicts cannabis use at ages 16 and 19, and cannabis use at age 16 predicts psychosis vulnerability at age 19 | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal (...) accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Vulnerability for psychosis at ages 13 and 16 predicts cannabis use at ages 16 and 19, and cannabis use at age 16 predicts psychosis vulnerability at age 19 Article Text Children

Evidence-Based Mental Health2013