Latest & greatest articles for bronchiolitis

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Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis is mainly caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The virus travels down to the bronchioles in the lungs causing them to become inflamed making it difficult to breath.

Almost every child will be infected with RSV by the time they reach two years. Adults can also contract the virus, typically during winter months.

In mild cases bronchiolitis will clear up without treatment. The virus that causes bronchiolitis travels through tiny droplets of liquid and can be passed through the air or contracted by touching infected surfaces.

Symptoms include: Sore throat, dry cough, blocked nose and aches and pains throughout the body.

Although there is no cure for chronic bronchiolitis research and clinical studies on bronchiolitis suggest that some lifestyle changes can ease symptoms: avoid smoking, eat a healthy diet and maintain regular exercise. In extreme cases steroids can be prescribed to help minimise inflammation.

Read more on medications used to treat bronchiolitis and the causes of the virus.

Top results for bronchiolitis

1. Bronchiolitis: Recommendations for diagnosis, monitoring and management of children one to 24 months of age

Bronchiolitis: Recommendations for diagnosis, monitoring and management of children one to 24 months of age Bronchiolitis is the most common reason for admission to hospital in the first year of life. There is tremendous variation in the clinical management of this condition across Canada and around the world, including significant use of unnecessary tests and ineffective therapies. This statement pertains to generally healthy children ≤24 months of age with bronchiolitis. The diagnosis (...) of bronchiolitis is based primarily on the history of illness and physical examination findings. Laboratory investigations are generally unhelpful. Bronchiolitis is a self-limiting disease, usually managed with supportive care at home. Groups at high risk for severe disease are described and guidelines for admission to hospital are presented. Evidence for the efficacy of various therapies is discussed and recommendations are made for management. Monitoring requirements and discharge readiness from hospital

2014 Canadian Paediatric Society

2. Bronchiolitis in children: diagnosis and management

Bronchiolitis in children: diagnosis and management Bronchiolitis in children: diagnosis and Bronchiolitis in children: diagnosis and management management NICE guideline Published: 1 June 2015 nice.org.uk/guidance/ng9 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration (...) be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Bronchiolitis in children: diagnosis and management (NG9) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 19Contents Contents Overview 4 Who

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

3. High-flow warm humidified oxygen versus standard low-flow nasal cannula oxygen for moderate bronchiolitis (HFWHO RCT): an open, phase 4, randomised controlled trial

High-flow warm humidified oxygen versus standard low-flow nasal cannula oxygen for moderate bronchiolitis (HFWHO RCT): an open, phase 4, randomised controlled trial PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2017 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

4. Saline in Acute Bronchiolitis RCT and Economic evaluation: hypertonic saline in acute bronchiolitis - randomised controlled trial and systematic review

Saline in Acute Bronchiolitis RCT and Economic evaluation: hypertonic saline in acute bronchiolitis - randomised controlled trial and systematic review Saline in Acute Bronchiolitis RCT and Economic evaluation: hypertonic saline in acute bronchiolitis - randomised controlled trial and systematic review Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose

2015 NIHR HTA programme

5. Randomised controlled trial: The therapeutic value of hypertonic saline in acute bronchiolitis remains unclear (Full text)

Randomised controlled trial: The therapeutic value of hypertonic saline in acute bronchiolitis remains unclear The therapeutic value of hypertonic saline in acute bronchiolitis remains unclear | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here The therapeutic value of hypertonic saline in acute bronchiolitis remains unclear Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Randomised controlled trial The therapeutic value of hypertonic saline in acute

2015 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration) PubMed

6. Nebulized hypertonic saline solution for acute bronchiolitis in infants. (Full text)

Nebulized hypertonic saline solution for acute bronchiolitis in infants. Airway edema and mucus plugging are the predominant pathological features in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis. Nebulized hypertonic saline solution may reduce these pathological changes and decrease airway obstruction.To assess the effects of nebulized hypertonic saline solution in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library (...) and study quality assessment. We pooled the data from individual trials using the Cochrane statistical package Review Manager (RevMan).We included four trials involving 254 infants with acute viral bronchiolitis (189 inpatients and 65 outpatients) in this review. Patients treated with nebulized 3% saline had a significantly shorter mean length of hospital stay compared to those treated with nebulized 0.9% saline (mean difference (MD) -0.94 days, 95% CI -1.48 to -0.40, P = 0.0006). The 3% saline group

2008 Cochrane PubMed

7. High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) for the initial respiratory management of acute viral bronchiolitis in young infants: a multicenter randomized controlled trial (TRAMONTANE study)

High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) for the initial respiratory management of acute viral bronchiolitis in young infants: a multicenter randomized controlled trial (TRAMONTANE study) PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2017 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

8. High-flow nasal cannula therapy for infants with bronchiolitis. (Full text)

High-flow nasal cannula therapy for infants with bronchiolitis. Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory tract illness, usually of viral aetiology, affecting infants younger than 24 months of age and is a frequent cause of hospitalisation. It causes airway inflammation, mucus production and mucous plugging, resulting in airway obstruction. Effective pharmacotherapy is lacking and bronchiolitis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality.Conventional treatment consists of supportive therapy (...) in either group required further respiratory support. Five ongoing trials were identified but no data were available in May 2013. We were not able to perform a meta-analysis.There is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of HFNC therapy for treating infants with bronchiolitis. The current evidence in this review is of low quality, from one small study with uncertainty about the estimates of effect and an unclear risk of performance and detection bias. The included study provides some

2014 Cochrane PubMed

9. Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis Evidence Maps - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4

2018 Trip Evidence Maps

11. Is Nebulized Hypertonic Saline Solution Effective for Acute Bronchiolitis?

Is Nebulized Hypertonic Saline Solution Effective for Acute Bronchiolitis? TAKE-HOME MESSAGE Hypertonic saline solution is possibly effective in decreasing hospital admission and length of stay for infants with bronchiolitis. Is Nebulized Hypertonic Saline Solution Effective for Acute Bronchiolitis? EBEM Commentators Jennifer H. Chao, MD Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Department of Emergency Medicine SUNY Downstate Medical Center Brooklyn, NY Richard Sinert, DO Division of Research (...) of stay and hospital admission with hypertonic saline solution, although theseresultsneedtobetempered by the presence of substantial heterogeneity across studies because of inconsistency in de?ningbronchiolitis.Bronchiolitisis a clinical syndrome as opposed to a speci?c pathologic process. In everyday practice, the clinical pre- sentation of bronchiolitis overlaps that of a simple upper respiratory infection with an asthma exacerba- tion. Zheng et al 1 concluded that nebulized hypertonic saline

2017 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

12. High-flow warm humidified oxygen versus standard low-flow nasal cannula oxygen for moderate bronchiolitis (HFWHO RCT): an open, phase 4, randomised controlled trial. (PubMed)

High-flow warm humidified oxygen versus standard low-flow nasal cannula oxygen for moderate bronchiolitis (HFWHO RCT): an open, phase 4, randomised controlled trial. Bronchiolitis is the most common lung infection in infants and treatment focuses on management of respiratory distress and hypoxia. High-flow warm humidified oxygen (HFWHO) is increasingly used, but has not been rigorously studied in randomised trials. We aimed to examine whether HFWHO provided enhanced respiratory support, thereby (...) shortening time to weaning off oxygen.In this open, phase 4, randomised controlled trial, we recruited children aged less than 24 months with moderate bronchiolitis attending the emergency department of the John Hunter Hospital or the medical unit of the John Hunter Children's Hospital in New South Wales, Australia. Patients were randomly allocated (1:1) via opaque sealed envelopes to HFWHO (maximum flow of 1 L/kg per min to a limit of 20 L/min using 1:1 air-oxygen ratio, resulting in a maximum FiO2 of 0

2017 Lancet

13. Nebulised hypertonic saline solution for acute bronchiolitis in infants. (PubMed)

Nebulised hypertonic saline solution for acute bronchiolitis in infants. Airway oedema (swelling) and mucus plugging are the principal pathological features in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis. Nebulised hypertonic saline solution (≥ 3%) may reduce these pathological changes and decrease airway obstruction. This is an update of a review first published in 2008, and previously updated in 2010 and 2013.To assess the effects of nebulised hypertonic (≥ 3%) saline solution in infants (...) hypertonic saline alone or in conjunction with bronchodilators as an active intervention and nebulised 0.9% saline, or standard treatment as a comparator in children under 24 months with acute bronchiolitis. The primary outcome for inpatient trials was length of hospital stay, and the primary outcome for outpatients or emergency department trials was rate of hospitalisation.Two review authors independently performed study selection, data extraction, and assessment of risk of bias in included studies. We

2017 Cochrane

14. Montelukast as an episodic modifier for acute viral bronchiolitis: a randomized trial. (PubMed)

Montelukast as an episodic modifier for acute viral bronchiolitis: a randomized trial. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of once-daily montelukast therapy on the clinical progress and the cytokine profile of patients with acute viral bronchiolitis. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial included 85 patients (mean age, 3.5 +/- 2.35 months), clinically diagnosed as first-episode acute bronchiolitis in addition to 10 healthy controls of matched age and sex. Patients were (...) patients with a positive family history of asthma or allergy. Moreover, cases receiving montelukast showed lower CSs all through the hospital stay that were significant in the first 24 hours (p < 0.05). Montelukast is probably of benefit as an episodic modifier in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis.

2010 Allergy and Asthma Proceedings

15. Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis Bronchiolitis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Bronchiolitis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: January 2019 Summary Leading cause of hospital admission in infants under 1 year of age. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause. Most cases are mild and self-limiting, and supportive care is the only indicated therapy. Cough may persist for weeks, after 10 to 14 days (...) of acute illness. Some patients may go on to develop recurrent wheeze. Definition Viral bronchiolitis is an acute viral infection of the lower respiratory tract. Although it can affect individuals of any age, the term is most often used to refer to infection in infancy. It is characterised by epithelial cell destruction, cellular oedema, and airway obstruction by inflammatory debris and mucus. The clinical manifestations include cough, wheeze, and laboured breathing. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV

2018 BMJ Best Practice

16. Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis is ineffective and may be harmful

Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis is ineffective and may be harmful Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis is ineffective and may be harmful Discover Portal Discover Portal Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis is ineffective and may be harmful Published on 10 May 2016 doi: Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis in children under two has no benefits and may be harmful, according to a systematic review published by the Cochrane Collaboration. The research looked (...) at three different types of chest physiotherapy. It found that none of the techniques helped children with bronchiolitis recover more quickly or led to any improvement in their condition. Some types of chest physiotherapy may make breathing and blood-oxygen levels worse. This review’s findings suggest that chest physiotherapy should not normally be used for children hospitalised with severe bronchiolitis. The findings support current NICE guidance which says that children (who don’t have another

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

17. A randomized trial of nebulized 3% hypertonic saline with salbutamol in the treatment of acute bronchiolitis in hospitalized infants. (Full text)

A randomized trial of nebulized 3% hypertonic saline with salbutamol in the treatment of acute bronchiolitis in hospitalized infants. Acute bronchiolitis is a common disorder of infants that often results in hospitalization. Apart from supportive care, no therapy has been shown to influence the course of the disease, except for a possible effect of nebulized hypertonic saline (HS). To determine whether this does have beneficial effects on length of stay in hospital or on severity scores, we (...) undertook a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial in a pediatric department of a Portuguese hospital.Previously healthy infants, younger than 12 months, hospitalized with mild-to-moderate acute viral bronchiolitis were randomized to receive either nebulized 3% (hypertonic, HS) or 0.9% (normal, NS) saline during their entire hospital stay. Primary endpoints were: length of hospital stay and severity scores on each day of hospitalization. Need for supplemental oxygen, further add-on medications

2015 Pediatric pulmonology PubMed

18. Effect of Nebulized Hypertonic Saline Treatment in Emergency Departments on the Hospitalization Rate for Acute Bronchiolitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Effect of Nebulized Hypertonic Saline Treatment in Emergency Departments on the Hospitalization Rate for Acute Bronchiolitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2018 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

19. High-flow oxygen therapy may have a role in treating infants with more severe bronchiolitis

High-flow oxygen therapy may have a role in treating infants with more severe bronchiolitis High-flow oxygen therapy may have a role in treating infants with more severe bronchiolitis Discover Portal Discover Portal High-flow oxygen therapy may have a role in treating infants with more severe bronchiolitis Published on 18 September 2018 doi: A randomised controlled trial of 1,472 infants with bronchiolitis found that more children improved when started on high-flow oxygen therapy than (...) as first-line treatment or as "rescue" treatment in infants with bronchiolitis. Further research including cost-effectiveness will be needed before advocating high-flow oxygen for all infants hospitalised with bronchiolitis. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? Bronchiolitis is inflammation of small airways in the lungs. It is most commonly caused by respiratory syncytial virus, and usually affects infants. The first symptoms are similar to a cold, then cough, wheeze and fever

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

20. Is nebulised salbutamol indicated in bronchiolitis?

Is nebulised salbutamol indicated in bronchiolitis? BestBets: Is nebulised salbutamol indicated in bronchiolitis? Is nebulised salbutamol indicated in bronchiolitis? Report By: Jayachandran Panickar - Consultant Respiratory Paediatrician Search checked by Michael Eisenhut - Consultant Paediatrician Institution: Central Manchester and Manchester Children's University Hospital Original institution: Luton and Dunstable Hospital Date Submitted: 18th December 2002 Date Completed: 14th January 2009 (...) Last Modified: 14th January 2009 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [infants with bronchiolitis] will a [treatment with nebulised salbutamol] reduce [the length of hospitalisation and clinical severity]. Clinical Scenario A 6 month old baby is admitted to hospital with a 4 day history of coryzal symptoms, cough, wheeze and poor feeding. Your clinical diagnosis is bronchiolitis. You wonder whether treatment with nebulised salbutamol would improve the clinical condition. Search Strategy

2009 BestBETS