Latest & greatest articles for bronchiolitis

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Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis is mainly caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The virus travels down to the bronchioles in the lungs causing them to become inflamed making it difficult to breath.

Almost every child will be infected with RSV by the time they reach two years. Adults can also contract the virus, typically during winter months.

In mild cases bronchiolitis will clear up without treatment. The virus that causes bronchiolitis travels through tiny droplets of liquid and can be passed through the air or contracted by touching infected surfaces.

Symptoms include: Sore throat, dry cough, blocked nose and aches and pains throughout the body.

Although there is no cure for chronic bronchiolitis research and clinical studies on bronchiolitis suggest that some lifestyle changes can ease symptoms: avoid smoking, eat a healthy diet and maintain regular exercise. In extreme cases steroids can be prescribed to help minimise inflammation.

Read more on medications used to treat bronchiolitis and the causes of the virus.

Top results for bronchiolitis

1. Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis is ineffective and may be harmful

Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis is ineffective and may be harmful Signal - Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis is ineffective and may be harmful Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis is ineffective and may be harmful Published on 10 May 2016 Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis in children under two has no benefits and may be harmful, according to a systematic review published by the Cochrane Collaboration (...) . The research looked at three different types of chest physiotherapy. It found that none of the techniques helped children with bronchiolitis recover more quickly or led to any improvement in their condition. Some types of chest physiotherapy may make breathing and blood-oxygen levels worse. This review’s findings suggest that chest physiotherapy should not normally be used for children hospitalised with severe bronchiolitis. The findings support current NICE guidance which says that children (who don’t

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

2. High-flow oxygen therapy may have a role in treating infants with more severe bronchiolitis

High-flow oxygen therapy may have a role in treating infants with more severe bronchiolitis High-flow oxygen therapy may have a role in treating infants with more severe bronchiolitis Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover High-flow oxygen therapy may have a role in treating infants with more severe bronchiolitis Published on 18 September 2018 doi: A randomised controlled trial of 1,472 infants with bronchiolitis found that more children improved when started on high-flow oxygen (...) is best used as first-line treatment or as "rescue" treatment in infants with bronchiolitis. Further research including cost-effectiveness will be needed before advocating high-flow oxygen for all infants hospitalised with bronchiolitis. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? Bronchiolitis is inflammation of small airways in the lungs. It is most commonly caused by respiratory syncytial virus, and usually affects infants. The first symptoms are similar to a cold, then cough

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

3. Less stringent target oxygen levels for acute bronchiolitis are safe and effective

Less stringent target oxygen levels for acute bronchiolitis are safe and effective Signal - Less stringent target oxygen levels for acute bronchiolitis are safe and effective Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Less stringent target oxygen levels for acute bronchiolitis are safe and effective Published on 1 December 2015 This NIHR-funded trial found that acute bronchiolitis in children can be safely managed to a slightly lower target level of oxygen saturation than currently (...) to country it is likely that this research may prompt a change in advice in due course. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? Bronchiolitis is a common respiratory tract infection affecting about 1 in 3 babies. About 2% to 3% of these babies develop severe breathing difficulties needing hospital treatment. The number of hospital admissions for bronchiolitis has been increasing over the last 10 years, from 21,330 admissions in England in 2004 to 30,451 in 2011. Children

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

4. Inhaling a saline mist did not reduce the time in hospital for babies with bronchiolitis

Inhaling a saline mist did not reduce the time in hospital for babies with bronchiolitis Signal - Inhaling a saline mist did not reduce the time in hospital for babies with bronchiolitis Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Inhaling a saline mist did not reduce the time in hospital for babies with bronchiolitis Published on 28 October 2015 In this NIHR-funded trial babies with a viral chest infection (acute bronchiolitis) were treated either with a strong saline mist (nebulised (...) guidelines that say hypertonic saline should not be used in these babies. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? Bronchiolitis is a common respiratory tract infection affecting about 1 in 3 babies. About 2% to 3% of these babies develop more severe symptoms, such as breathing difficulties, needing hospital treatment. The number of hospital admissions for bronchiolitis has been increasing over the last ten years, from 21,330 admissions in England in 2004 to 30,451 in 2011. A 2013

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

5. Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis Top results for bronchiolitis - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature My query is: English Français Deutsch Čeština Español Magyar Svenska ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing (...) the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for bronchiolitis The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines

Trip Latest and Greatest2018

6. Chronic Cough Related to Acute Viral Bronchiolitis in Children

Chronic Cough Related to Acute Viral Bronchiolitis in Children Chronic Cough Related to Acute Viral Bronchiolitis in Children CHEST Expert Panel Report Anne B. Chang, MBBS, PhD, MPH; John J. Oppenheimer, MD; Bruce K. Rubin, MD; Miles Weinberger, MD, FCCP; and Richard S. Irwin, MD, Master FCCP; on behalf of the CHEST Expert Cough Panel BACKGROUND: Acute bronchiolitis is common in young children, and some children develop chronic cough after their bronchiolitis. We thus undertook systematic (...) , no recommendations on using the interventions above could be formulated. CONCLUSIONS: The panel made several consensus-based suggestions and identi?ed directions for future studies to advance the ?eld of managing chronic cough post-acute bronchiolitis in children. CHEST 2018; 154(2):378-382 KEYWORDS: cough; evidence-based medicine; guidelines ABBREVIATIONS: KQ = key question; RCT = randomized controlled trial AFFILIATIONS: From the Division of Child Health (Dr Chang), MenziesSchoolofHealthResearch,Darwin

