Latest & greatest articles for cannabis

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Top results for cannabis

1. Barriers to accessing cannabis-based products for medicinal use on NHS prescription

Barriers to accessing cannabis-based products for medicinal use on NHS prescription NHS England » Barriers to accessing cannabis-based products for medicinal use on NHS prescription Search Search Menu Barriers to accessing cannabis-based products for medicinal use on NHS prescription Document first published: 8 August 2019 Page updated: 8 August 2019 Topic: Publication type: This document provides information on the findings and recommendations following NHS England and NHS Improvement’s review (...) of the barriers to prescribing of cannabis-based products for medicinal use. Document PDF 290 KB 20 pages

2019 NHS England

2. Cannabis-based medicinal products

Cannabis-based medicinal products Cannabis-based medicinal products NICE guideline Published: 11 November 2019 www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng144 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, professionals (...) and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Cannabis-based medicinal products (NG144) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 27Contents Contents Overview 4 Who is it for? 4 Recommendations 5 1.1 Intractable nausea and vomiting 5 1.2 Chronic pain

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

3. Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Dementia: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Dementia: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Dementia: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Dementia: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Dementia: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Last updated: July 17, 2019 Project Number: RC1152-000 Product (...) Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of medical cannabis for the treatment of dementia? What are the evidence-based guidelines associated with the use of medical cannabis for the treatment of dementia? Key Message Limited evidence from one systematic review3 and one uncontrolled before-and-after study10 suggested that medical cannabis may be effective for treating agitation, disinhibition, irritability

2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

4. Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Chronic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Chronic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Chronic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Chronic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Chronic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Last updated: July 24, 2019 Project Number: RC1153 (...) -000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of medical cannabis for the treatment of chronic pain? What are the evidence-based guidelines associated with the use of medical cannabis for the treatment of chronic pain? Key Message Based on four overviews (with overlapping systematic reviews), and one systematic review of guidelines,8 there is some suggestion of benefit with cannabis-based medicines

2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

5. Cannabis use in the Immunocompromised increasing rates of Pulmonary Aspergillus

Cannabis use in the Immunocompromised increasing rates of Pulmonary Aspergillus "Cannabis use in the Immunocompromised increasing rates of Pulmonary As" by Molly Burns < > > > > > Title Author Date of Graduation Summer 8-10-2019 Degree Type Capstone Project Degree Name Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies Rights . Abstract Cannabis use is an emerging remedy among immunocompromised patients. The lack of regulation surrounding marijuana treatment creates a culture of concern (...) for patients. The act of inhalation further inhibits these patients’ immune response to pathogens. Additionally, marijuana cultures are heavily contaminated with Aspergillus fungus. This review assesses the evidence for a correlation between cannabis use in the immunocompromised and cases of pulmonary aspergillus. Recommended Citation Burns, Molly, "Cannabis use in the Immunocompromised increasing rates of Pulmonary Aspergillus" (2019). School of Physician Assistant Studies . 676. https

2019 Pacific University EBM Capstone Project

6. A contingency management intervention to reduce cannabis use and time to relapse in early psychosis: the CIRCLE RCT

A contingency management intervention to reduce cannabis use and time to relapse in early psychosis: the CIRCLE RCT A contingency management intervention to reduce cannabis use and time to relapse in early psychosis: the CIRCLE RCT Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find

2019 NIHR HTA programme

7. Understanding the Health Effects of Recreational Cannabis Use: A Focused Practice Question

Understanding the Health Effects of Recreational Cannabis Use: A Focused Practice Question Understanding the Health Effects of Recreational Cannabis Use A Focused Practice Question Region of Peel – Public Health Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Division & Family Health Division August 2019 Please use the following citation when referencing this document: Region of Peel – Public Health. Understanding the health effects of recreational cannabis use: A focused practice question. Mississauga (...) EXTRACTION TABLES 44 1 Key Messages 1. It is difficult to draw firm conclusions on the health effects of recreational cannabis use due to mixed findings and limitations in the evidence. Most studies are observational, and there are inconsistencies in assessing exposure and/or controlling for confounding variables. More research is needed. 2. The evidence is strongest for the associations between: • Cannabis use and respiratory symptoms and bronchitis, motor vehicle crashes, and schizophrenia or other

