Latest & greatest articles for bronchiolitis

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Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis is mainly caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The virus travels down to the bronchioles in the lungs causing them to become inflamed making it difficult to breath.

Almost every child will be infected with RSV by the time they reach two years. Adults can also contract the virus, typically during winter months.

In mild cases bronchiolitis will clear up without treatment. The virus that causes bronchiolitis travels through tiny droplets of liquid and can be passed through the air or contracted by touching infected surfaces.

Symptoms include: Sore throat, dry cough, blocked nose and aches and pains throughout the body.

Although there is no cure for chronic bronchiolitis research and clinical studies on bronchiolitis suggest that some lifestyle changes can ease symptoms: avoid smoking, eat a healthy diet and maintain regular exercise. In extreme cases steroids can be prescribed to help minimise inflammation.

Read more on medications used to treat bronchiolitis and the causes of the virus.

Top results for bronchiolitis

61. Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis in paediatric patients between 0 and 24 months old. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis in paediatric patients between 0 and 24 months old. This Cochrane review was first published in 2005 and updated in 2007, 2012 and now 2015. Acute bronchiolitis is the leading cause of medical emergencies during winter in children younger than two years of age. Chest physiotherapy is sometimes used to assist infants in the clearance of secretions in order to decrease ventilatory effort.To determine the efficacy of chest physiotherapy in infants aged (...) less than 24 months old with acute bronchiolitis. A secondary objective was to determine the efficacy of different techniques of chest physiotherapy (for example, vibration and percussion and passive forced exhalation).We searched CENTRAL (2015, Issue 9) (accessed 8 July 2015), MEDLINE (1966 to July 2015), MEDLINE in-process and other non-indexed citations (July 2015), EMBASE (1990 to July 2015), CINAHL (1982 to July 2015), LILACS (1985 to July 2015), Web of Science (1985 to July 2015) and Pedro

2016 Cochrane

62. Viral Bronchiolitis in Children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Viral Bronchiolitis in Children. 26735994 2016 01 19 2016 05 05 1533-4406 374 1 2016 Jan 07 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Viral Bronchiolitis in Children. 62-72 10.1056/NEJMra1413456 Meissner H Cody HC eng Journal Article Review United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 0 Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2016 May 5;374(18):1792-3 27144868 N Engl J Med. 2016 May 5;374(18):1791-2 27144866 N Engl J Med. 2016 May 5;374(18):1791 27144865 N Engl J (...) Med. 2016 May 5;374(18):1792 27144867 N Engl J Med. 2016 May 5;374(18):1793-4 27144864 Asthma etiology Bronchiolitis, Viral complications immunology therapy virology Child, Preschool Humans Infant Respiratory Sounds etiology Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections immunology therapy Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines Risk Factors 2016 1 7 6 0 2016 1 7 6 0 2016 1 20 6 0 ppublish 26735994 10.1056/NEJMra1413456

2016 NEJM

63. Systematic review with meta analysis: Nebulised hypertonic saline may be less effective than previously reported in reducing hospital length of stay and admission rate in acute bronchiolitis

Systematic review with meta analysis: Nebulised hypertonic saline may be less effective than previously reported in reducing hospital length of stay and admission rate in acute bronchiolitis Nebulised hypertonic saline may be less effective than previously reported in reducing hospital length of stay and admission rate in acute bronchiolitis | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings (...) effective than previously reported in reducing hospital length of stay and admission rate in acute bronchiolitis Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Systematic review with meta analysis Nebulised hypertonic saline may be less effective than previously reported in reducing hospital length of stay and admission rate in acute bronchiolitis Kevin M Overmann 1 , Todd A Florin 1 , 2 Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on : Zhang L , Mendoza-Sassi RA , Klassen TP , et al . Nebulized hypertonic saline

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine

64. Interventions for bronchiolitis in the acute care setting: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

Interventions for bronchiolitis in the acute care setting: a systematic review and network meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web

2016 PROSPERO

65. Bronchiolitis of Infancy Discharge Study (BIDS): a multicentre, parallel-group, double-blind, randomised controlled, equivalence trial with economic evaluation

Bronchiolitis of Infancy Discharge Study (BIDS): a multicentre, parallel-group, double-blind, randomised controlled, equivalence trial with economic evaluation Bronchiolitis of Infancy Discharge Study (BIDS): a multicentre, parallel group, double-blind, randomised controlled, equivalence trial with economic evaluation Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found

2015 NIHR HTA programme

66. Saline in Acute Bronchiolitis RCT and Economic evaluation: hypertonic saline in acute bronchiolitis - randomised controlled trial and systematic review

Saline in Acute Bronchiolitis RCT and Economic evaluation: hypertonic saline in acute bronchiolitis - randomised controlled trial and systematic review Saline in Acute Bronchiolitis RCT and Economic evaluation: hypertonic saline in acute bronchiolitis - randomised controlled trial and systematic review Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose

2015 NIHR HTA programme

67. Heliox inhalation therapy for bronchiolitis in infants. (Abstract)

Heliox inhalation therapy for bronchiolitis in infants. Bronchiolitis is the leading cause of hospitalisation among infants in high-income countries. Acute viral bronchiolitis is associated with airway obstruction and turbulent gas flow. Heliox, a mixture of oxygen and the inert gas helium, may improve gas flow through high-resistance airways and decrease the work of breathing. In this review, we selected trials that objectively assessed the effect of the addition of heliox to standard medical (...) care for acute bronchiolitis.To assess heliox inhalation therapy in addition to standard medical care for acute bronchiolitis in infants with respiratory distress, as measured by clinical endpoints (in particular the rate of endotracheal intubation, the rate of emergency department discharge, the length of treatment for respiratory distress) and pulmonary function testing (mainly clinical respiratory scores).We searched CENTRAL (2015, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to March week 3, 2015), EMBASE (1974

2015 Cochrane

68. Surfactant therapy for bronchiolitis in critically ill infants. (Abstract)

Surfactant therapy for bronchiolitis in critically ill infants. Bronchiolitis is one of the most frequent causes of respiratory failure in infants; some infants will require intensive care and mechanical ventilation. There is lack of evidence regarding effective treatment for bronchiolitis other than supportive care. Abnormalities of surfactant quantity or quality (or both) have been observed in severe cases of bronchiolitis. Exogenous surfactant administration appears to favourably change (...) the haemodynamics of the lungs and may be a potentially promising therapy for severe bronchiolitis. This is an update of a review published in Issue 9, 2012. We did not identify any new studies for inclusion, and our conclusions remain unchanged.To evaluate the efficacy of exogenous surfactant administration (i.e. intratracheal administration of surfactant of any type (whether animal-derived or synthetic), at any dose and at any time after start of ventilation) compared to placebo, no intervention or standard

2015 Cochrane

69. Budesonide/Formoterol for bronchiolitis obliterans after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Abstract)

Budesonide/Formoterol for bronchiolitis obliterans after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation Systemic steroids are the standard treatment for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) despite their poor efficacy and disabling side effects.To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of budesonide/formoterol as an alternative treatment for BOS after HSCT.In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we randomly

2015 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

70. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for acute bronchiolitis in children. (Abstract)

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for acute bronchiolitis in children. Acute bronchiolitis is one of the most frequent causes of emergency department visits and hospitalisation in infants. There is no specific treatment for bronchiolitis except for supportive therapy. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is supposed to widen the peripheral airways of the lung, allowing deflation of over-distended lungs in bronchiolitis. The increase in airway pressure also prevents the collapse (...) including random sequence generation. The effect of CPAP on the need for mechanical ventilation in children with acute bronchiolitis was uncertain due to imprecision around the effect estimate (two RCTs, 50 participants; risk ratio (RR) 0.19, 95% CI 0.01 to 3.63; low quality evidence). Neither trial measured our other primary outcome of time to recovery. One trial found that CPAP significantly improved respiratory rate compared with no CPAP (one RCT, 19 participants; mean difference (MD) -5.70 breaths

2015 Cochrane

71. Effect of nebulised magnesium sulphate on length of hospital stay as compared to other treatment in bronchiolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Effect of nebulised magnesium sulphate on length of hospital stay as compared to other treatment in bronchiolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith

2015 PROSPERO

72. Bronchiolitis in children: diagnosis and management

Bronchiolitis in children: diagnosis and management Bronchiolitis in children: diagnosis and Bronchiolitis in children: diagnosis and management management NICE guideline Published: 1 June 2015 nice.org.uk/guidance/ng9 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration (...) be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Bronchiolitis in children: diagnosis and management (NG9) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 19Contents Contents Overview 4 Who

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

73. Randomised controlled trial: Nebulised hypertonic saline does not reduce hospital length of stay in acute bronchiolitis

Randomised controlled trial: Nebulised hypertonic saline does not reduce hospital length of stay in acute bronchiolitis Nebulised hypertonic saline does not reduce hospital length of stay in acute bronchiolitis | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Nebulised hypertonic saline does not reduce hospital length of stay in acute bronchiolitis Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Randomised controlled trial Nebulised hypertonic

2015 Evidence-Based Medicine

74. Randomised controlled trial: The therapeutic value of hypertonic saline in acute bronchiolitis remains unclear Full Text available with Trip Pro

Randomised controlled trial: The therapeutic value of hypertonic saline in acute bronchiolitis remains unclear The therapeutic value of hypertonic saline in acute bronchiolitis remains unclear | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here The therapeutic value of hypertonic saline in acute bronchiolitis remains unclear Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Randomised controlled trial The therapeutic value of hypertonic saline in acute

