Latest & greatest articles for bronchiolitis

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on bronchiolitis or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on bronchiolitis and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis is mainly caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The virus travels down to the bronchioles in the lungs causing them to become inflamed making it difficult to breath.

Almost every child will be infected with RSV by the time they reach two years. Adults can also contract the virus, typically during winter months.

In mild cases bronchiolitis will clear up without treatment. The virus that causes bronchiolitis travels through tiny droplets of liquid and can be passed through the air or contracted by touching infected surfaces.

Symptoms include: Sore throat, dry cough, blocked nose and aches and pains throughout the body.

Although there is no cure for chronic bronchiolitis research and clinical studies on bronchiolitis suggest that some lifestyle changes can ease symptoms: avoid smoking, eat a healthy diet and maintain regular exercise. In extreme cases steroids can be prescribed to help minimise inflammation.

Read more on medications used to treat bronchiolitis and the causes of the virus.

Top results for bronchiolitis

41. Hyponatremia in Children with Bronchiolitis Admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Is Associated with Worse Outcomes

Hyponatremia in Children with Bronchiolitis Admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Is Associated with Worse Outcomes PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club2014

42. Bronchiolitis: Recommendations for diagnosis, monitoring and management of children one to 24 months of age

Bronchiolitis: Recommendations for diagnosis, monitoring and management of children one to 24 months of age Bronchiolitis: Recommendations for diagnosis, monitoring and management of children one to 24 months | Position statements and practice points | Bronchiolitis: Recommendations for diagnosis, monitoring and management of children one to 24 months | Canadian Paediatric Society Protecting and promoting the health and well-being of children and youth CPS Member Login | Who We Are What We Do (...) Get Involved Education/CPD Publications Careers > Share POSITION STATEMENT Bronchiolitis: Recommendations for diagnosis, monitoring and management of children one to 24 months of age Posted: Nov 3 2014 Reaffirmed: Jan 30 2017 The Canadian Paediatric Society gives permission to print single copies of this document from our website. For permission to reprint or reproduce multiple copies, please see our . Principal author(s) Jeremy N Friedman, Michael J Rieder, Jennifer M Walton; Canadian Paediatric

Canadian Paediatric Society2014

43. High flow therapy versus hypertonic saline in bronchiolitis: randomised controlled trial

High flow therapy versus hypertonic saline in bronchiolitis: randomised controlled trial 24521787 2014 05 19 2014 07 08 2014 05 19 1468-2044 99 6 2014 Jun Archives of disease in childhood Arch. Dis. Child. High flow therapy versus hypertonic saline in bronchiolitis: randomised controlled trial. 511-5 10.1136/archdischild-2013-305443 To demonstrate that heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC) is superior to inhaled hypertonic saline solution (HSS) in improving respiratory distress (...) in moderate bronchiolitis. In addition, it could improve comfort and reduce length of hospital stay (LOS) and admission to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Randomised Clinical Trial from 1 October 2010 to 31 December 2012. Two urban secondary (no PICU available) paediatric hospitalisation units. Hospitalised children aged up to 6 months with moderate acute bronchiolitis (Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument, RDAI ≥4). Patients were randomised to HHHFNC or HSS. All of them received epinephrine

EvidenceUpdates2014 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

44. High-flow nasal cannula therapy for infants with bronchiolitis.

High-flow nasal cannula therapy for infants with bronchiolitis. BACKGROUND: Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory tract illness, usually of viral aetiology, affecting infants younger than 24 months of age and is a frequent cause of hospitalisation. It causes airway inflammation, mucus production and mucous plugging, resulting in airway obstruction. Effective pharmacotherapy is lacking and bronchiolitis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality.Conventional treatment consists (...) . This may reduce the need for invasive respiratory support thus potentially lowering costs, with clinical advantages and fewer adverse effects. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of HFNC therapy compared with conventional respiratory support in the treatment of infants with bronchiolitis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL (2013, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1946 to May week 1, 2013), EMBASE (January 2010 to May 2013), CINAHL (1981 to May 2013), LILACS (1982 to May 2013) and Web of Science (1985 to May 2013