American College of Chest Physicians2018

7. Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis Autosynthesis - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature My query is: English Français Deutsch Čeština Español Magyar Svenska ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search

Trip Evidence Maps2018

8. Effect of Nebulized Hypertonic Saline Treatment in Emergency Departments on the Hospitalization Rate for Acute Bronchiolitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Effect of Nebulized Hypertonic Saline Treatment in Emergency Departments on the Hospitalization Rate for Acute Bronchiolitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club2018

9. Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis is ineffective and may be harmful

Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis is ineffective and may be harmful NIHR DC | Signal - Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis is ineffective and may be harmful Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis is ineffective and may be harmful Published on 10 May 2016 Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis in children under two has no benefits and may be harmful, according to a systematic review published (...) by the Cochrane Collaboration. The research looked at three different types of chest physiotherapy. It found that none of the techniques helped children with bronchiolitis recover more quickly or led to any improvement in their condition. Some types of chest physiotherapy may make breathing and blood-oxygen levels worse. This review’s findings suggest that chest physiotherapy should not normally be used for children hospitalised with severe bronchiolitis. The findings support current NICE guidance which says

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

10. Inhaling a saline mist did not reduce the time in hospital for babies with bronchiolitis

Inhaling a saline mist did not reduce the time in hospital for babies with bronchiolitis NIHR DC | Signal - Inhaling a saline mist did not reduce the time in hospital for babies with bronchiolitis Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Inhaling a saline mist did not reduce the time in hospital for babies with bronchiolitis Published on 28 October 2015 In this NIHR-funded trial babies with a viral chest infection (acute bronchiolitis) were treated either with a strong (...) are in line with 2015 NICE guidelines that say hypertonic saline should not be used in these babies. Why was this study needed? Bronchiolitis is a common respiratory tract infection affecting about 1 in 3 babies. About 2% to 3% of these babies develop more severe symptoms, such as breathing difficulties, needing hospital treatment. The number of hospital admissions for bronchiolitis has been increasing over the last ten years, from 21,330 admissions in England in 2004 to 30,451 in 2011. A 2013 Cochrane

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

11. Less stringent target oxygen levels for acute bronchiolitis are safe and effective

Less stringent target oxygen levels for acute bronchiolitis are safe and effective NIHR DC | Signal - Less stringent target oxygen levels for acute bronchiolitis are safe and effective Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Less stringent target oxygen levels for acute bronchiolitis are safe and effective Published on 1 December 2015 This NIHR-funded trial found that acute bronchiolitis in children can be safely managed to a slightly lower target level of oxygen (...) on the topic vary from country to country it is likely that this research may prompt a change in advice in due course. Why was this study needed? Bronchiolitis is a common respiratory tract infection affecting about 1 in 3 babies. About 2% to 3% of these babies develop severe breathing difficulties needing hospital treatment. The number of hospital admissions for bronchiolitis has been increasing over the last 10 years, from 21,330 admissions in England in 2004 to 30,451 in 2011. Children

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

12. A Randomized Trial of High-Flow Oxygen Therapy in Infants with Bronchiolitis.

A Randomized Trial of High-Flow Oxygen Therapy in Infants with Bronchiolitis. BACKGROUND: High-flow oxygen therapy through a nasal cannula has been increasingly used in infants with bronchiolitis, despite limited high-quality evidence of its efficacy. The efficacy of high-flow oxygen therapy through a nasal cannula in settings other than intensive care units (ICUs) is unclear. METHODS: In this multicenter, randomized, controlled trial, we assigned infants younger than 12 months of age who had (...) bronchiolitis and a need for supplemental oxygen therapy to receive either high-flow oxygen therapy (high-flow group) or standard oxygen therapy (standard-therapy group). Infants in the standard-therapy group could receive rescue high-flow oxygen therapy if their condition met criteria for treatment failure. The primary outcome was escalation of care due to treatment failure (defined as meeting ≥3 of 4 clinical criteria: persistent tachycardia, tachypnea, hypoxemia, and medical review triggered

NEJM2018

13. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia

Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia Last reviewed: August 2018 Last updated: January 2018 Summary An inflammatory disorder involving both the peripheral bronchioles and alveoli simultaneously. It has distinctive radiographic findings, histological features, and response (...) to corticosteroids (unlike usual interstitial pneumonia). Most common type is idiopathic BOOP; other types include focal nodular, post-infection, drug-related, rheumatological, immunological, organ transplantation, radiotherapy, environmental, and miscellaneous BOOP. Accounts for 20% to 30% of all cases of chronic infiltrative lung diseases. It occurs equally among men and women, and is not related to smoking. High-resolution chest CT scan shows bilateral patchy triangular ground glass opacities with air