2015 Evidence-Based Medicine

75. Randomised controlled trial: Pulse oximetry may lead to unnecessary hospital admissions for infants with bronchiolitis and mild hypoxaemia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Randomised controlled trial: Pulse oximetry may lead to unnecessary hospital admissions for infants with bronchiolitis and mild hypoxaemia Pulse oximetry may lead to unnecessary hospital admissions for infants with bronchiolitis and mild hypoxaemia | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log (...) in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Pulse oximetry may lead to unnecessary hospital admissions for infants with bronchiolitis and mild hypoxaemia Article Text Therapeutics

2015 Evidence-Based Medicine

76. Bronchiolitis: Recommendations for diagnosis, monitoring and management of children one to 24 months of age

Bronchiolitis: Recommendations for diagnosis, monitoring and management of children one to 24 months of age Bronchiolitis is the most common reason for admission to hospital in the first year of life. There is tremendous variation in the clinical management of this condition across Canada and around the world, including significant use of unnecessary tests and ineffective therapies. This statement pertains to generally healthy children ≤24 months of age with bronchiolitis. The diagnosis (...) of bronchiolitis is based primarily on the history of illness and physical examination findings. Laboratory investigations are generally unhelpful. Bronchiolitis is a self-limiting disease, usually managed with supportive care at home. Groups at high risk for severe disease are described and guidelines for admission to hospital are presented. Evidence for the efficacy of various therapies is discussed and recommendations are made for management. Monitoring requirements and discharge readiness from hospital

2014 Canadian Paediatric Society

77. Hyponatremia in Children with Bronchiolitis Admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Is Associated with Worse Outcomes

Hyponatremia in Children with Bronchiolitis Admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Is Associated with Worse Outcomes PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2014 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

78. High flow therapy versus hypertonic saline in bronchiolitis: randomised controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

High flow therapy versus hypertonic saline in bronchiolitis: randomised controlled trial To demonstrate that heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC) is superior to inhaled hypertonic saline solution (HSS) in improving respiratory distress in moderate bronchiolitis. In addition, it could improve comfort and reduce length of hospital stay (LOS) and admission to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU).Randomised Clinical Trial from 1 October 2010 to 31 December 2012.Two urban secondary (...) (no PICU available) paediatric hospitalisation units.Hospitalised children aged up to 6 months with moderate acute bronchiolitis (Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument, RDAI ≥4).Patients were randomised to HHHFNC or HSS. All of them received epinephrine as bronchodilator.Primary outcome was difference in mean Respiratory Assessment Change Score (RACS) between both groups measured in six previously defined consecutive moments. Secondary outcomes were difference in mean comfort scores in this period

2014 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

79. High-flow nasal cannula therapy for infants with bronchiolitis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

High-flow nasal cannula therapy for infants with bronchiolitis. Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory tract illness, usually of viral aetiology, affecting infants younger than 24 months of age and is a frequent cause of hospitalisation. It causes airway inflammation, mucus production and mucous plugging, resulting in airway obstruction. Effective pharmacotherapy is lacking and bronchiolitis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality.Conventional treatment consists of supportive therapy (...) in either group required further respiratory support. Five ongoing trials were identified but no data were available in May 2013. We were not able to perform a meta-analysis.There is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of HFNC therapy for treating infants with bronchiolitis. The current evidence in this review is of low quality, from one small study with uncertainty about the estimates of effect and an unclear risk of performance and detection bias. The included study provides some

2014 Cochrane

80. Clinical Practice Guideline: The Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Bronchiolitis

Clinical Practice Guideline: The Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Bronchiolitis Clinical Practice Guideline: The Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Bronchiolitis | From the American Academy of Pediatrics | Pediatrics '); document.write(''); } function OAS_AD(pos) { if (OAS_version >= 11 && typeof(OAS_RICH)!='undefined') { OAS_RICH(pos); } else { OAS_NORMAL(pos); } } //--> Search for this keyword Source User menu Sections Sign up for highlighting editor-chosen studies (...) with the greatest impact on clinical care. Clinical Practice Guideline: The Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Bronchiolitis Shawn L. Ralston , Allan S. Lieberthal , H. Cody Meissner , Brian K. Alverson , Jill E. Baley , Anne M. Gadomski , David W. Johnson , Michael J. Light , Nizar F. Maraqa , Eneida A. Mendonca , Kieran J. Phelan , Joseph J. Zorc , Danette Stanko-Lopp , Mark A. Brown , Ian Nathanson , Elizabeth Rosenblum , Stephen Sayles III , Sinsi Hernandez-Cancio This article has a correction. Please

2014 American Academy of Pediatrics