Cochrane2014

45. Effect of oximetry on hospitalization in bronchiolitis: a randomized clinical trial.

Effect of oximetry on hospitalization in bronchiolitis: a randomized clinical trial. 25138332 2014 08 20 2014 08 25 2016 10 17 1538-3598 312 7 2014 Aug 20 JAMA JAMA Effect of oximetry on hospitalization in bronchiolitis: a randomized clinical trial. 712-8 10.1001/jama.2014.8637 Routine use of pulse oximetry has been associated with changes in bronchiolitis management and may have lowered the hospitalization threshold for patients with bronchiolitis. To examine if infants with bronchiolitis (...) whose displayed oximetry measurements have been artificially elevated 3 percentage points above true values experience hospitalization rates at least 15% lower compared with infants with true values displayed. Randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial conducted from 2008 to 2013 in a tertiary-care pediatric emergency department in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Participants were 213 otherwise healthy infants aged 4 weeks to 12 months with mild to moderate bronchiolitis and true oxygen saturations

JAMA2014 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

46. Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis Bronchiolitis - Clinical Practice Guideline -- Clinical Recommendation Welcome Search Search Specify your search AAFP.org Patient Care Clinical Practice Guideline Bronchiolitis Diagnosis and Management of Bronchiolitis (Endorsed, December 2014) The guideline, Diagnosis and Management of Bronchiolitis , was developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and endorsed by the American Academy of Family Physicians. Key Recommendations The diagnosis of bronchiolitis and assessment (...) of disease severity should be based on history and physical examination. Laboratory and radiologic studies should not be routinely ordered for diagnosis. Risk factors for severe disease such as age < 12 weeks, premature birth, underlying cardiopulmonary disease, or immunodeficiency should be assessed when making decisions about evaluation and management of children with bronchiolitis. Bronchodilators (albuterol, salbutamol), epinephrine, and corticosteroids should not be administered to infants

American Academy of Family Physicians2014

47. Clinical Practice Guideline: The Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Bronchiolitis

Clinical Practice Guideline: The Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Bronchiolitis Clinical Practice Guideline: The Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Bronchiolitis | From the American Academy of Pediatrics | Pediatrics '); document.write(''); } function OAS_AD(pos) { if (OAS_version >= 11 && typeof(OAS_RICH)!='undefined') { OAS_RICH(pos); } else { OAS_NORMAL(pos); } } //--> Search for this keyword Source User menu Sections Sign up for highlighting editor-chosen studies (...) with the greatest impact on clinical care. Know what's next when you read AAP Journals, . Trainees, enter the for a chance to be published in Pediatrics ! October 2014 From the American Academy of Pediatrics Clinical Practice Guideline Clinical Practice Guideline: The Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Bronchiolitis Shawn L. Ralston , Allan S. Lieberthal , H. Cody Meissner , Brian K. Alverson , Jill E. Baley , Anne M. Gadomski , David W. Johnson , Michael J. Light , Nizar F. Maraqa , Eneida A. Mendonca

American Academy of Pediatrics2014

48. Diagnosis and Management of Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome: An Official ATS/ERS/ISHLT Clinical Practice Guideline

Diagnosis and Management of Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome: An Official ATS/ERS/ISHLT Clinical Practice Guideline An international ISHLT/ATS/ERS clinical practice guideline: diagnosis and management of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome Keith C. Meyer 1 , Ganesh Raghu 2 , Geert M. Verleden 3 , Paul A. Corris 4 , Paul Aurora 5 , Kevin C. Wilson 6 , Jan Brozek 7 , Allan R. Glanville 8 and the ISHLT/ATS/ERS BOS Task Force Committee 9 Affiliations: 1 School of Medicine and Public Health (...) and their affiliations can be found in the Acknowledgements section. Correspondence: Keith C. Meyer, University of Wisconsin Lung Transplant and Advanced Pulmonary Disease Program, Section of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA. E-mail: kcm@medicine.wisc.edu ABSTRACT Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) is a major complication of lung transplantation that is associated with poor survival. The International Society for Heart and Lung

American Thoracic Society2014

49. An international ISHLT/ATS/ERS clinical practice guideline: diagnosis and management of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome

An international ISHLT/ATS/ERS clinical practice guideline: diagnosis and management of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome An international ISHLT/ATS/ERS clinical practice guideline: diagnosis and management of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome | European Respiratory Society Main menu User menu Search Search for this keyword Search for this keyword An international ISHLT/ATS/ERS clinical practice guideline: diagnosis and management of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome Keith C. Meyer , Ganesh (...) Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children , London , UK Kevin C. Wilson Boston University Medical Center , Boston, MA , USA Jan Brozek McMaster University , Hamilton, ON , Canada Allan R. Glanville The Lung Transplant Unit, St Vincents Hospital , Sydney , Australia A full list of the ISHLT/ATS/ERS BOS Task Force Committee members and their affiliations can be found in the Acknowledgements section Abstract Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) is a major complication of lung transplantation that is

International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation2014

50. Nebulized hypertonic saline treatment for infants with bronchiolitis

Nebulized hypertonic saline treatment for infants with bronchiolitis Nebulized hypertonic saline treatment for infants with bronchiolitis Nebulized hypertonic saline treatment for infants with bronchiolitis Mitchell MD, Schast AP, Umscheid CA Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Mitchell MD, Schast AP, Umscheid CA. Nebulized hypertonic saline (...) treatment for infants with bronchiolitis. Philadelphia: Center for Evidence-based Practice (CEP). 2013 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Administration, Inhalation; Bronchiolitiss; Infant; Nebulizers and Vaporizers; Saline Solution, Hypertonic Language Published English Country of organisation United States English summary An English language summary is available. Address for correspondence Center for Evidence-based Practice, University of Pennsylvania Health

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2013

51. Oxygen saturation discharge thresholds for infants admitted with bronchiolitis

Oxygen saturation discharge thresholds for infants admitted with bronchiolitis Oxygen saturation discharge thresholds for infants admitted with bronchiolitis Oxygen saturation discharge thresholds for infants admitted with bronchiolitis Mitchell MD, Schast AP, Umscheid CA Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Mitchell MD, Schast AP, Umscheid CA. Oxygen (...) saturation discharge thresholds for infants admitted with bronchiolitis. Philadelphia: Center for Evidence-based Practice (CEP). 2013 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Bronchiolitiss; Infant; Oximetry; Oxygen Language Published English Country of organisation United States English summary An English language summary is available. Address for correspondence Center for Evidence-based Practice, University of Pennsylvania Health System, 3535 Market St. Suite 50

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2013

52. Nutrition during hospitalization for pediatric bronchiolitis

Nutrition during hospitalization for pediatric bronchiolitis Nutrition during hospitalization for pediatric bronchiolitis Nutrition during hospitalization for pediatric bronchiolitis Lavenberg JG, Umscheid CA Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Lavenberg JG, Umscheid CA. Nutrition during hospitalization for pediatric bronchiolitis. Philadelphia

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2013

53. Racemic adrenaline and inhalation strategies in acute bronchiolitis.

Racemic adrenaline and inhalation strategies in acute bronchiolitis. BACKGROUND: Acute bronchiolitis in infants frequently results in hospitalization, but there is no established consensus on inhalation therapy--either the type of medication or the frequency of administration--that may be of value. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of inhaled racemic adrenaline as compared with inhaled saline and the strategy for frequency of inhalation (on demand vs. fixed schedule) in infants hospitalized (...) with acute bronchiolitis. METHODS: In this eight-center, randomized, double-blind trial with a 2-by-2 factorial design, we compared inhaled racemic adrenaline with inhaled saline and on-demand inhalation with fixed-schedule inhalation (up to every 2 hours) in infants (<12 months of age) with moderate-to-severe acute bronchiolitis. An overall clinical score of 4 or higher (on a scale of 0 to 10, with higher scores indicating more severe illness) was required for study inclusion. Any use of oxygen

NEJM2013

54. Increase in use of non-invasive ventilation for infants with severe bronchiolitis is associated with decline in intubation rates over a decade

Increase in use of non-invasive ventilation for infants with severe bronchiolitis is associated with decline in intubation rates over a decade PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club2013