BMJ Best Practice2018

14. Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis Bronchiolitis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Bronchiolitis Last reviewed: August 2018 Last updated: February 2018 Summary Leading cause of hospital admission in infants under 1 year of age. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause. Most cases are mild and self-limiting, and supportive care is the only indicated therapy. Cough may persist for weeks, after 10 to 14 days (...) of acute illness. Some patients may go on to develop recurrent wheeze. Definition Viral bronchiolitis is an acute viral infection of the lower respiratory tract. Although it can affect individuals of any age, the term is most often used to refer to infection in infancy. It is characterised by epithelial cell destruction, cellular oedema, and airway obstruction by inflammatory debris and mucus. The clinical manifestations include cough, wheeze, and laboured breathing. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV

BMJ Best Practice2018

15. International Variation in Asthma and Bronchiolitis Guidelines

International Variation in Asthma and Bronchiolitis Guidelines 29070533 2017 11 13 2017 11 13 1098-4275 140 5 2017 Nov Pediatrics Pediatrics International Variation in Asthma and Bronchiolitis Guidelines. e20170092 10.1542/peds.2017-0092 Guideline recommendations for the same clinical condition may vary. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of agreement among comparable asthma and bronchiolitis treatment recommendations from guidelines. National and international guidelines (...) 7 guidelines for asthma and 4 guidelines for bronchiolitis. For asthma, there were 166 recommendation topics, with 69 recommendation topics given in ≥2 guidelines. For bronchiolitis, there were 46 recommendation topics, with 21 recommendation topics provided in ≥2 guidelines. The overall κ for asthma was 0.03, both unweighted (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.01 to 0.07) and weighted (95% CI: -0.01 to 0.10); for bronchiolitis, it was 0.32 unweighted (95% CI: 0.16 to 0.52) and 0.15 weighted (95

EvidenceUpdates2017

16. High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) for the initial respiratory management of acute viral bronchiolitis in young infants: a multicenter randomized controlled trial (TRAMONTANE study)

High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) for the initial respiratory management of acute viral bronchiolitis in young infants: a multicenter randomized controlled trial (TRAMONTANE study) PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club2017

17. High-flow warm humidified oxygen versus standard low-flow nasal cannula oxygen for moderate bronchiolitis (HFWHO RCT): an open, phase 4, randomised controlled trial

High-flow warm humidified oxygen versus standard low-flow nasal cannula oxygen for moderate bronchiolitis (HFWHO RCT): an open, phase 4, randomised controlled trial PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club2017

18. IV Magnesium Sulfate for Bronchiolitis: A Randomized Trial

IV Magnesium Sulfate for Bronchiolitis: A Randomized Trial 28286262 2017 03 13 2017 07 11 1931-3543 152 1 2017 Jul Chest Chest IV Magnesium Sulfate for Bronchiolitis: A Randomized Trial. 113-119 S0012-3692(17)30361-6 10.1016/j.chest.2017.03.002 The goal of this study was to determine if IV magnesium, useful for severe pediatric asthma, reduces time to medical readiness for discharge in patients with bronchiolitis when added to supportive care. We compared a single dose of 100 mg/kg of IV (...) magnesium sulfate vs placebo for acute bronchiolitis. Patients received bronchodilator therapy, nebulized hypertonic saline, and 5 days of dexamethasone if there was eczema and/or a family history of asthma. Time to medical readiness for discharge was the primary efficacy outcome. Bronchiolitis severity scores and need for infirmary or hospital admission and for clinic revisits within 2 weeks were secondary outcomes. Cardiorespiratory instability onset was the safety outcome. A total of 162 previously

EvidenceUpdates2017

19. Effect of Nebulized Hypertonic Saline Treatment in Emergency Departments on the Hospitalization Rate for Acute Bronchiolitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Effect of Nebulized Hypertonic Saline Treatment in Emergency Departments on the Hospitalization Rate for Acute Bronchiolitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial 28586918 2017 06 06 2017 06 06 2168-6211 2017 Jun 05 JAMA pediatrics JAMA Pediatr Effect of Nebulized Hypertonic Saline Treatment in Emergency Departments on the Hospitalization Rate for Acute Bronchiolitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial. e171333 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.1333 Acute bronchiolitis is the leading cause of hospitalization among (...) infants. Previous studies, underpowered to examine hospital admission, have found a limited benefit of nebulized hypertonic saline (HS) treatment in the pediatric emergency department (ED). To examine whether HS nebulization treatment would decrease the hospital admission rate among infants with a first episode of acute bronchiolitis. The Efficacy of 3% Hypertonic Saline in Acute Viral Bronchiolitis (GUERANDE) study was a multicenter, double-blind randomized clinical trial on 2 parallel groups

EvidenceUpdates2017

20. Is Nebulized Hypertonic Saline Solution Effective for Acute Bronchiolitis?

Is Nebulized Hypertonic Saline Solution Effective for Acute Bronchiolitis? DEFINE_ME_WA This site requires Cookies to be enabled to function. Please ensure Cookies are turned on and then re-visit the desired page.

Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots2017