Latest & greatest articles for cannabis

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Top results for cannabis

22. Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines: A Comprehensive Update of Evidence and Recommendations

Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines: A Comprehensive Update of Evidence and Recommendations 28644037 2017 06 23 2017 07 24 2017 07 24 1541-0048 107 8 2017 Aug American journal of public health Am J Public Health Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines: A Comprehensive Update of Evidence and Recommendations. e1-e12 10.2105/AJPH.2017.303818 Cannabis use is common in North America, especially among young people, and is associated with a risk of various acute and chronic adverse health outcomes. Cannabis (...) control regimes are evolving, for example toward a national legalization policy in Canada, with the aim to improve public health, and thus require evidence-based interventions. As cannabis-related health outcomes may be influenced by behaviors that are modifiable by the user, evidence-based Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines (LRCUG)-akin to similar guidelines in other health fields-offer a valuable, targeted prevention tool to improve public health outcomes. To systematically review, update

EvidenceUpdates2017

23. Severity and outcomes of acute alcoholic pancreatitis in cannabis users

Severity and outcomes of acute alcoholic pancreatitis in cannabis users 28815220 2018 11 13 2415-1289 2 2017 Translational gastroenterology and hepatology Transl Gastroenterol Hepatol Severity and outcomes of acute alcoholic pancreatitis in cannabis users. 60 10.21037/tgh.2017.06.03 Cannabis is the most commonly and widely used illicit drug in the world and is also the most commonly used drug of abuse in alcohol drinkers. Experimental studies have shown conflicting results of the effects (...) of cannabis on the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP). The purpose of this study is to ascertain the clinical effects of simultaneous alcohol and cannabis use on severity at presentation and outcomes of acute alcoholic pancreatitis (AAP). A retrospective review was conducted on the patients discharged with principle or secondary diagnosis of AP using ICD-9 & ICD-10 codes during the time period from January 2006 to December 2015 at a large community-based hospital in Central Georgia. Patients

Translational gastroenterology and hepatology2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

25. Medical Cannabis or Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Insomnia Disorder in Adults: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

Medical Cannabis or Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Insomnia Disorder in Adults: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis or Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Insomnia Disorder in Adults: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Medical Cannabis or Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Insomnia Disorder in Adults: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis or Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Insomnia Disorder in Adults: Clinical (...) Effectiveness and Guidelines Published on: June 26, 2017 Project Number: RB1113-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of medical cannabis or cannabinoids for the treatment of insomnia disorder in adults? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of medical cannabis or cannabinoids for the treatment of insomnia disorder in adults? Key Message One non-randomized study was identified regarding

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review2017

26. Cost of Cannabis Collisions in Canadian Provinces in 2012 [infographic]

Cost of Cannabis Collisions in Canadian Provinces in 2012 [infographic] COST PER INCIDENT © Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction 2017. ® State Farm and related trademarks and logos are registered trademarks owned by State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, used under licence by Certas Home and Auto Insurance Company and certain of its affiliates. To learn more read the report at a glance PROPERTY DAMAGE ONLY $10,700 68 % $84,600 59 % $8,532,200 61 % INJURIES VICTIMS (...) BY COLLISION TYPE FATALITIES Cost of Cannabis Collisions in Canadian Provinces in 2012 $1.09 BILLION in economic and social costs 7,794 75 4,407 THOSE 34 YEARS OF AGE AND YOUNGER ACCOUNT FOR APPROXIMATELY + + + OF THESE COSTS $658 Million 16–34 YEAR OLDS ACCOUNT FOR THE MAJORITY OF VICTIMS Reference: Wettlaufer, A., Florica, R.O., Asbridge, M., Beirness, D., Brubacher, J., Callaghan, J.R., … Rehm, J. (2017). Estimating the harms and costs of cannabis-attributable collisions in the Canadian provinces. Drug