55. Racemic adrenaline and inhalation strategies in acute bronchiolitis.

Racemic adrenaline and inhalation strategies in acute bronchiolitis. 23758233 2013 06 13 2013 06 18 2015 11 19 1533-4406 368 24 2013 Jun 13 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Racemic adrenaline and inhalation strategies in acute bronchiolitis. 2286-93 10.1056/NEJMoa1301839 Acute bronchiolitis in infants frequently results in hospitalization, but there is no established consensus on inhalation therapy--either the type of medication or the frequency of administration--that may (...) be of value. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of inhaled racemic adrenaline as compared with inhaled saline and the strategy for frequency of inhalation (on demand vs. fixed schedule) in infants hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis. In this eight-center, randomized, double-blind trial with a 2-by-2 factorial design, we compared inhaled racemic adrenaline with inhaled saline and on-demand inhalation with fixed-schedule inhalation (up to every 2 hours) in infants (<12 months of age) with moderate

NEJM2013

56. Antibiotics for persistent cough or wheeze following acute bronchiolitis in children.

Antibiotics for persistent cough or wheeze following acute bronchiolitis in children. BACKGROUND: Bronchiolitis is a common acute respiratory infectious condition, with a high prevalence worldwide. It is a clinically diagnosed syndrome, manifested by tachypnoea (rapid breathing), with crackles or wheeze in young children. In the acute phase of bronchiolitis (< 14 days), antibiotics have only been recommended when a secondary bacterial infection is suspected. Although bronchiolitis is usually (...) a self-limiting condition, a number of children have persistent respiratory symptoms such as cough and wheezing in post-acute bronchiolitis, and they present or re-present to secondary care. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness of antibiotics compared to a control (no treatment or placebo) for persistent respiratory symptoms (within six months), following acute bronchiolitis. SEARCH METHODS: The following databases were searched, The Cochrane Airways Group Register of Trials, Cochrane Central

Cochrane2012

57. Azithromycin Therapy in Hospitalized Infants with Acute Bronchiolitis is Not Associated with Better Clinical Outcomes: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, and Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

Azithromycin Therapy in Hospitalized Infants with Acute Bronchiolitis is Not Associated with Better Clinical Outcomes: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, and Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial 22748516 2012 11 22 2013 01 22 2012 11 22 1097-6833 161 6 2012 Dec The Journal of pediatrics J. Pediatr. Azithromycin therapy in hospitalized infants with acute bronchiolitis is not associated with better clinical outcomes: a randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled clinical trial. 1104-8 10.1016 (...) /j.jpeds.2012.05.053 S0022-3476(12)00611-7 To test the hypothesis that azithromycin reduces the length of hospitalization and oxygen requirement in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis (AB). We performed a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in southern Brazil, from 2009 to 2011. Infants (<12 months of age) hospitalized with AB were recruited in 2 hospitals. Patients were randomized to receive either azithromycin or placebo, administered orally, for 7 days. At enrollment, clinical

EvidenceUpdates2012

58. Hospitalisation for bronchiolitis in infants is more common after elective caesarean delivery

Hospitalisation for bronchiolitis in infants is more common after elective caesarean delivery 22039179 2012 04 24 2012 07 17 2012 10 02 1468-2044 97 5 2012 May Archives of disease in childhood Arch. Dis. Child. Hospitalisation for bronchiolitis in infants is more common after elective caesarean delivery. 410-4 10.1136/archdischild-2011-300607 The authors previously reported an increased risk of hospitalisation for acute lower respiratory infection up to age 2 years in children delivered (...) by elective caesarean section. In view of increasing rates of elective caesarean delivery, this association warranted further investigation. To examine associations between the number of hospital admissions for bronchiolitis and pneumonia and elective caesarean delivery. Retrospective population-based data linkage cohort study of 212 068 non-Aboriginal singleton births of 37-42 weeks gestation. Negative binomial regression was used to examine associations between mode of delivery and hospitalisations

EvidenceUpdates2012

59. Helium-oxygen therapy for infants with bronchiolitis: a randomized controlled trial

Helium-oxygen therapy for infants with bronchiolitis: a randomized controlled trial PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club2012