2019 Peel Health Library

8. Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products

Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products | Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction Search the CCSA website Search Substances and Addiction SPOTLIGHT Health and Public Safety SPOTLIGHT People and Communities SPOTLIGHT Data Trends SPOTLIGHT About Us SPOTLIGHT Menu Search the CCSA website Search Substances and Addiction SPOTLIGHT Health (...) and Public Safety SPOTLIGHT People and Communities SPOTLIGHT Data Trends SPOTLIGHT About Us SPOTLIGHT Breadcrumb Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products Share Topic Summary Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products Publication date: 2019 Author: Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction Provides an overview of edible cannabis products, cannabis extracts and topical cannabis products

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

9. Cannabis: Inhaling vs Ingesting

Cannabis: Inhaling vs Ingesting Cannabis: Inhaling vs Ingesting INHALING — smoking or vaping — INGESTING — eating or drinking — Cannabis smoke or vapour delivers THC, the chemical that gets you high, into your lungs where it passes directly into your bloodstream and then your brain. Edible cannabis travels first to your stomach then to your liver before getting into your bloodstream and brain. The liver converts THC into a stronger form and this combined with the THC from the original product (...) adds to the intensity of the high. To lower your risk of the harmful effects of cannabis, you need to understand the differences between the two most common ways of consuming it. To learn more visit ccsa.ca/cannabis | canada.ca/cannabis TIPS FOR LOWER-RISK USE START OF EFFECTS PEAK EFFECTS LENGTH OF EFFECTS • Ingesting and vaping are less harmful to your lungs than smoking. • If you are new to edible cannabis or cannabis, start low by consuming an edible cannabis product with no more than 2.5 mg

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

10. Know the Health Effects of Cannabis

Know the Health Effects of Cannabis Mental Health Daily or near-daily use of cannabis can contribute to dependence and mental health problems over time. Know the Health Risks of Cannabis Driving Cannabis can impair your motor coordination, judgment and other skills required for safe driving. Respiratory Effects Toxic and carcinogenic chemicals found in tobacco smoke are also found in cannabis smoke, and can affect the lungs and airways. Pregnancy Substances in cannabis are transferred from (...) mother to child and can affect your baby. Not using cannabis if pregnant or breastfeeding is the safest option. Stay Informed ccsa.ca/cannabis canada.ca/cannabis Edible Cannabis Consuming too much THC can lead to over-intoxication, which includes intense anxiety, vomiting and symptoms of psychosis (paranoia). Cannabis Extracts Cannabis extracts with high THC content increase the risk of over- intoxication and addiction.

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

11. Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products

Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products www.ccsa.ca • www.ccdus.ca Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction • Centre canadien sur les dépendances et l’usage de substances Page 1 Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products Edible Cannabis (or Edibles) Edible cannabis (or edibles for short) are products containing cannabinoids that you eat or drink. Cannabinoids are chemical compounds (...) found in cannabis that can affect your mind and body when consumed. THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, is a cannabinoid that makes an individual high, euphoric and intoxicated. CBD (cannabidiol) is a non-intoxicating cannabinoid that might have some therapeutic benefit, but more research is needed to confirm its potential medical use. Edible cannabis comes in a wide range of products. 1 Although some edible cannabis products might look like normal food items, they are not food; these products

