Latest & greatest articles for bronchiolitis

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Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis is mainly caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The virus travels down to the bronchioles in the lungs causing them to become inflamed making it difficult to breath.

Almost every child will be infected with RSV by the time they reach two years. Adults can also contract the virus, typically during winter months.

In mild cases bronchiolitis will clear up without treatment. The virus that causes bronchiolitis travels through tiny droplets of liquid and can be passed through the air or contracted by touching infected surfaces.

Symptoms include: Sore throat, dry cough, blocked nose and aches and pains throughout the body.

Although there is no cure for chronic bronchiolitis research and clinical studies on bronchiolitis suggest that some lifestyle changes can ease symptoms: avoid smoking, eat a healthy diet and maintain regular exercise. In extreme cases steroids can be prescribed to help minimise inflammation.

Read more on medications used to treat bronchiolitis and the causes of the virus.

Top results for bronchiolitis

21. A Randomized Trial of High-Flow Oxygen Therapy in Infants with Bronchiolitis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

A Randomized Trial of High-Flow Oxygen Therapy in Infants with Bronchiolitis. High-flow oxygen therapy through a nasal cannula has been increasingly used in infants with bronchiolitis, despite limited high-quality evidence of its efficacy. The efficacy of high-flow oxygen therapy through a nasal cannula in settings other than intensive care units (ICUs) is unclear.In this multicenter, randomized, controlled trial, we assigned infants younger than 12 months of age who had bronchiolitis (...) differences were observed in the duration of hospital stay or the duration of oxygen therapy. In each group, one case of pneumothorax (<1% of infants) occurred. Among the 167 infants in the standard-therapy group who had treatment failure, 102 (61%) had a response to high-flow rescue therapy.Among infants with bronchiolitis who were treated outside an ICU, those who received high-flow oxygen therapy had significantly lower rates of escalation of care due to treatment failure than those in the group

2018 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

22. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure vs high-flow nasal cannula in moderate and severe bronchiolitis: a systematic review

Nasal continuous positive airway pressure vs high-flow nasal cannula in moderate and severe bronchiolitis: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne

2018 PROSPERO

23. High-?ow nasal cannula therapy for children with bronchiolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

High-?ow nasal cannula therapy for children with bronchiolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web

2018 PROSPERO

24. Macrolides for children with bronchiolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Macrolides for children with bronchiolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing

2018 PROSPERO

25. Association between early bronchiolitis and the subsequent development of asthma: a meta-analysis

Association between early bronchiolitis and the subsequent development of asthma: a meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address

2018 PROSPERO

26. Magnesium sulphate for acute bronchiolitis in children under two years of age [Cochrane protocol]

Magnesium sulphate for acute bronchiolitis in children under two years of age [Cochrane protocol] Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address

2018 PROSPERO

27. High-flow nasal cannula vs. nasal continuous positive airway pressure or nasal conventional oxygen therapy in infants and children with moderate-to-severe bronchiolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

High-flow nasal cannula vs. nasal continuous positive airway pressure or nasal conventional oxygen therapy in infants and children with moderate-to-severe bronchiolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2018 PROSPERO

28. Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis Bronchiolitis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Bronchiolitis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: January 2019 Summary Leading cause of hospital admission in infants under 1 year of age. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause. Most cases are mild and self-limiting, and supportive care is the only indicated therapy. Cough may persist for weeks, after 10 to 14 days (...) of acute illness. Some patients may go on to develop recurrent wheeze. Definition Viral bronchiolitis is an acute viral infection of the lower respiratory tract. Although it can affect individuals of any age, the term is most often used to refer to infection in infancy. It is characterised by epithelial cell destruction, cellular oedema, and airway obstruction by inflammatory debris and mucus. The clinical manifestations include cough, wheeze, and laboured breathing. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV

2018 BMJ Best Practice

29. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia

Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: January 2018 Summary An inflammatory disorder involving both the peripheral bronchioles and alveoli simultaneously. It has distinctive radiographic findings, histological features (...) opacities with air bronchograms usually located peripherally. Lung biopsy may be required to establish the definitive diagnosis in patients with unusual findings or severe disease. Idiopathic BOOP is treated with corticosteroids. Cases with an underlying cause (e.g., drug-related BOOP) should have the causative factor removed; corticosteroid therapy is indicated in some cases. Definition Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia (BOOP) is defined as organised polypoid granulation tissue