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse2017

27. Collisions Attributable to Cannabis: Estimating the Harms and Costs in the Canadian Provinces (Report at a Glance)

Collisions Attributable to Cannabis: Estimating the Harms and Costs in the Canadian Provinces (Report at a Glance) www.ccsa.ca • www.cclt.ca Report at a Glance Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction • Centre canadien sur les dépendances et l’usage de substances Page 1 Collisions Attributable to Cannabis: Estimating the Harms and Costs in the Canadian Provinces After alcohol, cannabis is the most widely used psychoactive substance in Canada and cannabinoids are among the most common (...) psychoactive substances found in dead and injured drivers in Canada (Beasley & Beirness, 2011; Brubacher et al., 2016). In 2012, approximately 10% of Canadians aged 15 and older used cannabis and just under half of those reported driving within two hours of using it (Health Canada, 2012). However, there remains a lot that we don’t know about the extent and costs associated with driving under the influence of cannabis (DUIC). As Canada is poised to introduce legislation to regulate cannabis, conversations

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse2017

28. Cannabis and Canada?s children and youth

Cannabis and Canada?s children and youth Cannabis and Canada’s children and youth | Position statements and practice points | Cannabis and Canada’s children and youth | Canadian Paediatric Society Protecting and promoting the health and well-being of children and youth CPS Member Login | Who We Are What We Do Get Involved Education/CPD Publications Careers > Share POSITION STATEMENT Cannabis and Canada’s children and youth Posted: Nov 24 2016 The Canadian Paediatric Society gives permission (...) to print single copies of this document from our website. For permission to reprint or reproduce multiple copies, please see our . Principal author(s) Christina N Grant, Richard E Bélanger; Canadian Paediatric Society , Abstract Cannabis is the most common illicit drug used worldwide and it is used frequently by Canadian teenagers. Cannabis use during adolescence can cause functional and structural changes to the developing brain, leading to damage. Marijuana use in this age group is strongly linked

Canadian Paediatric Society2017

29. Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety

Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety Published on: April 26, 2017 Project Number: RB1087-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drugs Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type: Report Question What is the clinical evidence regarding the safety of cannabis use during pregnancy? Key Message Two systematic reviews with meta-analyses and nine non (...) -randomized studies were identified regarding the safety of cannabis use (medical or recreational) during pregnancy for pregnant women and their children. Tags cannabinoids, cannabis, marijuana abuse, pregnancy, pregnant women, teratogens, gynecology/obstetrics, Maternal, Gestation, Abnormality, Fetal, marijuana, marihuana Files Rapid Response Summary of Abstracts Published : April 26, 2017 Follow us: © 2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health Get our newsletter:

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review2017

30. The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines

The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines Published on: April 19, 2017 Project Number: RC0878-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drugs Report Type: Summary (...) with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the clinical evidence regarding the safety of the use of medical cannabis with other medications? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the interaction of the use of medical cannabis with other medications? Key Message Limited data on medical cannabis and drug-drug interactions were obtained from a low quality systematic review. Nabilone may have additive depressant effects with diazepam when taken together with alcohol and codeine

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review2017

31. Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines

Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review (...) of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines Published on: April 5, 2017 Project Number: RC0870-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drugs Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of medical cannabis in adults with addictions being treated in residential transition/addiction programs? What is the cost-effectiveness of medical cannabis in adults with addictions being treated in residential transition/addiction programs? What

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review2017

32. Effect of early, brief computerized interventions on risky alcohol and cannabis use among young people

Effect of early, brief computerized interventions on risky alcohol and cannabis use among young people

Campbell Collaboration2017

33. Identifying the Impacts of Cannabis Legalization on Youth, and the Responses that can be Taken by Public Institutions

Identifying the Impacts of Cannabis Legalization on Youth, and the Responses that can be Taken by Public Institutions

McMaster Health Forum2017

34. National Research Agenda on the Health Impacts of Non-Medical Cannabis Use

National Research Agenda on the Health Impacts of Non-Medical Cannabis Use www.ccsa.ca • www.cclt.ca Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse •Centre canadien de lutte contre les toxicomanies Page 1 National Research Agenda on the Health Impacts of Non-Medical Cannabis Use The Issue As Canada moves towards regulating cannabis for non-medical use, there is a pressing need for evidence on the health-related effects of non-medical cannabis use to inform policy decisions. Legislative changes (...) and the impact of these changes must be informed by current, high- quality research and must be monitored to avoid negative impacts on the health of Canadians. Because cannabis use, regulations and impacts cross jurisdictional and sectoral boundaries, generating this research requires a collaborative approach. Expert and Stakeholder Meeting Since 2008, CCSA has worked with federal, provincial and municipal partners at the bureaucratic and political levels to provide evidence- informed advice and analysis

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse2017

35. The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety

The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety | CADTH.ca Find the information you need The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety Published on: February 23, 2017 Project Number: RA0896-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drugs Report Type: Reference List Result type: Report Question What is the clinical evidence regarding the safety of the use (...) of medical cannabis with other medications? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the interaction of the use of medical cannabis with other medications? Key Message Two systematic reviews and one non-randomized study were identified regarding the safety of the use of medical cannabis with other medications. Tags cannabinoids, cannabis, drug interactions, drug therapy, marijuana smoking, pharmaceutical preparations, marihuana, marijuana, complementary medicine, Therapeutic, Alcohol, illicit

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review2017

36. Benefits and Harms of Cannabis in Chronic Pain or PTSD

Benefits and Harms of Cannabis in Chronic Pain or PTSD Management Briefs Search the HSR&D website Button to search HSRD ® Inside VA Budget and Performance Inside the News Room National Observances Special Events » » » » » Management Briefs Health Services Research & Development Management Brief no. 122 » Issue 122 February 2017 The systematic review reported on here is a product of the VA/HSR&D Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) Evidence-Based Synthesis Program. Benefits and Harms (...) of Cannabis in Chronic Pain or PTSD: A Systematic Review Recent studies suggest that from 45% to 80% of individuals who seek cannabis for medical purposes do so for pain management, and an estimated 6% to 39% of patients who are prescribed opioid medication for pain also use cannabis. In addition, more than one-third of patients seeking cannabis for medical purposes cite post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as the primary reason for the request. Approximately 15% of Veterans who are treated in VA

Veterans Affairs - R&D2017

37. Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis

Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis www.ccsa.ca Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis January 201 7 This research report contains strong language and profanity that some readers could find offensive. Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis This document was published by the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA). Suggested citation: McKiernan, A., & Fleming, K. (201 7) Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis, Ottawa, Ont.: Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse. © Canadian Centre on Substance (...) Abuse, 201 7. CCSA, 500–75 Albert Street Ottawa, ON K1P 5E7 Tel.: 613-235-4048 Email: info@ccsa.ca Production of this document has been made possible through a financial contribution from Health Canada. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of Health Canada. This document can also be downloaded as a PDF at www.ccsa.ca Ce document est également disponible en français sous le titre : Les perceptions des jeunes canadiens sur le cannabis ISBN 978-1-77178-371-2Canadian Youth

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse2017

38. Escalation of drug use in early-onset cannabis users vs co-twin controls.

Escalation of drug use in early-onset cannabis users vs co-twin controls. CONTEXT: Previous studies have reported that early initiation of cannabis (marijuana) use is a significant risk factor for other drug use and drug-related problems. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the association between early cannabis use and subsequent progression to use of other drugs and drug abuse/dependence persists after controlling for genetic and shared environmental influences. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey (...) conducted in 1996-2000 among an Australian national volunteer sample of 311 young adult (median age, 30 years) monozygotic and dizygotic same-sex twin pairs discordant for early cannabis use (before age 17 years). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported subsequent nonmedical use of prescription sedatives, hallucinogens, cocaine/other stimulants, and opioids; abuse or dependence on these drugs (including cannabis abuse/dependence); and alcohol dependence. RESULTS: Individuals who used cannabis by age 17

JAMA2017

39. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Cannabis Use and Driving ? An Update

Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Cannabis Use and Driving ? An Update Key Points • Among young drivers, driving after using cannabis is more prevalent than driving after drinking. • Cannabis impairs the cognitive and motor abilities necessary to operate a motor vehicle and doubles the risk of crash involvement. • After alcohol, cannabis is the most commonly detected substance among drivers who die in traffic crashes. • The police have the tools and authority required to detect and arrest drivers (...) who are impaired by cannabis. Background After alcohol, cannabis, also referred to as marijuana, is the most widely used psychoactive substance in Canada. According to the 2015 Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS), 12.3% of Canadians aged 15 years and older reported using cannabis at least once in the past year (Statistics Canada, 2016), significantly higher than the 10.6 in 2013. The use of cannabis is generally more prevalent among youth, with 20.6% of youth aged 15 to 19 and 29.7

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse2017