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

12. 7 Things You Need to Know about Edible Cannabis

7 Things You Need to Know about Edible Cannabis www.ccsa.ca • www.ccdus.ca Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction • Centre canadien sur les dépendances et l’usage de substances Page 1 7 Things You Need to Know about Edible Cannabis What Is Edible Cannabis? Edible cannabis products (edibles for short) are products containing cannabinoids that you eat or drink. Cannabinoids are chemical compounds found in cannabis that can affect your mind and body when consumed. THC (tetrahydrocannabinol (...) ) is a cannabinoid that makes an individual euphoric and intoxicated (or high). CBD (cannabidiol) is a non-intoxicating cannabinoid that might have some therapeutic benefit, although more research is needed to confirm its potential medical use. There is a wide range of edible cannabis products. Although some edible cannabis products might look like normal food items, they are not food and are not intended to provide any nutritional value. Edible cannabis products provide an alternative method of cannabis

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

13. Association Between Self-reported Prenatal Cannabis Use and Maternal, Perinatal, and Neonatal Outcomes. (PubMed)

Association Between Self-reported Prenatal Cannabis Use and Maternal, Perinatal, and Neonatal Outcomes. Recent evidence suggests that cannabis use during pregnancy is increasing, although population-based data about perinatal outcomes following in utero exposure remain limited.To assess whether there are associations between self-reported prenatal cannabis use and adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes.Population-based retrospective cohort study covering live births and stillbirths among women (...) aged 15 years and older in Ontario, Canada, between April 2012 and December 2017.Self-reported cannabis exposure in pregnancy was ascertained through routine perinatal care.The primary outcome was preterm birth before 37 weeks' gestation. Indicators were defined for birth occurring at 34 to 36 6/7 weeks' gestation (late preterm), 32 to 33 6/7 weeks' gestation, 28 to 31 6/7 weeks' gestation, and less than 28 weeks' gestation (very preterm birth). Ten secondary outcomes were examined including small

2019 JAMA

14. Edibles, Extracts and Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products

Edibles, Extracts and Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products www.ccsa.ca • www.ccdus.ca Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction • Centre canadien sur les dépendances et l’usage de substances Page 1 Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products Edible Cannabis (or Edibles) Edible cannabis (or edibles for short) are products containing cannabinoids that you eat or drink. Cannabinoids are chemical compounds found in cannabis (...) that can affect your mind and body when consumed. THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, is a cannabinoid that makes an individual high, euphoric and intoxicated. CBD (cannabidiol) is a non-intoxicating cannabinoid that might have some therapeutic benefit, but more research is needed to confirm its potential medical use. Edible cannabis comes in a wide range of products. 1 Although some edible cannabis products might look like normal food items, they are not food; these products are not intended to provide any

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

15. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Regular Use and Cognitive Functioning

Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Regular Use and Cognitive Functioning Key Points • Regular use refers to weekly or more frequent cannabis use over a period of months to years. Regular cannabis use is associated with mild cognitive difficulties, which are typically not apparent following about one month of abstinence. Heavy (daily) and long-term cannabis use is related to more noticeable cognitive impairment. • Cannabis use beginning prior to the age of 16 or 17 is one of the strongest (...) predictors of cognitive impairment. However, it is unclear which comes first — whether cognitive impairment leads to early onset cannabis use or whether beginning cannabis use early in life causes a progressive decline in cognitive abilities. • Regular cannabis use is associated with altered brain structure and function. Once again, it is currently unclear whether chronic cannabis exposure directly leads to brain changes or whether differences in brain structure precede the onset of chronic cannabis use

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

16. Pharmacotherapy for the Treatment of Cannabis Use Disorder

Pharmacotherapy for the Treatment of Cannabis Use Disorder Management Briefs eBrief-no151 -- Pharmacotherapy for the Treatment of Cannabis Use Disorder Enter search terms Button to search HSRD ® Inside VA Budget and Performance Inside the News Room National Observances Special Events » » » » » Management Briefs eBrief-no151 -- Pharmacotherapy for the Treatment of Cannabis Use Disorder Health Services Research & Development Management eBrief no. 151 » Issue 151 April 2019 The report is a product (...) of the VA/HSR&D Evidence Synthesis Program. Pharmacotherapy for the Treatment of Cannabis Use Disorder: A Systematic Review Social, medical, and legal acceptance of cannabis has grown dramatically over the last 15 years, and cannabis use — for medical and recreational purposes — also has increased. From 2002 to 2012, the prevalence of daily cannabis use in the United States increased from 1.3 to 2.1%. Along with an increase in the acceptance and use of cannabis, the potency of cannabis available