2018 BMJ Best Practice

30. The effect of CPAP on children with bronchiolitis compared with different oxygen therapies : a systematic review and meta-analysis

The effect of CPAP on children with bronchiolitis compared with different oxygen therapies : a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne

2018 PROSPERO

31. Bacterial co-detection and outcomes in infants with viral bronchiolitis who require invasive mechanical ventilation

Bacterial co-detection and outcomes in infants with viral bronchiolitis who require invasive mechanical ventilation Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence

2018 PROSPERO

32. The impact of diagnostic criteria on reported UTI prevalence in neonatal jaundice and bronchiolitis: systematic review and meta-analysis

The impact of diagnostic criteria on reported UTI prevalence in neonatal jaundice and bronchiolitis: systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne

2018 PROSPERO

33. High flow versus low flow oxygen for infants with bronchiolitis

High flow versus low flow oxygen for infants with bronchiolitis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures

2018 PROSPERO

34. Epidemiology of viral infections in children with acute bronchiolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Epidemiology of viral infections in children with acute bronchiolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation

2018 PROSPERO

35. Association between Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) and severity in bronchiolitis caused by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV): systematic review and meta-analysis

Association between Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) and severity in bronchiolitis caused by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV): systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr

2018 PROSPERO

36. Association between Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) and severity in bronchiolitis caused by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV): systematic review and meta-analysis

Association between Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) and severity in bronchiolitis caused by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV): systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr

2018 PROSPERO

38. Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis Printed copies of this document may not be up to date, obtain the most recent version from www.cats.nhs.uk Children’s Acute Transport Service Clinical Guidelines Bronchiolitis Document Control Information Authors P Ramnarayan Author Position Consultant Document Owner Eithne Polke Document Owner Position Service Coordinator Document Version Version 3 Replaces Version January 2016 First Introduced Review Schedule 2 Yearly Active Date January 2018 Next Review January 2020 CATS

2018 Children's Acute Transport Service

39. Nebulised hypertonic saline solution for acute bronchiolitis in infants. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Nebulised hypertonic saline solution for acute bronchiolitis in infants. Airway oedema (swelling) and mucus plugging are the principal pathological features in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis. Nebulised hypertonic saline solution (≥ 3%) may reduce these pathological changes and decrease airway obstruction. This is an update of a review first published in 2008, and previously updated in 2010 and 2013.To assess the effects of nebulised hypertonic (≥ 3%) saline solution in infants (...) hypertonic saline alone or in conjunction with bronchodilators as an active intervention and nebulised 0.9% saline, or standard treatment as a comparator in children under 24 months with acute bronchiolitis. The primary outcome for inpatient trials was length of hospital stay, and the primary outcome for outpatients or emergency department trials was rate of hospitalisation.Two review authors independently performed study selection, data extraction, and assessment of risk of bias in included studies. We

2017 Cochrane

40. International Variation in Asthma and Bronchiolitis Guidelines Full Text available with Trip Pro

International Variation in Asthma and Bronchiolitis Guidelines Guideline recommendations for the same clinical condition may vary. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of agreement among comparable asthma and bronchiolitis treatment recommendations from guidelines.National and international guidelines were searched by using guideline databases (eg, National Guidelines Clearinghouse: December 16-17, 2014, and January 9, 2015). Guideline recommendations were categorized as (1 (...) ) recommend, (2) optionally recommend, (3) abstain from recommending, (4) recommend against a treatment, and (5) not addressed by the guideline. The degree of agreement between recommendations was evaluated by using an unweighted and weighted κ score. Pairwise comparisons of the guidelines were evaluated similarly.There were 7 guidelines for asthma and 4 guidelines for bronchiolitis. For asthma, there were 166 recommendation topics, with 69 recommendation topics given in ≥2 guidelines. For bronchiolitis

2017 EvidenceUpdates