2019 Veterans Affairs - R&D

17. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Regular Use and Cognitive Functioning

Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Regular Use and Cognitive Functioning Key Points • Regular use refers to weekly or more frequent cannabis use over a period of months to years. Regular cannabis use is associated with mild cognitive difficulties, which are typically not apparent following about one month of abstinence. Heavy (daily) and long-term cannabis use is related to more noticeable cognitive impairment. • Cannabis use beginning prior to the age of 16 or 17 is one of the strongest (...) predictors of cognitive impairment. However, it is unclear which comes first — whether cognitive impairment leads to early onset cannabis use or whether beginning cannabis use early in life causes a progressive decline in cognitive abilities. • Regular cannabis use is associated with altered brain structure and function. Once again, it is currently unclear whether chronic cannabis exposure directly leads to brain changes or whether differences in brain structure precede the onset of chronic cannabis use

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

18. Acute Illness Associated With Cannabis Use, by Route of Exposure: An Observational Study. (PubMed)

Acute Illness Associated With Cannabis Use, by Route of Exposure: An Observational Study. Little is known about the relative harms of edible and inhalable cannabis products.To describe and compare adult emergency department (ED) visits related to edible and inhaled cannabis exposure.Chart review of ED visits between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2016.A large urban academic hospital in Colorado.Adults with ED visits with a cannabis-related International Classification of Diseases, Ninth or 10th (...) Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM or ICD-10-CM), code.Patient demographic characteristics, route of exposure, dose, symptoms, length of stay, disposition, discharge diagnoses, and attribution of visit to cannabis.There were 9973 visits with an ICD-9-CM or ICD-10-CM code for cannabis use. Of these, 2567 (25.7%) visits were at least partially attributable to cannabis, and 238 of those (9.3%) were related to edible cannabis. Visits attributable to inhaled cannabis were more likely

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

19. An experimental randomized study on the analgesic effects of pharmaceutical-grade cannabis in chronic pain patients with fibromyalgia

An experimental randomized study on the analgesic effects of pharmaceutical-grade cannabis in chronic pain patients with fibromyalgia In this experimental randomized placebo-controlled 4-way crossover trial, we explored the analgesic effects of inhaled pharmaceutical-grade cannabis in 20 chronic pain patients with fibromyalgia. We tested 4 different cannabis varieties with exact knowledge on their [INCREMENT]-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) content: Bedrocan (22.4-mg THC, <1-mg (...) than placebo on spontaneous or electrical pain responses, although more subjects receiving Bediol displayed a 30% decrease in pain scores compared to placebo (90% vs 55% of patients, P = 0.01), with spontaneous pain scores correlating with the magnitude of drug high (ρ = -0.5, P < 0.001). Cannabis varieties containing THC caused a significant increase in pressure pain threshold relative to placebo (P < 0.01). Cannabidiol inhalation increased THC plasma concentrations but diminished THC-induced

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2019 EvidenceUpdates

20. Cannabis derivative may reduce seizures in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies, but adverse events increase

Cannabis derivative may reduce seizures in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies, but adverse events increase Seizures may be reduced in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies by a cannabis derivative Discover Portal Discover Portal Cannabis derivative may reduce seizures in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies, but adverse events increase Published on 26 June 2018 doi: In people with some types of severe, drug-resistant epilepsy, adding cannabidiol to their treatment may reduce seizure (...) an alternative. There has been widespread interest from the public and the media in the medical use of cannabis and its active components (called cannabinoids). The medicinal grade cannabinoid studied in the main trials of this review do not have hallucinogenic effects. Laboratory and animal studies have suggested that cannabinoids might reduce epileptic seizures, and they have shown promise in some studies in people with severe epilepsy. However, there has been concern about the quality of these studies

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre